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Thread: Regrets, Ive had a few. Problem albums

  1. #26
    Member Digital_Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JKL2000 View Post
    There was one song that was pretty cool. but I think it might have been a b-side only, called "Sex Mad Roar."
    Yeah, that wasn't on the album proper. Apparently(just looking it up now) it was a bonus track on a 12 inch or something like that (or some kind of b-side like you said).
    You can't take a photograph of Uzis on a street corner.

  2. #27
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    Theres the Beatle album that was pulled from the shelves because of the cover photo.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yesterday_and_Today

  3. #28
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
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    Progbear, all of our lives would have been better without seeing those Village People videos.

  4. #29
    Re: Music From The Elder

    Quote Originally Posted by Progbear View Post
    Its impossible not to think of it as a bomb but yeah, I kind of like it too. That said, there is one aspect of the album which does not work at all, and thats the concept. Its so half-baked. Its like they had the sketch of an outline, [BOY] joins [SECRET SOCIETY] to fight [EVIL], yet forgot to fill in the blanks. And they were going to make a movie out of this? That must have been some grade A coke!
    Well, the narrative isn't quite there, and if you'll recall, the album ends with a spoken word piece, where Morpheus talks of having trained the boy, which sounds like they've left half way through. I've heard there were supposed to be more spoken word pieces on the record that were to tell more of the story (that's why Chris Makepeace's name is mentioned in the liner notes, because apparently, he was supposed to play the boy), which the record company cut (as well as swapping the songs around, to "emphasize" the singles, which was stupid because you had the album opening with The Oath, followed by the Fanfare, which was obviously intended to be the first track). I've also heard that it was supposed to be a double LP, but the label made them cut it down to one LP, and if it did well enough, then they'd release the second half. Well, you know how that went!

    As for the movie, I remember hearing someone was actually doing a movie realization about 10 or so years ago, but since it was unauthorized, they almost certainly weren't going to be allowed to use the actual songs in it. Hence, it would be the only movie in history to not use it's own soundtrack.

    The reimagined, SCA-inspired costume designs were also a complete misfire. But musically, I think its a good album, better than Dynasty or Unmasked at least.
    SCA?! What's that? I remember Paul Stanley saying he looked like he was in an "evil version of Duran Duran". I liked Ace's costume.

    While I think it's a decent record, I don't think it's better than Dynasty or Unmasked. Unmasked remains one of my favourite Kiss albums,and Dynasty is a commendable record that gets dismissed on the basis of one song.


    And while were on the subject of the Casablanca-label stable of artists, and ill-conceived costume changes, I have to bring up the Village Peoples totally risible Renaissance:
    OH yeah, it was like someone in the Village People camp thought, "Gee, we need to totally overhaul our look" and had been reading about what was going on in England at the time, viz-a-viz the whole Blitz Kids/New Romantic thing (or mabye they had just seen David Bowie's Ashes To Ashes video) and thought "We gotta look like those guys!" It's interesting to note after that album tanked (as had the previous album/movie project, Can't Stop The Music...what kind of idiot writes a song called Can't Stop The Music?! I mean that's almost like a dare, like "Ya wanna bet?!"), they reverted to their original look on their next album (not that I knew about anything post Can't Stop The Music at the time, as it seemed that project just sort of put the kibosh on them getting any media attention whatsoever, for a few years) and stayed with it ever since.

  5. #30
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post

    SCA?! What's that?

    SCA = Society for Creative Anachronism. It's basically a LARPish take on the High Middle Ages.

  6. #31
    Indeed, the SCA precedes the concept of "LARPing," by a decade and more, having been founded (where else?) in Berkeley, CA, in 1966. At this point there are "Kingdoms" across the US and Canada, as well as one covering Enzedd, Oz, and part of Antarctica.

    I used to live half a block from a BART parking-lot where the local SCA chapter held practice one evening per week, after the commuters' cars had largely gone. It was fascinating to watch these folks whaling on each other with wooden swords, padded maces, and other semi-dangerous weapons, while wearing armor made from anything to loops of cord to actual steel. It frequently weirded-out passers-by.

    Around 1977*, I was told a story about some SCAdians (their name for themselves) who were walking together after a practice, when they were approached by an young thug who pulled a switchblade and said, "I got five inches of steel here." One of them pulled his sword from his cloak and said, "I'll see your five and raise you fifteen." A hole quickly appeared in the air where the would-be mugger had been.

    There was also a story circulating about a SCAdian who, before a practice, was approached by a cop, who accused him of breaking the length limit for a blade. The SCAdian tried to explain that it was a sword for a medieval re-enactment, which was going nowhere**, until the cop noticed that he was being slowly surrounded by people wearing armor and carrying various weapons. "Uh, all right," he said, and left.

    _________________________________________
    * Note that this was well before the release of Crocodile Dundee...
    ** Note that this was well before the release of Discipline...
    Yemen hardly ever exports cookies.

  7. #32
    John & Yoko "Two Virgins"

    Slightly problematic
    "Don't look here. The joke's in your hand."

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  8. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by ronmac View Post
    John & Yoko "Two Virgins"

    Slightly problematic
    The first three John & Yoko albums were very problematic, as was Some Time in New York City (just check out the title of the lead single to that one). All four were more about provocation than music.
    Confirmed Bachelors: the dramedy hit of 1883...

  9. #34
    Member rcarlberg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Progbear View Post
    The first three John & Yoko albums were very problematic, as was Some Time in New York City (just check out the title of the lead single to that one). All four were more about provocation than music.
    All four were about shedding the "rockstar skin" which had become too tight. No growth without change.

  10. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by Progbear View Post
    The first three John & Yoko albums were very problematic, as was Some Time in New York City (just check out the title of the lead single to that one). All four were more about provocation than music.
    One of John's best songs. It was a different time and, despite that word making it problematic, the song is 100% accurate and utterly brilliant. It's also one of his best vocals on a solo track.

    Some Time in NYC certainly does not belong in the same list as the three, especially if you think it was more about provocation than music, which I find laughable. Perhaps you just don't agree with him.
    "Don't look here. The joke's in your hand."

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  11. #36
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    ELP- Love Beach

    The band didn't want to do the album, but were contractually obligated.
    There is no producer credited.
    The running joke Carl Palmer says onstage at his ELP Legacy shows: "We recorded an album called "Love Beach"... sorry, there won't be any refunds."

  12. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by Gravedigger View Post
    ELP- Love Beach

    The band didn't want to do the album, but were contractually obligated.
    There is no producer credited.
    Didn't Keith actually apologize for that one when he was interviewed in Keyboard magazine soon afterward? He also said he didn't like the album title, and they even did a poll of people at an airport or something like that, asking them "Which of these sounds like an ELP album title?" or whatever.

  13. #38
    I recall a story of a musician(?) at an in-store signing and someone turned up with a copy of one of their less well received albums. He held up his hands and said "no refunds!".

  14. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by Halmyre View Post
    I recall a story of a musician(?) at an in-store signing and someone turned up with a copy of one of their less well received albums. He held up his hands and said "no refunds!".
    I can't find a citation, but that's supposedly Carl Palmer and the album in question was Love Beach. Personally, I believe the story.

    Bill

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Munster View Post
    I wonder too if, post 9/11, ‘Remain in Light’ would now get a release with the track Listening Wind: “Mojique sees his village from a nearby hill / Mojique thinks of days before Americans came … Mojique holds a package in his quivering hand / Mojique sends the package to the American man.”
    Well, Peter Gabriel covered it in 2010 and got away with it (fantastic cover!) but maybe the fact that it was a vintage piece changed the calculation.

    Quote Originally Posted by ronmac View Post
    One of John's best songs. It was a different time and, despite that word making it problematic, the song is 100% accurate and utterly brilliant. It's also one of his best vocals on a solo track.
    Yeah I can see why it would be a hard listen today. I suspect it was a hard listen in 1972, though I wasn't around. Still, an absolutely daring and confrontational piece of art, trying to make a heartfelt point in the most vivid way possible.

  16. #41
    Quote Originally Posted by EBES View Post
    Yeah I can see why it would be a hard listen today. I suspect it was a hard listen in 1972, though I wasn't around. Still, an absolutely daring and confrontational piece of art, trying to make a heartfelt point in the most vivid way possible.
    Yet, he performed it live on TV and survived.
    "Don't look here. The joke's in your hand."

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  17. #42
    Quote Originally Posted by Sputnik View Post
    I can't find a citation, but that's supposedly Carl Palmer and the album in question was Love Beach. Personally, I believe the story.

    Bill
    When I saw Carl Palmer circa 2006 or 2007, there was a point in the show where he starts talking about Love Beach. He begins by saying, "And then there are some albums that you're not as proud of...I think you know I mean, the one where we're like this on the cover..." and assumes the arms akimbo posture that Greg and Keith have on the cover. That happened to be one of the records I brought for him to sign, so I held it up, and he looks over, and without missing a beat, points and says "I'm sorry, there are no refunds!". I don't know if he said something similar at every show, but the "no refunds" thing definitely happened at my show.

  18. #43
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    Realizing that this is a minority view on this site (especially from a sociological perspective), but musically and lyrically, these Lennon albums with Ono (other than Double Fantasy) were dismal flops and really of subterranean quality.

  19. #44
    Quote Originally Posted by SunRunner2 View Post
    Realizing that this is a minority view on this site (especially from a sociological perspective), but musically and lyrically, these Lennon albums with Ono (other than Double Fantasy) were dismal flops and really of subterranean quality.
    I think SiNYC is definitely much stronger lyrically than it is musically. It was a reflection of the times.
    "Don't look here. The joke's in your hand."

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  20. #45
    Quote Originally Posted by SunRunner2 View Post
    Realizing that this is a minority view on this site (especially from a sociological perspective), but musically and lyrically, these Lennon albums with Ono (other than Double Fantasy) were dismal flops and really of subterranean quality.
    If you are talking of the Two Virgins/Life With The Lions/Wedding Album trilogy, I'd be surprised if there are many fans of those here.

    I bought Life With The Lions when I found an LP relatively cheap. The first side is sort of interesting, but after a while the screams and feedback leaves me thinking, "ok, I get it. Time for something else."

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by ronmac View Post
    Yet, he performed it live on TV and survived.
    I suppose you couldn't get it on TV today. HBO maybe.

  22. #47
    Member rcarlberg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pb2015 View Post
    If you are talking of the Two Virgins/Life With The Lions/Wedding Album trilogy, I'd be surprised if there are many fans of those here.

    I bought Life With The Lions when I found an LP relatively cheap. The first side is sort of interesting, but after a while the screams and feedback leaves me thinking, "ok, I get it. Time for something else."
    They're not albums you LISTEN to. They're albums you COLLECT.

  23. #48
    Quote Originally Posted by rcarlberg View Post
    They're not albums you LISTEN to. They're albums you COLLECT.
    "One should never magnify the harsh light of reality with the mirror of prose onto the delicate wings of fantasy's butterfly"
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  24. #49
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    Shampoohorn by Z. I understand the European and American versions are not the same. Changes were made in the interim of their respective releases.

  25. #50
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    Sometime In NYC...yeah, I don't like it. I think Yoko's 'Sisters O Sisters' and 'We're All Water' are better than the Lennon tracks on there really. Some of the lyrics like 'Luck Of The Irish' are awful ('the British brigands, Goddamn' and 'Oirish' cliches like 'the world would be one big Blarney Stone' etc.).

    The live material on it is better, particularly the Zappa/Mothers jam.

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