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Thread: You love the band but have burned out on overplayed songs

  1. #51
    Quote Originally Posted by the winter tree View Post
    I still really like the original recording of Roundabout. But I have never liked the live versions very much.
    Different strokes... I find most studio Yes terminally dull, but love the Yessongs version of "Roundabout" ... well, of just about everything on it. (The big exception to the "studio rule" is Relayer, which is still fresh and cristp after all these years.)
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  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by UnephenStephen View Post
    Smoke On the Water


    Many years ago, my friend dub this the 'bad luck song" and ever since then if I do listen to it; something bad does happen to me! (Sadly, I love the Made in Japan version..... )

    As soon as I hear those first 3 notes, I change the channel or fast-forward. I haven't heard it in decades.

  3. #53
    Member Paulrus's Avatar
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    Someone recently used "Every Breath You Take" on a YT reaction channel, and I actually enjoyed it. It was one of those "instantly overplayed" songs when it came out, but it's been so long since radio died that I hadn't heard it in ages.

    But the one song I'm actually now wondering might fall into the "played to death" category is "Running Up That Hill".
    I'm holding out for the Wilson-mixed 5.1 super-duper walletbuster special anniversary extra adjectives edition.

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paulrus View Post
    Someone recently used "Every Breath You Take" on a YT reaction channel, and I actually enjoyed it. It was one of those "instantly overplayed" songs when it came out, but it's been so long since radio died that I hadn't heard it in ages.

    But the one song I'm actually now wondering might fall into the "played to death" category is "Running Up That Hill".
    Same for me with Every Breath, actually. I happened to be listening to that disc in the Police box set the other day and was in the other room when it came on so I couldn't run and press the skip button, and realized I was actually enjoying it. Neat subtly technical riff, searching melancholy melody, smartly creepy lyric. Nice to be able to appreciate it again.

  5. #55
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    The solution to this dilemma for me, has been pretty straight-forward: there is so much great music being made in the last couple of years, that I rarely have the time or inclination to listen to over-played classics. Once in a blue moon, at best, for something like Supper's Ready...as great as it is.

    Neil

  6. #56
    Member PixelDelirium's Avatar
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    Yeah... Roundabout. Easily the one song I've heard played the most live. Yes played it every single freakin' time I've seen them since 1994 (about 12 times). Asia played it on their first reunion tour (saw that 4 times). Circa played it (RoSfest). Saw Yoso play it. Saw Jon Anderson with the School of Rock play it. I think I've seen at least one Yes tribute band play it at some point. I'm officially sick of hearing Roundabout.

  7. #57
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    A few of mine already mentioned, two more for me -

    Genesis - TLLDOB
    Genesis - Carpet Crawlers

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  8. #58
    I'm hoping the new and improved live PT drop the seemingly indispensable Lazarus.

  9. #59
    Quote Originally Posted by PixelDelirium View Post
    Yeah... Roundabout. Easily the one song I've heard played the most live. Yes played it every single freakin' time I've seen them since 1994 (about 12 times). Asia played it on their first reunion tour (saw that 4 times). Circa played it (RoSfest). Saw Yoso play it. Saw Jon Anderson with the School of Rock play it...
    Hell, a band at one of my High School dances played it. Left out the instrumental interludes though. Grrr.
    Yemen hardly ever exports cookies.

  10. #60
    Quote Originally Posted by pbs1902 View Post
    Many years ago, my friend dub this the 'bad luck song" and ever since then if I do listen to it; something bad does happen to me!
    There's an episode in The Sopranos where Tony is listening to Smoke on the water. The cassette gets stuck and he crashes the car. 🤣

  11. #61
    I think this phenomenon (overkill in relation to some bands, albums or songs) is exclusive to people like us, "progressive" music fans (for lack of a better term), who do active and deep listening. The vast majority of people -the people that listen to radio (classic rock stations or whatever) or do streaming (YouTube, Spotify, etc.)- don't listen to music that way. To them, music is just a nice background for doing something else (running, working, etc.). The thing with us -who do very conscious listening- is that we get very familiar with the music we listen to. We get all the details, nuances, the role of every instrument, the different sections, etc. So, there's a moment when we know everything about it. From there on, we don't get any emotion of it, because the suprise element is gone. That doesn't happen at all to the rest of the people. That's why they can listen to the same artist or band for a lifetime or they can listen to the same song a zillion times.
    I got burned out with Iron Maiden (everything up to Fear of the dark), The Beatles (everything), Queen (everything), Black Sabbath (everything up to Born again + Dehumanizer), Deep Purple (everything up to Come taste the band), Pink Floyd (everything except Endless river), Yes (everything up to Drama), Genesis (everything up to Wind and wuthering) and King Crimson (everything up to Red). So, there are certain albums of these bands that I still can listen to with enjoyment. But, generally, it's not their best albums, which is frustrating.
    Sometimes, listening to some songs in a different context helps, I don't know why. For instance, when it suddenly pops up in a playlist made by someone else or if you are listening to music in shuffle mode. In those cases, sometimes the old thrill comes back.
    An alternate or live version that differs considerably from the studio version also can make the trick. An interesting cover version can also be quite effective.
    As someone else in this thread did, I stopped listening at all to some of these bands for 10-20 years and that made me enjoy them again, even their classic albums and more known songs.
    My approach to listening music, when a new album comes out, is: I listen to it 3-4 times (not continously, but in a period of 2 weeks approximately) and then I shelve it. That's the number of times I can listen to an album without getting sick of it. I know that the next time I listen actively to it (in a couple of months) I will still enjoy it.
    But when we were young and cassettes and CDs were so expensive and there was no Internet, we had few cassettes and CDs. That's why we overplayed the same bands, albums and songs. If I had known I was going to get bored of my favourite bands, I wouldn't have overplayed them.
    And my general approach to listening to music is listening to old favourites and to new bands equally, familiar genres (prog, classic rock, etc.) and non familiar genres (electronica, hip hop) equally, non familiar albums by old favourites and famous albums by non familiar bands equally, etc. This approach has worked pretty well for me.

  12. #62
    Member Paulrus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Progtastic View Post
    I'm hoping the new and improved live PT drop the seemingly indispensable Lazarus.
    That honor for me belongs to "Trains".
    I'm holding out for the Wilson-mixed 5.1 super-duper walletbuster special anniversary extra adjectives edition.

  13. #63
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    I listened to Discipline, Beat & Three of a Perfect Pair so much that I took a long break from those albums & I didnít want to lose the magic. Aside from the instrumentals on Beat & TOAPP, Discipline is the only one that I can return to now and again.


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  14. #64
    "Roundabout" should've worn me out by now but it just moves as a song and I just don't get tired of the groove. "I've Seen All Good People" I can do without. I've heard it enough.
    No matter what anyone says, you are the decider of how you will listen to music.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pbs1902 View Post
    Many years ago, my friend dub this the 'bad luck song" and ever since then if I do listen to it; something bad does happen to me! (Sadly, I love the Made in Japan version..... )

    As soon as I hear those first 3 notes, I change the channel or fast-forward. I haven't heard it in decades.
    In high school two of my friends got into separate (not serious) car accidents and in both cases the song that was playing on the radio at the time was Zeppelin's "All of my Love." To this day, almost 40 years later, if that song comes on the radio while I'm driving I immediately change the station. Can't be too careful!

  16. #66
    ^^^ Agreed. In fact, if Led Zeppelin comes on at all I change the station. Caution is my watchword.
    Yemen hardly ever exports cookies.

  17. #67
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    I guess those of us who were into rock and pop in the eighties might relate to this. I was recently listening to Def Leppard's Hysteria album. I like the ones you never hear mainly because you never hear them. However, the so called "good" ones are hard to listen to because they have been played so much. There are so many good albums (much of which is classic rock) that have certain songs that have been played to death. The more popular the album (hysteria is just one example) the more overplayed songs they have.
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  18. #68
    Member Digital_Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sturgeon's Lawyer View Post
    ^^^ Agreed. In fact, if Led Zeppelin comes on at all I change the station. Caution is my watchword.
    I'm the same way. They were one of my very first "favorite" bands but they have been way overplayed. Some way overplayed songs I can still listen to for some reason (carry on wayward son for example) but it's hard for me to listen to most LZ. As a result I currently own only a few of their albums.
    You can't take a photograph of Uzis on a street corner.

  19. #69
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    I stopped listening to classic rock radio for the most part years and years ago -- the only time I would listen to music if someone else was in the car and picked the station, or if I didnt have the ability to be able to plug in a tape/CD/ipod/phone. Now a days most of the time my roommate and I will ride somewhere and we take turns playing tunes off our phones, but dumping that format did wonders for my sanity lol.

    That being said i would agree that maybe Roundabout is the most played tune in all of prog, at least the way different lineups have played that over the years, it at least has changed a little bit -- we got that acoustic shuffle version in 2004 for example, lol. That being said I can usually skip that song and be totally fine. Also totally fine with skipping Baba O'Riley, Bohemian Rhapsody, and Black Dog...
    Eagles may soar, but weasels don't get sucked into jet engines.

  20. #70
    No matter how much I don't like Metal where someone is yelling or growling at me, I still never get tired of Rage Against the Machine. Zach de la Rocha can yell at me all he wants. On the other hand (and also talking about Metal), if I never hear Guns 'n Roses again it'll be fine by me.
    No matter what anyone says, you are the decider of how you will listen to music.

  21. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Splicer View Post
    No matter how much I don't like Metal where someone is yelling or growling at me, I still never get tired of Rage Against the Machine. Zach de la Rocha can yell at me all he wants. On the other hand (and also talking about Metal), if I never hear Guns 'n Roses again it'll be fine by me.
    Totally agreed on G'n'R. The arc was oddly quick on them actually, from "man this stuff is wicked" to "God I never want to hear this dreadful buffoon again" so quickly that I spent a couple years loathing them before I realized I loathed them. I often wonder how I'd feel about their music if I heard it for the first time today, but I suppose infuriating omnipresence is so basic to the idea of Guns 'n' Roses that it's beyond imagining.

  22. #72
    Insect Overlord Progatron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Splicer View Post
    On the other hand (and also talking about Metal), if I never hear Guns 'n Roses again it'll be fine by me.
    I realize this is entirely unimportant, but I've never thought of Guns N' Roses as metal. They're really just a hard rock band who took their cues from bands like Aerosmith and Thin Lizzy, with an occasional punk flavour courtesy of Duff McKagen. They adopted the 'bad boys' image of Tyler & Perry or Jagger & Richards and dialed it up so that every publicity photo had them swilling straight from bottles of JD. But then Axl Rose would sit at the piano and deliver some syrupy, melodramatic ballad to counter some of the incredibly juvenile lyrics he wrote (see 'Get In The Ring' or 'One In A Million' for the most egregious examples).

    As for never wanting to hear them again, well I understand that.
    Interviewer of reprobate ne'er-do-well musicians of the long-haired rock n' roll persuasion at: www.velvetthunder.co.uk and former scribe at Classic Rock Society. Only vaguely aware of anything other than music.

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  23. #73
    Member Paulrus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Progatron View Post
    They adopted the 'bad boys' image of Tyler & Perry or Jagger & Richards and dialed it up so that every publicity photo had them swilling straight from bottles of JD.
    I always thought of them as an extension of the manufactured LA hair metal bands of the 80s. All image and style, with no substance. The overlap with the grunge scene didn't do them any favors. I recall back in the mid 90s doing a photo shoot at a San Francisco photographer's studio and Duff McKagan had just been through there doing a shoot for an amp manufacturer. Apparently bottles of JD were the main item on the catering order.
    I'm holding out for the Wilson-mixed 5.1 super-duper walletbuster special anniversary extra adjectives edition.

  24. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paulrus View Post
    I always thought of them as an extension of the manufactured LA hair metal bands of the 80s. All image and style, with no substance. The overlap with the grunge scene didn't do them any favors. I recall back in the mid 90s doing a photo shoot at a San Francisco photographer's studio and Duff McKagan had just been through there doing a shoot for an amp manufacturer. Apparently bottles of JD were the main item on the catering order.
    Definitely huge on image and style, but even looking back today on their music, I think they had a bit more going for them than those hair bands did. Certainly Slash came up with some good guitar parts/solos, and he was the one guy who continued to make music on a regular basis post-breakup while the rest of them barely did anything. Again, I roll my eyes at the melodrama of some of those ballads, and even more so at attempts at social commentary ('I don't need your Civil war, it feeds the rich while it buries the poor') but I can see why their music still resonates with some people today. I haven't listened to them in decades and have no desire to, but I wouldn't say they had no substance. At the very least, they had some energetic rockers with memorable melodies, even if that dingbat singing them became tiresome as quickly as he surely did.
    Interviewer of reprobate ne'er-do-well musicians of the long-haired rock n' roll persuasion at: www.velvetthunder.co.uk and former scribe at Classic Rock Society. Only vaguely aware of anything other than music.

    'The best stuff is really when Mick Pointer was a baby, banging on pots and pans. That was their most "out there" stuff.' - JKL2000

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