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Thread: What are you listening to? Classical tips & reviews

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    What are you listening to? Classical tips & reviews

    Tell us what classical music you are currently enjoying, or regularly listen to, give us tips and short reviews.

    I'm currently going through a period of listening to modern classical organ music. The more gothic and scary the better.

    Louis Vierne (1870-1917) - Trois Pieces de Fantasie.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fsa6TXBiIn4

    Leon Boellmann (1862-1897) - 1. Suite Gothique 2. Elevation

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-8QmtOLqhoo (if you recognise a bit of Barry Manilow in there around the 1.30 - 2.15 mark you won't be alone)

    Both of these are on the one LP, being played by Piere Cochereau aux Grand Orgues de Notre Dame de Paris.

    Very gothic, very modern, very scary in parts.

    And extra points if you're listening on old vinyl.
    Last edited by PeterG; 12-02-2012 at 12:04 PM.

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    Also listening a lot to the modern Americans. I've got one old LP recorded in 1976 that I really like, from the M.I.T. Symphony Orchestra, David Epstein, conductor.
    1. Aaron Copland - Dance Symphony
    2. Walter Piston - Suite from the Ballet "The Incredible Flutist"

    Q: Does the M.I.T. SO still exist?

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    Wow! No classical fans here?

  4. #4
    Paul Hindemith Violin Concerto - BBC Philarmonic under Yan Pascal Tortelier, Leonidas Kavakos violin
    Joseph Haydn Piano Trios nos 25-27 Patrick Cohen, Erich Hobarth, Christophe Coin
    --my today's (or yesterday's) classical menu. Hindemith is one of my very favorite composers, I love most of his works. Violin Concero I have in several interpretations, this one I've mentioned isn't the best I have( the orchestra is thin), but also deserves attention.

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    Boo! walt's Avatar
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    I'm immersing myself in Glenn Gould- A State Of Wonder-The Complete Goldberg Variations 1955 &1981.Exquisite.
    "please do not understand me too quickly"-andre gide

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    Member Zeuhlmate's Avatar
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    The last days:
    John Dowland (Julian Bream)
    Fauré: Requiem
    Ravel: Daphne & Chloé.
    Dvorak: American Quartet

  7. #7
    Lots of piano music.
    Ravel by Louis Lortie on Chandos
    Debussy by Paul Crossley on Sony
    Prokofiev by Matti Raekallio on Ondine
    Scriabin by Ruth Laredo, Glenn Gould
    Beethoven Eroica Variations/Bagatelles by Glenn Gould

    Bach Organ works by E. Power Biggs, and Marie Claire Alain

    Also getting into some 20th century opera.

    Alban Berg-Lulu Tate on EMI
    Debussy-Pelleas et Melisande Claudio Abaddo on DG
    Schoenberg-Moses und Aaron Pierre Boulez on Sony

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Reid View Post
    Schoenberg-Moses und Aaron Pierre Boulez on Sony
    How'd you like it? IMO it was a torture. Boulez is different - could be perfect, and next time he's awful - even in lighter Shoenberg's stuff, like Chamber Symphony No.2.

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    That Walter Piston piece is a fine one!

    Last thing I listened to was Fredrick Converse "The Mystic Trumpeter".

    Yes, on vinyl...and maybe even MONO!

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by gregory View Post
    How'd you like it? IMO it was a torture. Boulez is different - could be perfect, and next time he's awful - even in lighter Shoenberg's stuff, like Chamber Symphony No.2.
    It's kind of an eerie piece. Especially the singing. And it conjures up creepy imagery of lewd bible stories about debauchery and idol worship. I have this on the Pierre Boulez Edition 6 CD set. It's a lot of Schoenberg vocal music. I wish it included Book Of Hanging Gardens.

    As far as the chamber symphonies, I prefer no. 1. For some reason Sony included no. 2 on the all vocal Boulez set.

    Whatever you do, don't buy Von Karajan's orchestral CD of Verklart Nacht. It's the biggest pile of mush I've ever heard.

    I like this 2 CD set on EMI.
    Last edited by Reid; 12-05-2012 at 12:13 AM.

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    I've been digging into the turn of the (previous) century British scene. I usually listen to a lot of Americans (yeah, Piston is fine) such as David Diamond, Howard Hanson, Samuel Barber and Aaron Copland. But lately I've been enjoying the likes of Parry, Stanford, Howells, Vaughan-Williams, Bliss, Bax, Alwyn, Rubbra, Ireland, Bridge, Holst, etc...Especially their tone poems and symphonies. There is such a rich, distintive heritage in the British scene. I love that drive toward cosmopolitan modernism tempered by the pastoral and timeless.

    I've also been digging into the work conductor Charles Munch did with the Boston Symphony in the late '50's/early '60's--classic Romantic works. He tends to take it very crisp and brisk-- very engaging. And mostly very good sound on the remastered RCA CD series.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Reid View Post
    Whatever you do, don't buy Von Karajan's orchestral CD of Verklart Nacht. It's the biggest pile of mush I've ever heard.
    Well, that disc will always have a special place as it was my introduction into Schoenberg. Yep, it is quite a Romantic interpretation but you could argue that Verklarte Nacht is a hyperromantic piece just as his Pelleas And Mellisande. I also have a new (live) recording made by Janine Jansen and friends of the original chamber version which I still have to listen to but what I have heard about it it seems to be a very strong performance.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Reach View Post
    I've been digging into the turn of the (previous) century British scene. I usually listen to a lot of Americans (yeah, Piston is fine) such as David Diamond, Howard Hanson, Samuel Barber and Aaron Copland. But lately I've been enjoying the likes of Parry, Stanford, Howells, Vaughan-Williams, Bliss, Bax, Alwyn, Rubbra, Ireland, Bridge, Holst, etc...Especially their tone poems and symphonies. There is such a rich, distintive heritage in the British scene. I love that drive toward cosmopolitan modernism tempered by the pastoral and timeless.
    Make sure you don't miss out on Malcolm Arnold's symphonies and concertos (all them are availabe in stellar performances helmed by Vernon Handley, in the case of the symphonies). That particular drive you mention is very much apparent in Arnold's music but with one great addition: the man knew how to write stellar tunes as well.

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    Boo! walt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Reach View Post
    I've been digging into the turn of the (previous) century British scene. I usually listen to a lot of Americans (yeah, Piston is fine) such as David Diamond, Howard Hanson, Samuel Barber and Aaron Copland. But lately I've been enjoying the likes of Parry, Stanford, Howells, Vaughan-Williams, Bliss, Bax, Alwyn, Rubbra, Ireland, Bridge, Holst, etc...Especially their tone poems and symphonies. .
    You might like the String Quartets of E.J.Moeran(1894-1950)British composer who lived in Ireland most of his life.I have a Naxos cd of his String Quartets and they're fine stuff.
    "please do not understand me too quickly"-andre gide

  15. #15
    I always liked the music of the "old" masters and yes, it includes operas. However I have re-discovered recently modern composers like Arto Part, Philip Glass, Henryk Gorecki, Steve Roach, György Ligeti and I like it a lot...

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    Member Emeritus (A.M.P.) rcarlberg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeterG View Post
    And extra points if you're listening on old vinyl.
    Why? Where is the fairy dust in surface noise, rumble, clicks and pops?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Reach View Post
    I've been digging into the turn of the (previous) century British scene. I usually listen to a lot of Americans (yeah, Piston is fine) such as David Diamond, Howard Hanson, Samuel Barber and Aaron Copland. But lately I've been enjoying the likes of Parry, Stanford, Howells, Vaughan-Williams, Bliss, Bax, Alwyn, Rubbra, Ireland, Bridge, Holst, etc...Especially their tone poems and symphonies. There is such a rich, distintive heritage in the British scene. I love that drive toward cosmopolitan modernism tempered by the pastoral and timeless.

    .
    So very, very true.
    You have garnered a Prog Masterman's respect, sir.

  18. #18
    Boo! walt's Avatar
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    Here's a YT clip of one of E.J.Moeran's String Quartets.Enjoy.

    "please do not understand me too quickly"-andre gide

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    Thanks guys. Yeah, I am familiar with Arnold and Moeran. I like them too. My tastes have usually run toward that kind of modernism; but what surprises me is how I've lately been enjoying the more 'stuffy' music of Stanford and Parry-- practical Brahmsian icons of the establishment. I'd like to think my tastes are just expanding :-)

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    I've been enjoying a Naxos cd of Trio Sonatas by Dietrich Buxtehude (1637-1707),who is best known for his organ compositions.These pieces are scored for violin, viola da gamba and keyboard(harpsichord/organ)

    "please do not understand me too quickly"-andre gide

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    Sorry, can't help myself.Here's another Trio Sonata-Violin Sonata No. 2 by Heinrich Ignaz Franz von Biber(1644-1704),scored for baroque violin,theorbo(a type of lute),and organ/harpsichord.What can i say, i like this stuff.Performed by Trio Romanesca from a great 2cd set.

    "please do not understand me too quickly"-andre gide

  22. #22
    I just received this diverse collection (4-CD) featuring some obscure piano music in addition to music by Scriabin, Prokofiev, Berg, and Schumann. These 2012 re-issues are more affordable than the earlier Glenn Gould Editions, and feature extensive liner notes. Recommended over those cheap Sony cardboard box sets with no info.


  23. #23
    I tend to only enjoy 20th Century and beyond stuff lately.

    Elliot Carter
    Joseph Schwantner
    Ersnt Krenek
    Joan Tower
    Olivier Messiaen
    Xenakis
    Wourinen
    Webern
    Schnitke
    Ligeti
    Penderecki

    To name a few off the top of my head.

    Love chamber works as well as symphonic works. 12tone, atonal, tonal...

    I haven't been able to listen to anything written before about 1910 for a long time.

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    Alan Hovanness
    Ralph Vaughan Williams

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    Quote Originally Posted by Reach View Post
    I've been digging into the turn of the (previous) century British scene........... Vaughan-Williams, Bliss, Bax, Alwyn, Rubbra, Ireland, Bridge, Holst, etc...Especially their tone poems and symphonies. There is such a rich, distintive heritage in the British scene. I love that drive toward cosmopolitan modernism tempered by the pastoral and timeless.
    That is also my favourite period , especially the pieces that use old folk music and my favourite composer is Vaughan-Williams. If you haven't done so yet have a listen to Percy Grainger, Hamilton Harty, Gerald Finzi , Thomas Pitfield, Rebecca Clarke, George Butterworth.

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