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Thread: Still Got The Blues…anyone?

  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by klothos View Post

    ...and they played what they felt. They often never played the same song the same way twice ( I remember a blues jam I was hosting about ten years ago and a person I was talking to - a Blues Nazi - had said that he was watching an SRV video and that Stevie played his solo wrong...I just blinked at the guy in disbelief). They locked into what they played as to how they felt it for that moment - an audio representation of their soul at that moment in time. It wasn't about playing songs note-for-note and making sure every "i" was dotted and "t" crossed in the performance of the song.

    Its hard for me to find new releases by new artists that "get it"
    I think your point is interesting as we have a “blues association” here in Kalamazoo that I have heard accused of the exact thing you mention. I don’t know any current member personally, so can’t really comment, but I do know some former members who reflect a similar point of view to yours. On the other hand, I have to give the KBA some props as they have created a very strong blues scene here (especially for the size town this is) and have brought a lot of live blues to the area, so I guess it is a double edged sword.

    Steve Sly

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    Check him out at 2:15...


  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveSly View Post
    Isn't everyone an imitator at this point? I mean, what is there in blues that has not already been done 50 years ago. To me blues is more about legacy than originality at this point. There are a ton of great blues players out there today, but I would not say that any of them are really breaking new ground.
    Precisely why I don't listen to blues much anymore, although there was a time when I did. I like players who pay homage to the blues on occasion, but have other things going on in their arsenal. Robben Ford is a good example, as is Scott Henderson and Oz Noy; these guys are basically jazz players who can play the shit out of the blues when they feel like it. The blues vocabulary is too limited for me, much as I can appreciate the emotion that goes into it. In fact I'd encourage players who are starting out to learn to play blues first; it's not extremely difficult to figure out and most importantly, you're learning to play from the heart. But then move on to other musical ground.

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    Quote Originally Posted by No Pride View Post
    Precisely why I don't listen to blues much anymore, although there was a time when I did.
    For me, I really just discovered blues in the past 15 years or so, so I never got burned out on it. I went to the occasional blues show when I was young (BB King, Mighty Joe Young), but really not get into it until I kind of accidentally saw Luther Allison in a club in Chicago back in the 90’s. I was so blown away that I started exploring blues at that point and have grown to love it, although I lean more towards the rock end of the blues spectrum. Having a fairly strong blues scene here in my home town has also helped as I have had the chance to see a lot of great blues artists that have come through town in the last decade or so.

    Steve Sly

  5. #55
    Oh No! Bass Solo! klothos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by No Pride View Post
    In fact I'd encourage players who are starting out to learn to play blues first; it's not extremely difficult to figure out and most importantly, you're learning to play from the heart. But then move on to other musical ground.
    That was the magic of some of the popular punk-styles and 80s Metal back in the day: it really didnt take much to be a novice and be in the ballpark of what was needed. A 3 -piece gtr/bs/drms band of novices can actually cover a lot of sonic territory, even if they needed years of practice/refinement to make it sound good....by its nature, Blues is arguably more forgiving in that sense.

  6. #56
    Unless I missed him being mentioned earlier in the thread...Roy Buchannan.

  7. #57
    Member hippypants's Avatar
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    Yeah, I tend to listen more of blues rock, I guess.

    I'd second the votes for at least Johnny Winter's first two albums.
    I like a lot of SRV too.
    I like a lot of the early Fleetwood Mac stuff--Blues in Chicago, etc.
    T-Bone Walker
    Charlie Christian
    Canned Heat's first two albums are pretty good.
    Groundhog's Split album.
    Etc.

  8. #58
    Quote Originally Posted by Banquo View Post
    Excellent point. I suppose that makes SRV just as much an innovator as Johnny Winter.
    Now THAT is funny!

    Quote Originally Posted by No Pride View Post
    In fact I'd encourage players who are starting out to learn to play blues first; it's not extremely difficult to figure out and most importantly, you're learning to play from the heart.
    I had a co-worker years ago who's kid insisted on learning how to play on an electric. I suggested an acoustic would be a better way to begin for obvious reasons. Anyhoo, this kid, apparently, liked Eric Clapton, which is fine with me. I further suggested that, if he really wanted to play like Eric, he shouldn't watch his hands, he watch his face and see where it all comes from.
    "A conspiracy of silence speaks louder than words."

    - Dr. Winston O'Boogie

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    Quote Originally Posted by ronmac View Post
    Now THAT is funny!
    Glad you got a kick out of it.

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    Member Vic2012's Avatar
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    ZZ Top

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    Highly Evolved Orangutan JKL2000's Avatar
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    Although this is a blues, I don't know if it counts as a "blues" arrangement or whatever - more New Orleans Jazz I guess? Still, it's great - I know a lot of people know it already.


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    Quote Originally Posted by JKL2000 View Post
    Although this is a blues, I don't know if it counts as a "blues" arrangement or whatever - more New Orleans Jazz I guess?
    A rose by any other name... But among other things, it shows you how different blues sounded before there were any electric guitars.

  13. #63
    Quote Originally Posted by JKL2000 View Post
    Although this is a blues, I don't know if it counts as a "blues" arrangement or whatever - more New Orleans Jazz I guess? Still, it's great - I know a lot of people know it already.
    Really great.
    "A conspiracy of silence speaks louder than words."

    - Dr. Winston O'Boogie

  14. #64
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    No matter how corrupt, greedy, and heartless our government, our corporations, our media, and our religious and charitable institutions may become, the music will still be wonderful. - Kurt Vonnegut

  15. #65
    Maybe not blues, but a great song

    NEVER UNDERESTIMATE THE POWER OF STUPID PEOPLE IN LARGE GROUPS!

  16. #66
    This sounded much better seeing it live.

    NEVER UNDERESTIMATE THE POWER OF STUPID PEOPLE IN LARGE GROUPS!

  17. #67
    Quote Originally Posted by klothos View Post


    What the Blues Nazis do not get is the music itself. A lot of these societies are trying to "Preserve the Blues" and will often support bands and artists that are trying to mimic the electric blues greats of the 50s+ or SRV (as overplayed as SRV is, Stevie did indeed get it ). Even being admant about the gear (point to point wired tube heads, vintage gear, or guitars without pointy headstocks, or no amp simulators). The point that they miss is that BB King, Albert King, John Lee Hooker, etc werent interested in sounding like anything but themselves. They chose what they played and how they played because they liked it and for no other reason. They weren't trying to sound "vintage" (as a matter of fact, a '56 Deluxe in 1956 was NEW technology). Albert played a Flying V ( a guitar doesnt get any more pointier than that) and, in the late 60s/early 70s, played through solid-state Ampeg amps.
    I think it was an Acoustic amp that Albert King used, but the point remains the same. It still wasn't what the "purists" say is an "approved" form of amplification.

    You know who owns all three of Albert's Flying V guitars? Steven Segal! Yeah, the Chuck Norris wannabe fancies himself a "blues man" now, and he apparently has the money to buy not just vintage gear, but celebrity vintage gear! Oy!

    Oh, and there are "pointier" guitars out there than the Flying V. Maybe not back in 1967, but Ibanez, BC Rich, Jackson, Dean, Westone, Hondo, Carvin and even Guild made guitars that seemed to be trying to out do the Flying V and Explorer in the "pointy" department.

    I always thought it'd be cool to play in a country band or something like that, and show up with a BC Rich Bich or Mockingbird or a Flying V, just to see what kind of reaction you get from people.

    I remember when Gary Moore started playing blues in the early 90's, he stopped playing his Fender style guitars and pulled out his old Les Paul (yes, the Peter Green one), because he felt there were "too many guys already playing blues on Strats" and he felt the Les Paul tied him to the British blues heritage of Greeny, Clapton, etc.

  18. #68
    Oh No! Bass Solo! klothos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    I think it was an Acoustic amp that Albert King used, but the point remains the same. It still wasn't what the "purists" say is an "approved" form of amplification.
    Acoustic.....thank you

    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    You know who owns all three of Albert's Flying V guitars? Steven Segal! Yeah, the Chuck Norris wannabe fancies himself a "blues man" now, and he apparently has the money to buy not just vintage gear, but celebrity vintage gear! Oy!
    ...apparently, it can get worse

    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    Oh, and there are "pointier" guitars out there than the Flying V. Maybe not back in 1967, but Ibanez, BC Rich, Jackson, Dean, Westone, Hondo, Carvin and even Guild made guitars that seemed to be trying to out do the Flying V and Explorer in the "pointy" department.
    In the 80s, I bought Mike Turpin's BC Rich Mockingbird Bass from Axe ( I mentioned Axe in the Unsung Rock Bands thread). This bass was pointy but gorgeous. It had a Roto-switch. All kinds of series/parallel taps. Two sets of DiMarzio P-Style Split PUs. Handmade...with Flite Case with Axe stenciled on it. It would probably fetch about 4K or more on eBay nowadays...It was the biggest piece of shit I ever owned: even with fresh strings (which I am to this day adamant about using), it got one million different combinations of a well-executed fart.

    ...but my point was you should see the way some of the n00b jammers that show up with their pointy RG-Series Ibanezes get treated at some of these gigs. If I didnt need the money as part of my income, I would probably stop co-hosting a lot of these. As it stands, I keep my mouth shut, play when I have to play, help other bass players and vocalists sit in, and make my ca$h.

    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    I always thought it'd be cool to play in a country band or something like that, and show up with a BC Rich Bich or Mockingbird or a Flying V, just to see what kind of reaction you get from people.
    I briefly owned an early 80s hunk-of-crap Ibanez EX series Destroyer about 20 years ago. I DID use it for a hired-gun country gig and I also used it for a hired-gun 50s/ Elvis/ Doo Wop show......needless to say, I never worked with either act since

    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    I remember when Gary Moore started playing blues in the early 90's, he stopped playing his Fender style guitars and pulled out his old Les Paul (yes, the Peter Green one), because he felt there were "too many guys already playing blues on Strats" and he felt the Les Paul tied him to the British blues heritage of Greeny, Clapton, etc.
    Im out to lunch with Gary Moore: sometimes I hear something by him and think "Yeah, he gets it", but every version of "Still Got The Blues" I have heard all sound exactly the same

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    Quote Originally Posted by klothos View Post
    Im out to lunch with Gary Moore: sometimes I hear something by him and think "Yeah, he gets it", but every version of "Still Got The Blues" I have heard all sound exactly the same
    I hate to say anything bad about Gary Moore. God rest his soul, he was a fucking guitar master, but he did do that blues thing into submission.

  20. #70
    Can't get no sleeves for my records.......
    Can't get no laces for my shoes........
    Can't get no fancy notes on my blue guitar...
    Can't get no one to go for.....................

    90% of the material covered by the bands in my area is Blues based. Its cool as shit when guy's like Steve Ray come along but as good as Bonnamassa and others are... its all the same shit to me anymore. I would give anything for the complex beauty of prog to come back to life. I suppose I will wish for this until the day I die.

    No one needs to preserve the blues... Its not running much risk of extinction... plenty of patrons dancing and singing along to the blues in any gin joint, in any town, anywhere, every night.... On the other hand....Progressive rock.... HUmmmmmmm now there's something that should be preserved.... live bands covering this material are Rare... ! I know.... ! I've seen me try and do it. I am trying to do it again...... Please wish me luck ... The odd's are I'll be singing the blues again soon.........
    Of course, not being of the daily persuasion in this opinion laden public prog bathhouse, my diatribe of recent lucubration is perhaps as welcome as a rats teat. One often is forced to weigh the desire to flash judgment within against the effort required as well as the value this knowledge will be to the greater good of all mankind or whatever inhabits the current spa. At best, its a slippery slope.

  21. #71
    Hendrix was known to play a Les Paul, as well. I have a Fillmore East recording from May of 68 where he plays one. Here's a shot from the same show:

    "A conspiracy of silence speaks louder than words."

    - Dr. Winston O'Boogie

  22. #72
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  23. #73
    This thread seems to be addressing a one dimensional aspect of blues music. Guitar licks. I don't care about the next 14 year old blues guitar prodigy. I want to listen to somebody with some life experience. Someone who can write a song, and sing too. I don't listen to much straight ahead blues anymore, but I like Mem Shannon from New Orleans. His music is about life, not guitar licks. And the guy has a world view. His lyrics aren't all filled with tired cliches. He also plays with a clean, glassy tone, and he's even done some nylon string solos.

  24. #74
    Oh No! Bass Solo! klothos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Reid View Post
    This thread seems to be addressing a one dimensional aspect of blues music. Guitar licks. I don't care about the next 14 year old blues guitar prodigy. I want to listen to somebody with some life experience. Someone who can write a song, and sing too. I don't listen to much straight ahead blues anymore, but I like Mem Shannon from New Orleans. His music is about life, not guitar licks. And the guy has a world view. His lyrics aren't all filled with tired cliches. He also plays with a clean, glassy tone, and he's even done some nylon string solos.

    I totally 100% agree with you but, unfortunately, for a good percentage of blues aficionados, it is all about guitar licks and gear: that is a big part of what it has become -- sad, really

  25. #75
    Member davis's Avatar
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    so why don't you guys post something bluesy that you're more interested in? I'm open to it



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