Page 8 of 8 FirstFirst ... 45678
Results 176 to 195 of 195

Thread: Looking for some new horror movies

  1. #176
    Quote Originally Posted by Klonk View Post
    Cabinet of Curiosities

    Guillermo del Toro horror anthology over on netflix. So much fun! I'm a huge Creepshow, Tales from the Crypt etc fan so this is right up my alley. If you like that sort of thing I highly recommend checking this out. I'm halfway through and can't wait to jump back in...
    there's another anthology series on Tubi called Masters of Horror. some eps are better than others but there's enough nudity to keep one interested.
    "She said you are the air I breathe
    The life I love, the dream I weave."


    Unevensong - Camel

  2. #177
    Irritated Lawn Guy Klonk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Rockland, NY
    Posts
    2,303
    Quote Originally Posted by UnephenStephen View Post
    there's another anthology series on Tubi called Masters of Horror. some eps are better than others but there's enough nudity to keep one interested.
    Yes! I remember when this came out years back. I loved John Carpenter's episode called Cigarette Burns.
    "Who would have thought a whale would be so heavy?" - Moe Sizlak

  3. #178
    Member dropforge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    3,375
    Quote Originally Posted by Klonk View Post
    Yes! I remember when this came out years back. I loved John Carpenter's episode called Cigarette Burns.
    With Norman Reedus! Yeah, I actually bought that DVD. Don Coscarelli's "Incident on and Off a Mountain Road" is very good, too.

  4. #179
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    The Planet Lovetron
    Posts
    11,495
    ^

  5. #180
    Irritated Lawn Guy Klonk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Rockland, NY
    Posts
    2,303
    Quote Originally Posted by dropforge View Post
    With Norman Reedus! Yeah, I actually bought that DVD. Don Coscarelli's "Incident on and Off a Mountain Road" is very good, too.
    Yes! I actually own that 1st season box set that came in a mausoleum Dario Argento had a great one called Jennifer and Takashi Miike's Imprint was twisted. I think Clive Barker had a good one in there too...gotta check this out again
    "Who would have thought a whale would be so heavy?" - Moe Sizlak

  6. #181
    Member dropforge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    3,375
    Quote Originally Posted by Klonk View Post
    Yes! I actually own that 1st season box set that came in a mausoleum Dario Argento had a great one called Jennifer and Takashi Miike's Imprint was twisted. I think Clive Barker had a good one in there too...gotta check this out again
    "Jenifer" was an adaption of the classic Bronze Age horror story by writer Bruce Jones and the legendary artist Bernie Wrightson. Horror comix don't get better than this.

    http://sweasel.com/wp-content/themes...s/jenifer.html

  7. #182
    Quote Originally Posted by Rick L. View Post
    Hagazussa it was. Pretty tripped put film. Did the Hammer Horror Mummy flick earlier.
    I didn't exactly love it, but it's a very worthwhile watch for an arthouse symbolic folk-horror flic. Gruesome in part (the rape espec), but visionally stunning and with an atmosphere to sigh for. The scene where she embraces/caresses the goat's teats/udders is arguably the most shockinly erotic feature of any modern picture I saw. For a debut film this is near-sensationally good. Long-winded and possibly not as "scary" as intended, yet wholly convincing as expression of aesthetic.

    I saw 'Smile' the other day, and it's so not good. The kids in my youngest son's class at school (he's 13) keep talking of it, and that essentially frightens me more than the lackluster quality of the film. I mean, they thought 'Prey' to be a reasonably fine pic as well. Jesus.

    'Smile'; Basically a run-of-the-mill going-through-the-motions of cheap thrills psychorror clichés, though somehow worse. Someone at a production company's workshop-house came up with the unifying idea of how people's grins sometimes summon a "bad feeling" inside when you look at them - so let's make a movie about it to make some moneys so as to make more commerce apps in order to make life less likeable than it already is. And let's pretend that we even bothered to embroider a so-called storyline (although essentially this isn't really necessary nowadays) for us to throw atopofit. The most important thing, after all, is that the right credentials are withheld and observed with respect to identities of those included in the production itself.

    The elaborate travesty of the movie isn't its sacked doom of artistic calling, though. Nor its succubus sanctioning of foolish charade. It's its implication of appeal; it says that this is what audience deserve since they're not more deserving to begin with. It's about as disgraceful as a "progressive rock" ambition aspiring to -not- embody creative ideals of virtue but to merely fart out an echo of former rex.

    I mean, one thing is the overt plagiarism and interreferential mode of feature.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  8. #183
    Quote Originally Posted by dropforge View Post
    "Jenifer" was an adaption of the classic Bronze Age horror story by writer Bruce Jones and the legendary artist Bernie Wrightson. Horror comix don't get better than this.

    http://sweasel.com/wp-content/themes...s/jenifer.html
    The most disturbing asset of the 'Jenifer' episode was her act of fellatio on the victim, who's certainly not a protagonist but rather a tragic character of forlorn neglect. As for interpretations of allegorical ligature, it tells of frailness and the weak composite in judgement both in relation to sexual longing and more existential tropes of fallacy. Here in Norway, that short story featured in the comic-book serial 'Iskalde Grøss', based quite obviously on the Masters of Horror-franchise by way of vintage Tales From the Crypt-dialectics. In the original drawings, the Jenifer figure had these severely long fangs sticking out of her mouth and beyond the lower liphold. You won't want a bj then.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  9. #184
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    I didn't exactly love it, but it's a very worthwhile watch for an arthouse symbolic folk-horror flic. Gruesome in part (the rape espec), but visionally stunning and with an atmosphere to sigh for. The scene where she embraces/caresses the goat's teats/udders is arguably the most shockinly erotic feature of any modern picture I saw. For a debut film this is near-sensationally good. Long-winded and possibly not as "scary" as intended, yet wholly convincing as expression of aesthetic.

    I saw 'Smile' the other day, and it's so not good. The kids in my youngest son's class at school (he's 13) keep talking of it, and that essentially frightens me more than the lackluster quality of the film. I mean, they thought 'Prey' to be a reasonably fine pic as well. Jesus.

    'Smile'; Basically a run-of-the-mill going-through-the-motions of cheap thrills psychorror clichés, though somehow worse. Someone at a production company's workshop-house came up with the unifying idea of how people's grins sometimes summon a "bad feeling" inside when you look at them - so let's make a movie about it to make some moneys so as to make more commerce apps in order to make life less likeable than it already is. And let's pretend that we even bothered to embroider a so-called storyline (although essentially this isn't really necessary nowadays) for us to throw atopofit. The most important thing, after all, is that the right credentials are withheld and observed with respect to identities of those included in the production itself.

    The elaborate travesty of the movie isn't its sacked doom of artistic calling, though. Nor its succubus sanctioning of foolish charade. It's its implication of appeal; it says that this is what audience deserve since they're not more deserving to begin with. It's about as disgraceful as a "progressive rock" ambition aspiring to -not- embody creative ideals of virtue but to merely fart out an echo of former rex.

    I mean, one thing is the overt plagiarism and interreferential mode of feature.
    Yeah. Hagazussa was a pretty impressive first film. Pretty good job of sustaining a mood. Definitely some similarities with The Witch. And lots of great isolated scenes. The goat one you mentioned. Also, the hair washing/self-"baptism". I dug it, overall.

  10. #185
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Kalamazoo Michigan
    Posts
    8,087
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post

    I saw 'Smile' the other day, and it's so not good. The kids in my youngest son's class at school (he's 13) keep talking of it, and that essentially frightens me more than the lackluster quality of the film. I mean, they thought 'Prey' to be a reasonably fine pic as well. Jesus.

    'Smile'; Basically a run-of-the-mill going-through-the-motions of cheap thrills psychorror clichés, though somehow worse. Someone at a production company's workshop-house came up with the unifying idea of how people's grins sometimes summon a "bad feeling" inside when you look at them - so let's make a movie about it to make some moneys so as to make more commerce apps in order to make life less likeable than it already is. And let's pretend that we even bothered to embroider a so-called storyline (although essentially this isn't really necessary nowadays) for us to throw atopofit. The most important thing, after all, is that the right credentials are withheld and observed with respect to identities of those included in the production itself.

    The elaborate travesty of the movie isn't its sacked doom of artistic calling, though. Nor its succubus sanctioning of foolish charade. It's its implication of appeal; it says that this is what audience deserve since they're not more deserving to begin with. It's about as disgraceful as a "progressive rock" ambition aspiring to -not- embody creative ideals of virtue but to merely fart out an echo of former rex.

    I mean, one thing is the overt plagiarism and interreferential mode of feature.
    Wow, I walked away with a totally different take on "Smile". As I posted a few days ago, I really enjoyed it and thought it was one of the better horror films I have seen lately. The film had it's flaws and was not nearly as original as it wanted to be taken, but still I thought the acting was good and the storyline was decent. Different strokes I guess..............

  11. #186
    I did not look back to see if anyone listed "Let the Right One In." I am speaking of the original, not the American version. While that film does not have a whole lot of gore, it carries great resonance as the full spectrum of what is happening unfolds. How Eli is choosing her next watcher, what Eli does. It is a great movie.
    I'm not lazy. I just work so fast I'm always done.

  12. #187
    Are you familiar with director Don Coscarelli, the guy who made the classic Phantasm?
    If so and you can dig some surreality and humor along with the horror, l heartily recommend Bubba Ho-Tep (starring Bruce Campbell as Elvis, and the peerless Ossie Davis as JFK), and also the extremely twisted John Dies At The End.
    Once you "get" Coscarelli there is no substitute.

  13. #188
    Member dropforge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    3,375
    Quote Originally Posted by veteranof1000psychicwars View Post
    Are you familiar with director Don Coscarelli, the guy who made the classic Phantasm?
    If so and you can dig some surreality and humor along with the horror, l heartily recommend Bubba Ho-Tep (starring Bruce Campbell as Elvis, and the peerless Ossie Davis as JFK), and also the extremely twisted John Dies At The End.
    Once you "get" Coscarelli there is no substitute.
    Bubba Ho-Tep is groovy. After many years, the sequel is finally going to happen. Its full title was revealed as Bubba Nosferatu: Curse of the She-Vampires.

    I didn't care for John Des at the End, though. Coscarelli ended up producing and directing it after the book popped up as a recommendation from Amazon based on his browsing history. Seriously. He bought it, read it and decided to turn it into a movie.

  14. #189
    Quote Originally Posted by Dana5140 View Post
    I did not look back to see if anyone listed "Let the Right One In." I am speaking of the original, not the American version. While that film does not have a whole lot of gore, it carries great resonance as the full spectrum of what is happening unfolds. [...] It is a great movie.
    It's a fantastic film, I'd say, but in particular for us Scandinavians who actually recall that very era of the early 80s' Sweden. I'd belong to that same generation as the kid protagonist there.

    Tomas Alfredson's (director) next film (Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, on le Carré's spy novel), was stupendous too. I'll never forget the vibe of that cinema theatre in Kristiansand where I saw it, half the audience somewhat obviously bewildered at what the whole thing was all about and the other half fascinated, almost hypnotized. It's got one of the greatest soundtracks I heard these past 20 years.

    But when Alfredson came here to Oslo for The Snowman (based on Jo Nesbø's book), it resulted in absolute failure. I wish he'd find the time and resources to redo it, but there's fat chance of such. Much of the filming took place in very close proximity to where I live, and it doesn't even succeed in capturing auras of the Schrøder restaurant, something you'll practically be able to do by just passing it in a damn bus.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  15. #190
    But when Alfredson came here to Oslo for The Snowman (based on Jo Nesbø's book), it resulted in absolute failure. I wish he'd find the time and resources to redo it, but there's fat chance of such. Much of the filming took place in very close proximity to where I live, and it doesn't even succeed in capturing auras of the Schrøder restaurant, something you'll practically be able to do by just passing it in a damn bus.
    I have all of Jo Nesbo's Harry Hole books, so was excited when I first heard they were making The Snowman. BUt you are right' the movie fails to do the job well and you do not get the atmospherics of Hole's life and where he lives and what he faces. Opportunity lost.
    I'm not lazy. I just work so fast I'm always done.

  16. #191
    Member hippypants's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    1,711
    Harry Hole? Yeah, that is quite the name to drop on your protagonist, eh?

  17. #192
    "Room For Rent" was one I liked. Minimalist. Realistic.

  18. #193
    Harry Hole? Yeah, that is quite the name to drop on your protagonist, eh?
    Well, it's Scandinavian crime fiction, so it is pronounced Harry hoo-lee.
    I'm not lazy. I just work so fast I'm always done.

  19. #194
    Member hippypants's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    1,711
    Quote Originally Posted by Dana5140 View Post
    Well, it's Scandinavian crime fiction, so it is pronounced Harry hoo-lee.
    Well, there's at least that.

  20. #195
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    The Planet Lovetron
    Posts
    11,495
    Quote Originally Posted by Dana5140 View Post
    Well, it's Scandinavian crime fiction, so it is pronounced Harry hoo-lee.
    Does the character frequent wild Irish drinking parties?

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •