Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 77

Thread: Rock Versions of Classical Works & Prog

  1. #26
    Member TheH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    2,734

  2. #27

  3. #28
    Isn't ELP's Pictures at an Exhibition an adaptation of a classical piece?

  4. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by aksnitd View Post
    Isn't ELP's Pictures at an Exhibition an adaptation of a classical piece?
    Yes, most of it, I think.

  5. #30
    Most of the ELP version is from Mussorgski's "Pictures". But less than a quarter of the Mussorgski made it into the ELP version. Check out either the original (piano) version or Ravel's orchestration, both available in multiple versions on You2be.
    If a bird can speak, who once was a dinosaur,
    and a dog can dream
    should it be impossible
    that a man might supervise the construction of light?

  6. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by Sturgeon's Lawyer View Post
    Most of the ELP version is from Mussorgski's "Pictures". But less than a quarter of the Mussorgski made it into the ELP version. Check out either the original (piano) version or Ravel's orchestration, both available in multiple versions on You2be.
    I've also an orchestrations by Peter Breiner and by Sergej Gortschakow, a synthesizer version by Isao Tomita and rock versions by ELP and Stern Combo Meißen (which also contains Night on bare mountain and has some jazz elements)

  7. #32
    Member TheH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    2,734



  8. #33
    Member Steve F.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Fluffy Cloud
    Posts
    4,546
    The Muffins box will (finally) have a version of their piece, written by Mike Bass, called Bartok Stockpot, that includes Bartok’s ‘Bear Dance’ and ‘Two Romanian Dances’, IF I recall the names of the originals correctly.
    Steve F.

    www.waysidemusic.com
    www.cuneiformrecords.com

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    “Remember, if it doesn't say "Cuneiform," it's not prog!” - THE Jed Levin

    Any time any one speaks to me about any musical project, the one absolute given is "it will not make big money". [tip of the hat to HK]

    "Death to false 'support the scene' prog!"

    please add 'imo' wherever you like, to avoid offending those easily offended.

  9. #34
    Member Steve F.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Fluffy Cloud
    Posts
    4,546
    This is one of my VERY favorite rock band adaptations of a classical piece. I actually got to see them perform this on their one and only tour!

    I think that this is an amazing and inspiring transcription!



    Read the sad reason for the 15 second excerpts…..
    Steve F.

    www.waysidemusic.com
    www.cuneiformrecords.com

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    “Remember, if it doesn't say "Cuneiform," it's not prog!” - THE Jed Levin

    Any time any one speaks to me about any musical project, the one absolute given is "it will not make big money". [tip of the hat to HK]

    "Death to false 'support the scene' prog!"

    please add 'imo' wherever you like, to avoid offending those easily offended.

  10. #35
    Also check out Bad Plus's jazzish version

    If a bird can speak, who once was a dinosaur,
    and a dog can dream
    should it be impossible
    that a man might supervise the construction of light?

  11. #36
    Highly Evolved Orangutan JKL2000's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Westchester, NY
    Posts
    13,740
    Man, The Rite of Spring is a popular one. I haven't actually read this thread, so this may have been mentioned, but I have a CD called "Stravinsky - The Rite of Spring for Electric Guitar, Electric Bass and Percussion" by some guy named John Ringer.

    https://www.discogs.com/release/1956...And-Percussion
    Primary procreation is accomplished…

  12. #37
    Member Steve F.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Fluffy Cloud
    Posts
    4,546
    Quote Originally Posted by JKL2000 View Post
    Man, The Rite of Spring is a popular one. I haven't actually read this thread, so this may have been mentioned, but I have a CD called "Stravinsky - The Rite of Spring for Electric Guitar, Electric Bass and Percussion" by some guy named John Ringer.

    https://www.discogs.com/release/1956...And-Percussion
    We had 100 of this CD for sale @ the grand price of $1.00 each.

    When we sold out of them, we asked Mr Ringer for more, and he informed us that he had thrown the rest away!
    Steve F.

    www.waysidemusic.com
    www.cuneiformrecords.com

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    “Remember, if it doesn't say "Cuneiform," it's not prog!” - THE Jed Levin

    Any time any one speaks to me about any musical project, the one absolute given is "it will not make big money". [tip of the hat to HK]

    "Death to false 'support the scene' prog!"

    please add 'imo' wherever you like, to avoid offending those easily offended.

  13. #38
    Jazzbo manqué Mister Triscuits's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Utopia
    Posts
    4,145
    Quote Originally Posted by JKL2000 View Post
    Man, The Rite of Spring is a popular one.
    I like this take:

    Celebrating one year of the legendary RATS' ALLEY on CD and LP
    "His best album yet. Mix of Prog, electronica, jazz and experimental." - Amazon review
    https://michaelpdawson.bandcamp.com
    http://www.waysidemusic.com/Music-Pr...MCD-spc-6.aspx

  14. #39
    Member Zeuhlmate's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Copenhagen, Denmark
    Posts
    6,067
    "Sabre Dance" out of "Gayaneh" by Aram Khatchaturian, an Armenian-Russian composer.


  15. #40
    Member Zeuhlmate's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Copenhagen, Denmark
    Posts
    6,067
    Rite of Spring again -


  16. #41
    Member Zeuhlmate's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Copenhagen, Denmark
    Posts
    6,067
    Some obvious

    The Nice: Bach's Brandenburger no. 5, Sibelius Karelia suite, "America" (Leonard Bernstein, Stephen Sondheim.
    ELP - Pictures at an Exhibition (Mussorgsky, more or less)

    Egg: "Fugue in D Minor" (Johann Sebastian Bach)

  17. #42
    I would like to mention the Spanish band Canarios who did an original re-interpretation of Vivaldi's Le Quattro Stagioni. "Ciclos" is a very complex, enormously creative and instrumentally incredible album, without pseudo-classical elements in their style of playing. On the contrary, the focal points of the composition, the Canarios interpreted in their own way and never just wanted to translate the original into the rock music. "Ciclos" should be listened to in its entirety, but it should be a wonderful journey for every fan of synth-driven prog-rock from the 70s.



  18. #43
    German multi-instrumentalist Haindling (Hans-Jürgen Buchner) did a version of the For seasons, combined with his own music.


  19. #44
    Quote Originally Posted by JKL2000 View Post
    Man, The Rite of Spring is a popular one. I haven't actually read this thread, so this may have been mentioned, but I have a CD called "Stravinsky - The Rite of Spring for Electric Guitar, Electric Bass and Percussion" by some guy named John Ringer.

    https://www.discogs.com/release/1956...And-Percussion
    I have that one too. I quite like it. (Though I think mine says "...for power trio.")
    If a bird can speak, who once was a dinosaur,
    and a dog can dream
    should it be impossible
    that a man might supervise the construction of light?

  20. #45
    In 1976, the Israeli band The Platina hit the studio to record their third album, which would be called The Girl with the Flaxen Hair (after a Debussy Prelude). The recording sessions were completed successfully, but the tapes got lost somehow. Only about 20 minutes of the finished material reached co-bandleader Aaron Kaminsky (according to the CD booklet). The consequence was, of course, that the planned LP never came out. It wasn't until 25 years later that MIO Records released these 20 minutes of studio material on CD titled The Girl with the Flaxen Hair, along with some live recordings. The track two is based on Prelude No. 8 from the first book of the Preludes by Claude Debussy ("The Girl with the Flaxen Hair"), while track three is a re-interpretation of the fourth number from Debussy's six-movement suite for solo piano called Children's Corner ("The Snow Is Dancing"). Both tracks are highly recommended to anyone who likes jazz-rock à la post-Third phase of the Soft Machine.






  21. #46
    Ember
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Delaware County PA
    Posts
    695
    An obvious one:


    And a reaction video to the more recent studio version:
    "I have not yet begun to procrastinate."

  22. #47
    If I'm not mistaken Fireballet's Night On Bald Mountain (Suite) was based on the work of Mussorgsky and Debussy, but I don't know the whole story:


  23. #48
    German band Triumvirat comes to mind. Their keyboardist Hans-Jürgen Fritz was a classically trained musician, a fact that no doubt helped them adapt to taking snippets of Classical music pieces, as well as to create some magnificent Classical-like instrumental-passages. For instance, from the first side of their debut album Mediterranean Tales, the "Overture" and "Underture" of Across the Waters the suite, are adaptations of the overture of Mozart's opera Die Entführung Aus Dem Serail.



  24. #49
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    64
    One thing to consider: while many prog musicians are classically trained players, that doesn’t mean they have classical training as a composer. Playing and composing are two different things. I often wonder about an artist’s training in composition. A musician could be one of the top [classical] players in the world, yet their compositional chops are at an elementary level. Many might not immediately realize this, as their compositions might be filled with mind blowing displays of instrumental (&/or vocal) technique.
    This is a topic for a different thread.

  25. #50
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Maske View Post
    One thing to consider: while many prog musicians are classically trained players, that doesn’t mean they have classical training as a composer. Playing and composing are two different things. I often wonder about an artist’s training in composition. A musician could be one of the top [classical] players in the world, yet their compositional chops are at an elementary level. Many might not immediately realize this, as their compositions might be filled with mind blowing displays of instrumental (&/or vocal) technique.
    This is a topic for a different thread.
    I believe that classical music education helped the founder and keys player of the Serbian band Korni Grupa, Korneliye Kovach - he graduated in composition at the Music Academy - when composing the song "Sonata" in 1969, which is an adaptation of Beethoven's Piano Sonata No.14 in C-sharp Minor ("Moonlight"). Really great vocal performance by their singer Dalibor Brun here!



Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •