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Thread: Israeli prog-rock and jazz-rock recommendations?

  1. #26

    Avner Kenner track and great fusion album by his son, Eitan

    Hi again,

    Though not an album (or even part of an album I believe), I thought some folks might enjoy this classic prog track from Avner Kenner:



    Also, on a related note, Eitan Kenner (Avner's son) released a great fusion album a while back called 8Ball City:

    https://kennermusic.bandcamp.com/album/8ball-city

    Eitan had already moved to the USA when he recorded and released the album, which is why I hadn't initially thought to include it.

    Cheers,


    Alan

  2. #27
    No Names - No Names is my favourite Israeli prog record, and I wholeheartedly recommend it.

  3. #28
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MIO Records View Post

    That's their only TV appearance that was never broadcasted and we saved at MIO:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Yp-FX_i9ME
    Incredible find. Thanks so much for posting.

  4. #29
    Happy you liked it....

    you will love this one i guess:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XH2e7sWFzy4

  5. #30

  6. #31
    Ten from me...

    Older: Zingale, No Names, Sheshet, Shlomo Ydov, Tamouz, Churchill's (psych)

    Newer: Sympozion, Musica Ficta, Sanhedrin, Ahvak

    EDIT: Actually I'll be a prog purist and swap out Churchill's for Atmosphera.
    Last edited by smcfee; 2 Weeks Ago at 04:01 PM.
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  7. #32
    Yuval Ron and Residents Of The Future are fusion.
    Nili Brosh plays in various genres. Great guitarist.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  8. #33
    Some pretty interesting remarks on the subject herehttps://www.progressiveears.org/foru...ight=Sanhedrin

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zeuhlmate View Post
    👍🏻
    Dan Maske

  10. #35

  11. #36
    For lovers of Ahvak- before this project Roy and Yishay had a very interesting project with a poet, Thin Lips, the music is all over the place- fron electronic to jazz to eastern to prog- I love this album and it showcases Roy's compositional skills very well:

    https://youtu.be/tI0tXdcJZYQ

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by flytomars View Post
    For lovers of Ahvak- before this project Roy and Yishay had a very interesting project with a poet, Thin Lips, the music is all over the place- fron electronic to jazz to eastern to prog- I love this album and it showcases Roy's compositional skills very well:

    https://youtu.be/tI0tXdcJZYQ
    Absolutely. I still pull that one out once in awhile. Great disc.

    Neil

  13. #38
    A cuppa threads with some information on Israeli progressive in general:

    https://www.progressiveears.org/foru...hlight=Sheshet

    https://www.progressiveears.org/foru...hlight=Sheshet

    https://www.progressiveears.org/foru...hlight=sussita


    There's surprisingly much interesting rock creativity to be had from Israel if you dig in, although it's my distinct impression that they come and go in natural waves of sorts. I wrote a rather extensive article on it for a mag some 15 years back, and was simply astonished at the number of artists and releases somewhat tantamount to "prog" in Israel already from the very early 70s and on - with the usual dry season from the mid-80s onto the mid-90s.

    Such a lot of fine stuff.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  14. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by Zappathustra View Post
    Some pretty interesting remarks on the subject herehttps://www.progressiveears.org/foru...ight=Sanhedrin
    Sorry; only saw this just now.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  15. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by smcfee View Post
    EDIT: Actually I'll be a prog purist and swap out Churchill's for Atmosphera.
    That Atmosphera MIO release is very good of course, and definitely an important archival lecture.

    The thing about the Churchill's reputation was not only that they appeared early (summer '68 for the album) and pretty much without tentative precedent in Israeli pop music, but for the melodic quality so evident as well as obvious seeds of influence (Yardbirds, Pretty Things, The Doors) and highly creative visions in production, sound effects and instrumentation.

    I was still a 60s psych fanatic on obtaining it in '89 (the illegit issue on Fantazia), and frankly couldn't believe how wonderfully solid and just distinguished the whole thing appeared - as if a bunch of determined dopehead dudes had indeed traveled back in time to make a 'long-lost' definitive artifact of acid bliss-songs based on intimate acquaintance of feel and style. It may not be as innovatively idiosyncratic or radically culture-laden (albeit dosaged with feats of Mizrahi in "Subsequent Finale") as anything by Os Mutantes or Groep 1850, but a reminiscent degree of freaky possession numbs sceneries in each and every tune here.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  16. #41
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    Sorry; only saw this just now.
    you're the one usually referenceing these older threads, but thought I had to substitute since you weren't around

  17. #42
    Just discovered the Fourteen Octaves album, which ought to be of interest here. Yoni Rechter and Avner Kenner collaborated to make this album. As with the aforementioned Shlomo Gronich album, not consistently prog, but there’s more than enough to satisfy and be of interest. Really, how could a project fronted by TWO keyboard players not at least be a little prog?
    Confirmed Bachelors: the dramedy hit of 1883...

  18. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by Progbear View Post
    Just discovered the Fourteen Octaves album, which ought to be of interest here. Yoni Rechter and Avner Kenner [...] not consistently prog, but there’s more than enough to satisfy and be of interest. Really, how could a project fronted by TWO keyboard players not at least be
    If I'm not entirely mistaken they also handle other instruments between them but mainly pianos, a bit of organ and assorted toy keyboards. Zohar Levi from psych-hard-rockers Apocalypse (with whom he played alongside Yitzhak Klepter from The Churchill's a.o.) is the drummer.

    From what I understand, Yoni Rechter wanted to record a couple of songs that he'd initially written and arranged for Arik Einstein (THE most popular Israeli singer/songwriter ever, whose backing-group in the late 60s was indeed The Churchill's) but which the latter eventually discarded. Rechter was obviously known from Kaveret (aka Poogies), esteemed for their layered and theatrical, sometimes satirical and often eccentric cabaret pop/rock. While there's some faint echoes of this on the 14 Ocatavas album too, notably the odd drop of vaudeville-like antic and farce, the end result totals not that of an eclectic collection of tunes or ideas but rather a kind of whimsical or even unworkable potpourri. Some very interesting dispositions here and there (making it worthwhile for completists), but when they go all-out tiresome blues-balladry I have a hard time following.

    To my ears, the Nonames (Ktzat Acheret) album masterfully merges separate disparate traces, styles and domains of music on a far more integral level, conjuring up a concoction unlike anything else I've heard on one plate; chamber-folk intricacy, klezmer undertones, "symphonic" pop/rock, cabaret (again) or juggler's sensibilities - and all of it tracted through a most inviting mood. The joy of fulfilling and achieving runs a red thread throughout.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  19. #44
    Quote Originally Posted by MIO Records View Post
    Maybe it's just me, but I rather see the names of the groups and musicians mentioned in posts, rather than to click on the links to discover who are meant. By mentioning the names you also make sure your posts will be selected when using the search-functions of the site.

  20. #45
    cunning linguist 3LockBox's Avatar
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    How about Telegraph? Been listening to their Mir album for the last couple of days. Very well done retro vibe Camel-esque prog. Some vocals, mostly instrumental. I like it.
    Compact Disk brought high fidelity to the masses and audiophiles will never forgive it for that

  21. #46
    Israeli prog has to have flute. If not, then it Isn't.

  22. #47
    Ahvak

    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Maske View Post
    ����
    It doesn't suck!

  23. #48

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