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Thread: Wobbler

  1. #376
    Member chalkpie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Garyhead View Post
    Been listening to this on earbuds and auto stereo since it arrived.....I thought, Meh.....Last night, I put it on the big Home Stereo and WOW! It was like a whole different release! I do hear some Yes and Gentle Giant.....and Riverside! But, Mostly I hear Wobbler.

    Will spend some more time with this over the next week on the Big Unit......Also with Transitus......Fall is here.....get out the Scotch...start a fire in the fireplace and discover new Prog! The BEST way to sit out a Pandemic.
    Excellent. I have the vinyl but haven't cleaned/played it yet. I dig it on headphones but I need the family to step out for a moment to properly crank this thing. Yes to fall, scotch, fires, etc
    If it isn't Krautrock, it's krap.

    "And it's only the giving
    That makes you what you are" - Ian Anderson

  2. #377
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    A couple of spins in now, and I am really liking this one. I don't really hear that much Jon in his voice. He just sings in a similar range. Bob Drake (Thinking Plague, 5UUs) or Phil Naro (Druckfarben), sound a lot more like Jon to me. He doesn't quite have the power to carry the odd heavier passages in the music, which could use it, but other than that, I like his vocals just fine.

    This is a really solid album from top-to-bottom, to my ears. Not a weak track in the bunch. The first twos songs are sturdy prog work outs, with lots of emphasis on keys. I'm surprised that the third track, Naiad Dreams hasn't gotten more love, as I think it's a great song, with a nice melody and some beautiful acoustic guitar on it. Merry Macabre is a monster of a closer, with much more emphasis on guitar and it's loaded with killer riffs. A very satisfying finish.

    Of course, it is very reminiscent of 70s prog, but I don't hear the references being as overt, as on some previous releases. Even if the sound isn't new, the songs are, and if you think that there is still more to be said in the realm of 70s, symphonic prog, then there is a lot to like on this album.

    neil

  3. #378
    Listening again now, after laying it off for two weeks.

    It's a good album. But it's very much an experience of "sameness" and thus a question of whether or not you'll want more of what you've already had - or not. I suppose it's catering to the motion of imagining Your Fave Artist having done yet one more of your fave title - one more Selling England, one more Close to the Edge pr Per Un Amico, or one more Rotter's Club. After distilling and digesting for some time, the main impression is that of fairly moderate movement within an already out-defined mode of expression.

    It's the pendulum clock-complex; by definition we know what it is, but the incentive of purchase and amendment is usually one of very differing motives and emotions. Still, it only tells the time in the fashion of that very intended action.

    Back in the golden days, "sympho-lympho" lasted for a few handful of years of general contemporary development, then went out of favour due to natural and organic cultural mechanics of deviation in time and space. This "retro-symph" thing has now been enduring nearly 30 years of fine recovery (since Landberk and the likes were chasing "genuinity in 'prog' spirit and antic"), but it can only stay the same in terms of sub-aesthetic relevance for oh-so-long before seriously going out of interest with even its most ardent followers. And in contrast to what some folks appear to be assuming, this also goes for so-called "avant-prog" reassessments of artistic and musical importance. Those motions of charge simply aren't pulling the same strings of artistic poignancy any more.

    Bands like Wobbler, Panzerpappa, even the Jaga Jazzists and/or Motorpsychos, should transform their craft and identity by task of analysis as to whom and what is happening in western society today. They could make records with shorter tunes, more or less vocals, other traits etc. Just, for goodness' sake, keep developing, evolving and progressing.

    That's what art is and always was in the face of doom and destruction.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  4. #379
    Quote Originally Posted by miamiscot View Post
    I cannot get "Merry Macabre" out of my head. Every day for the past week. That damned song is super stuck in my head
    This is where it gets tricky, because I basically agree - to the point where I'm left with the question of whether we've all somehow "misunderstood" the fundamental concept of bands like Wobb.

    The "conventional" logic of interpreting artistic representations like Wobbler's is indeed that of the classic (Aristotlean) mimesis function - which by definition implies a level of receptionist consciousness or knowledge - but I'm not so sure anymore about Wobbler. When Dungen first appeared on the international scene, they very obviously broke with this pattern of cultural reception and established their own logic of pretense as regarded historical recreation, whereby inviting a recension strictly on its own contemporary terms. And I have come to believe that this is perhaps what Lars and the Wopps are now attempting with their recent output; what if we gave a short shit about the classics and rather just attempted to receive and digest the sound for what it makes?

    To that end, "Merry Macabre" and especially its exquisite ending garners full-house acclamation.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  5. #380
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    And I have come to believe that this is perhaps what Lars and the Wopps are now attempting with their recent output; what if we gave a short shit about the classics and rather just attempted to receive and digest the sound for what it makes?
    I am pretty sure that this is the case. There is some sort of innocence in Dwellers of the Deep in my opinion, which is not present in Rites of Dawn - this last one is clearly more self-conscious in its intentions.
    But in order for this sort of argument to be convincing to others, to allow others to participate in the same forgetfulness and innocence, one need to excel in terms of the energy involved in making the music, to really abandon all pretense that this is new, to take the whole concept to extremes. Wobbler was closer to this in From Silence to Somewhere than in this latest.

    In my opinion bands like Maschera di Cera and Ring Van Mobius did way better this year in this respect. But of course the most obvious example is MrBungle's latest record. It's like erasing whatever happened in music in the last 35 years, and with a completely unexpected gesture to offer "retro" record that defies any developments in music and at the same time destroys the retro concept because it presents itself as "better" than anything that came from the scene then. And therefore, it is a development on its own merit.

    But of course this works only because of the immense quantities of energy and passion that these guys invested in the project.

  6. #381
    Member chalkpie's Avatar
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    I agree Richard....its like having a great meal of the same cuisine I know I love. The entire LP artwork, etc its all good stuff and the olde school aspect is too enticing to pass up. I will autobuy their next one too.

  7. #382
    Quote Originally Posted by boilk View Post
    I'm surprised that the third track, Naiad Dreams hasn't gotten more love, as I think it's a great song, with a nice melody and some beautiful acoustic guitar on it.
    Side 2 is where to go, I think.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  8. #383
    Quote Originally Posted by boilk View Post
    I'm surprised that the third track, Naiad Dreams hasn't gotten more love, as I think it's a great song, with a nice melody and some beautiful acoustic guitar on it.
    I love the first minute and a half. A lot. But I don't like their decision for the key change at: "Listen to the voices of the Naiad girls. Dancing by the pool where the mighty [key change]river swirls." Just uncomfortable and ugly.

    And it doesn't feel like much of standalone song. Makes me wonder if it wouldn't have done better as part of a larger song.


  9. #384
    Member since March 2004 mozo-pg's Avatar
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    I bought the one Dwellers CD for myself and one for a friend. It has not arrived since Oct 23 so I contacted the band's website. Two CD's on their way from Norway (instead of Spain).
    What can this strange device be? When I touch it, it brings forth a sound.

  10. #385
    At this point, I'm really only listening to "By the Banks" and "Five Rooms" in my regular music rotations. Both feel like they could have been on Rites at Dawn, especially "By the Banks."

    "Merry Macabre" still feels like a bunch of half-baked pretty good ideas haphazardly strung together. There's nothing there demanding my attention from beginning to end.

  11. #386
    Member chalkpie's Avatar
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    https://wobbler.bandcamp.com/album/demo-2003

    The original demos are now available for purchase via Bandcamp....you know those two tunes.

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