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Thread: '78 - '82 amazing "era"

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    Member chalkpie's Avatar
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    '78 - '82 amazing "era"

    I did a search at PA for the top 200 albums made between 78 - 82, and the results are absolutely insane. We all know that we love the golden era (or eras), but just in these four years alone things were on the move, sometimes in a more interesting way.

    I've read so many times that by the end of the 70s/early 80s, things were getting stale, prog was on the way out, etc...bullshit! I don't see it. Things were very interesting and influences were even more wide-ranging by this time. The Recommended Sampler (1982) isn't even listed here, nor are XTC or The Police. I could probably spend the next year or two just sticking to this list, and be more than thrilled and amazed.

    http://www.progarchives.com/top-prog...&x=92&y=7#list
    Last edited by chalkpie; 06-10-2022 at 10:25 PM.
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    Member StarThrower's Avatar
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    I counted 44 albums I have from that list. And I thought of several others I own that are not listed.

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    Member Joe F.'s Avatar
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    I own 166 of those and enjoy most of them.

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    Quite an intriguing list; which we rarely think about since so many critics (and even fans) declared Prog dead at the 1975-1977 timeframe, when Punk Rock took hold in the UK, and then spread worldwide. Of course, if you're not a Rush fan the top 3 don't hold sway for the purpose of this list (but who cares). However, to further emphasize the significance of the 1978-1982 music scene and its importance, the PA listing doesn't include a good number of so-called New Age releases and artists, which were also inspired by the Prog movement and many had their birth in that genre.

    Albums such as "Melt - PG3", "The Wall" and the Dixie Dregs "What If" seem out of place when juxtaposed with the likes of National Health, Eloy, Universe Zero and UK's debut. Many will disagree and, once again, this is what makes lists like these controversial and interesting at the same time.

    And then there's Klaus Schulze with his gem of a beauty "X", coming in at number 35, a full 32 places below "Permanent Waves". Oh, well, there's no accounting for taste, is there? (and I like Rush a whole bunch, but still...).

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    Good list, I own 66 albums from it and count many others I should own.

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    Member Zeuhlmate's Avatar
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    I own 55 of them.

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    I only bought one of those at the time (Renaissance) - and most were probably under my radar which was firmly fixed on the Jam, Clash, Vapors, Elvis Costello etc
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    Member chalkpie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SunRunner2 View Post
    Quite an intriguing list; which we rarely think about since so many critics (and even fans) declared Prog dead at the 1975-1977 timeframe, when Punk Rock took hold in the UK, and then spread worldwide. Of course, if you're not a Rush fan the top 3 don't hold sway for the purpose of this list (but who cares). However, to further emphasize the significance of the 1978-1982 music scene and its importance, the PA listing doesn't include a good number of so-called New Age releases and artists, which were also inspired by the Prog movement and many had their birth in that genre.

    Albums such as "Melt - PG3", "The Wall" and the Dixie Dregs "What If" seem out of place when juxtaposed with the likes of National Health, Eloy, Universe Zero and UK's debut. Many will disagree and, once again, this is what makes lists like these controversial and interesting at the same time.

    And then there's Klaus Schulze with his gem of a beauty "X", coming in at number 35, a full 32 places below "Permanent Waves". Oh, well, there's no accounting for taste, is there? (and I like Rush a whole bunch, but still...).
    I think the order is irrelevant imo, but rather the lot taken as a whole is what's so impressive. "Ranking" 200 albums in some coherent order is futile.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by chalkpie View Post
    I did a search at PA for the top 200 albums made between 78 - 82, and the results are absolutely insane. We all know that we love the golden era (or eras), but just in these four years alone things were on the move, sometimes in a more interesting way.

    I've read so many times that by the end of the 70s/early 80s, things were getting stale, prog was on the way out, etc...bullshit! I don't see it. Things were very interesting and influences were even more wide-ranging by this time. The Recommended Sampler (1982) isn't even listed here, nor are XTC or The Police. I could probably spend the next year or two just sticking to this list, and be more than thrilled and amazed.

    http://www.progarchives.com/top-prog...&x=92&y=7#list
    No argument from me. I own quite a few from the list and there are plenty more from those years that I think are fabulous.

    Fun list you generated! Will probably inspire me to break out a few things that normally are just off my radar
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  10. #10
    Member Zeuhlmate's Avatar
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    The list reflects a certain fatigue with speedy guitarist and symph keyboardplayers with capes.

    Luckily not every new band played Punk, New Wave, or Synth Pop.

  11. #11
    Member mnprogger's Avatar
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    counted maybe 30 of them I own or enjoy.

    Good records certainly, some of my favorites/#1 records from them. I wouldn't necessarily say it's as great of 5-year stretch as others, but it's all relative.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by SunRunner2 View Post
    Quite an intriguing list; which we rarely think about since so many critics (and even fans) declared Prog dead at the 1975-1977 timeframe, when Punk Rock took hold in the UK, and then spread worldwide. Of course, if you're not a Rush fan the top 3 don't hold sway for the purpose of this list (but who cares). However, to further emphasize the significance of the 1978-1982 music scene and its importance, the PA listing doesn't include a good number of so-called New Age releases and artists, which were also inspired by the Prog movement and many had their birth in that genre.

    Albums such as "Melt - PG3", "The Wall" and the Dixie Dregs "What If" seem out of place when juxtaposed with the likes of National Health, Eloy, Universe Zero and UK's debut. Many will disagree and, once again, this is what makes lists like these controversial and interesting at the same time.

    And then there's Klaus Schulze with his gem of a beauty "X", coming in at number 35, a full 32 places below "Permanent Waves". Oh, well, there's no accounting for taste, is there? (and I like Rush a whole bunch, but still...).
    Ponty's Civilized Evil is at #199! I hope that's not a true ranking.

  13. #13
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    I had 29 on the list, thanks to some tasty spanish prog inclusions

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  14. #14
    20: but music has always been my second love. If I spent as much on music as I do on books I would probably have about 50 of them.
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    I'm up around 80.....
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  16. #16
    Insect Overlord Progatron's Avatar
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    I have 83 of those on my shelves. Of course, the Zappas, Phillips, and Hammills help get the number up there, but I'm happy to also report some other favourites of mine like Shylock, Arachnoid, CAN, Cathedral, etc.

    Tons of great stuff on that list.
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    I've got 67 of 'em. It is a nice list to remind us that there was really a lot of good stuff out there. And I'm surprised some of my "mainstream prog" favorites of the era aren't even on the list: Tormato, &TTW3, Azure d'Or, A; Duke wasn't even on there. I would guess they get downgraded because they are maybe not as good as what came before by the same bands. If they were debuts they might have done better....

  18. #18
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
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    I +/- stopped counting halfway through, but I guess I must own around 50 of them and there are another 15 that I maybe should own (but not the UK albums )

    I can't help to wonder how many albums of the PA 78/82 list would still be in my 67-82 top 200 list, though.

    But I've never really thought of the 78/82 era as bad either, thoyugh it's clear that the Big 6 or 7 were definitely on a downward slide (I don't think any of those Big 6/7 albums should find a space in that Top 150 - yup, even Discipline and Horses).

    I've checked a few months back my Gnosis account, and indeed, every new year from 78 onwards, I have a harder time finding as many albums I really like than the previous one (only 79 is superior is an exception)
    83/4 is where things are getting really scarce and from 85 until 91, it's almost a desert
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from drug-addicts to complete nutcases.

  19. #19
    I own 28. Would like ten more. The diversity and quality surprised me.

  20. #20
    Member Steve F.'s Avatar
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    I have 55. 1978-84 was a very busy period if you were into the various RIO and post RIO strains from Europe and interesting things were also beginning to bubbleup from Japan.
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  21. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by chalkpie View Post
    I've read so many times that by the end of the 70s/early 80s, things were getting stale, prog was on the way out, etc...bullshit! I don't see it. Things were very interesting and influences were even more wide-ranging by this time.
    I counted 57 that I own. It's a decent list, but as someone pointed out earlier, it does sort of feel a bit like the "changing of the guard." There's no Genesis or ELP there at all. Heavy Horses is there, but no Stormwatch, A, or Broadsword. Discipline is there but not Beat. Drama is there, but not Tormato. The Wall is there, but that's a somewhat polarizing record.

    The point being, the presence of the big name "touchstone" bands is diminished, and somewhat spotty. I think this was what people were referring to when they said things were getting a "little stale." That doesn't mean great music wasn't still being made, but for those acclimated to great music of a certain style coming from that cluster of well-known, largely British bands along with those who came in their wake, this period does represent a time of change. The fact that you have to "range more widely" to find it is indicative of this change.

    The truth is, "Progressive Rock" as it had come to be defined and understood by a majority of listeners during the 70s, was on it's way out during this time, and by 83 or so, it's all but vanished. Did high quality music come in and fill the void? Depends on your tastes.

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  22. #22
    About 60 I have. Interesting times.

  23. #23
    Member chalkpie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe F. View Post
    I own 166 of those and enjoy most of them.
    Wow, very nice!

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    23. Lots of interesting stuff, agreed. I don't have more interest in this era than the 'golden age', or new stuff, but it is more varied than I would have expected.

    Neil

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    One thing is for sure: despite owning 66 out of the 200 and having listened to many more (e.g., I really like the Peter Gabriel albums of the era, but never had them in any format), the good thing of this list is for me is to remind me to check albums that I've only known by name and/or reputation. Interestingly, I started to do this top down and the first 'novelty/unknown' albums for me (SBB, Los Jaivas, José Cid) didn't really resonate. Lots of homework to do, anyway.

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