Page 16 of 16 FirstFirst 12345678910111213141516
Results 376 to 386 of 386

Thread: Music From Norway: Just how important is it, really?

  1. #376
    Member Marco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Brazil
    Posts
    188
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    I took a walk down to the Big Dipper store and got the new Needlepoint, and then walked back home again for some Scotch and listening.

    It's -very- good and, like Jacob says, notching up the references a bit. More epic and meandering structure as well. I'd say the most intriguing aspect of Klakegg's instrumental formula is that of a peculiar harmonic sensibility, circling around the same bars of pittoresque chord progressions and that inimitably lightweight voice of his - whereas dynamics are much more consistent and almost smooth, rarely gripping any rough edges.

    I enjoy it far more than their previous release, which was fine but somewhat of an anticlimax after Aimless Mary. This one is simply more, er, "prog" as hoped for. Although it's campy to state that, I know.
    Agreed. It's far more memorable as well; the only track I can actively recall from Robert Reverie is the opener.
    bass player and singer in an occult heavy prog band called Papangu. debut album in spring 2021

  2. #377
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    I took a walk
    What? Is this allowed? A non essential movement that could put to danger so many people? You should be moving only for work and food if you were truly responsible. Work and eat.

    The album is so sweet and good.

  3. #378
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    I took a walk down to the Big Dipper store and got the new Needlepoint, and then walked back home again for some Scotch and listening.

    It's -very- good and, like Jacob says, notching up the references a bit. More epic and meandering structure as well. I'd say the most intriguing aspect of Klakegg's instrumental formula is that of a peculiar harmonic sensibility, circling around the same bars of pittoresque chord progressions and that inimitably lightweight voice of his - whereas dynamics are much more consistent and almost smooth, rarely gripping any rough edges.

    In a way it's strange, because I've become accustomed to listening to new Needlepoint during heat in late spring and throughout the summer. These days are dark and immensely chilly - in so many regards. I only know I'll be listening to this thing for months to come. I enjoy it far more than their previous release, which was fine but somewhat of an anticlimax after Aimless Mary. This one is simply more, er, "prog" as hoped for. Although it's campy to state that, I know.

    Awaiting the upcoming Suburban Savages now.
    Rich, your anecdotes really make me want to visit Oslo even more than I already wanted to. It sounds so nice there.

    Thanks for sharing your opinion on the new Needlepoint too. I forgot this had come out, and I've got it pulled up on Apple Music to listen this evening. I liked their last one, but your enthusiasm here makes me excited to hear this new disc.

  4. #379
    Quote Originally Posted by Zappathustra View Post
    The album is so sweet and good.
    Awesome! I'm looking forward to hearing it.

  5. #380
    Quote Originally Posted by Zappathustra View Post
    What? Is this allowed? A non essential movement that could put to danger so many people?
    We vikings make our own rules with tools of our own drinks, buddy. Interestingly, the dude at the store proclaimed how this was "The album of the year!", and while I promptly and rudely proceeded to ask him how old he was, he stepped a bit away to act out "potentially offended" and then harshly admitted "[...] I'm 20".

    So, you've come to the conclusion that this exact release is somehow "the best of the year"? I mean, good for you - but as opposed to which other releases?

    They need to get a bit of credit for that, though - in fact the whole physical music market in Oslo does; they practically revel in the greatness of renewed interest in "progressive rock" as phenomenon, with all of its attachments. And as a point of fascination, younger vinyl freaks for instance seem to consistently turn to psychedelic 60s or progressive 70s rock. Some folk and fusion added, I expect.

    Ah, I surely hope for things to open up a bit before summer, so that we can have a concert or two. Maybe Wobbler or Tusmørke or Jordsjø or something. But somehow I suspect and fear not.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  6. #381
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    The Planet Lovetron
    Posts
    8,337
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    they practically revel in the greatness of renewed interest in "progressive rock" as phenomenon, with all of its attachments.
    Have they declared Jon Anderson to be the greatest musical entity of the last 500 years? I think not. Therefore, they lie in darkness.

    I would expect more from the Belgians, even.
    He did not know that the sword he'd hold, would turn his priceless empire into fool's gold...

    http://www.discogs.com/user/moecurlythanu/collection

  7. #382
    Member Marco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Brazil
    Posts
    188
    Big Dipper really surprised this Third World native when I walked in and promptly saw motW's Part the Second and a few Cheer-Accident records on display.
    bass player and singer in an occult heavy prog band called Papangu. debut album in spring 2021

  8. #383
    Member Marco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Brazil
    Posts
    188
    Ok, the new e9 is awesome. Compositions are tightly knit around the Rhodes, and the sonic palette is much more eclectic than the fierce psychedelia jams we're used to. There's some dubby bass here and there, ondes Martenot-ish synths, funky drumming straight outta Mike Clark's legacy with Herbie's Headhunters, and this anxious cloud hanging over your head like the sword of Damocles that gives this album a cool horror/sci-fi vibe, or a thematic compatibility with the Mementos dungeon in Persona 5.
    bass player and singer in an occult heavy prog band called Papangu. debut album in spring 2021

  9. #384
    ^ I went home from work early today to have some drinks and scroll arbitrarily through allthings vaguely defined as "progressive" from the past 20 years or-so in Norwegian rock/contemporary. Grey afternoon and sleety end of winter outside - extreme cold over now. It usually is by late February.

    I believe I mentioned it early on in this very thread, but the antecedent origins of alterations-in-motion as to paradigmatic things in modern Norwegian rock/contemporary was the emergence of label Rune Grammofon, the concert venue Blå, Cloroform's second album All-Scars, Supersilent's debut, Motorpsycho's Trust Us and the release of Helge Sten's (Deathprod) reprocessing of selected works by Arne Nordheim on Rune Grammofon's compilation Electric. This basically -all- happened in 1998 - for undetermined reasons yet to be explored and explained.

    Anyway, this is my starting point for the night. 1998. It'll be loud and painful for the neighbours.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  10. #385
    Maybe they got inspired by the emergence and success of the 'nu-jazz' (I know it's a later term and also used for the watered down lounge variants, so just for brevity's sake) scene around Molvær, Wesseltoft and Jazzland Recordings?
    τί ἐστιν ὃ μίαν ἔχον φωνὴν τετράπουν καὶ δίπουν καὶ τρίπουν γίνεται;

  11. #386
    ^ Molvær's Khmer was definitely an embryo.

    Molvær also contributed to the Elephant Song project by Rune Kristoffersen himself (the man behind Rune Grammofon) in 1993, which was a peculiar blend of instrumental pop, soft jazz, electronica and (deliberately) easy-listening scapes. Kristoffersen had initially established as one half of the sophisti-pop duo Fra Lippo Lippi, who enjoyed a couple of hit singles but were pretty much written off by the music industry here in Norway by the early 90s. His main interests were obviously very eclectic, though - to our and everybody's gain eventually. Rune Grammofon remains a seminal institution in the vitalization of contemporary Norwegian music, and I find it particularly rewarding how they've embraced "progressive" formulas these past 10-15 years.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •