Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 51

Thread: Blue Öyster Cult s/t - 50 years today

  1. #26
    I've been a huge fan since the first album came out in 72. Buck is one of the greatest rock guitarists on the planet. Their new-ish album The Symbol Remains is stellar.
    I've seen them countless times since 74. Richie Castellano is a huge plus for the band. He started out as their bass player, then keys, then guitar and keys.
    Buck and Eric are the only original members. Sadly, Allen Lanier, the keyboard player and second guitarist, died of lung cancer some years back. They are still
    terrific live. Albert Bouchard's Imaginos albums are pretty good. I like them much better than the original Imaginos album, which I can't listen to.

  2. #27
    Member dropforge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    3,152
    Quote Originally Posted by rapidfirerob View Post
    Richie Castellano is a huge plus for the band. He started out as their bass player, then keys, then guitar and keys.
    Technically, Richie started out as their soundman! But, yeah, he's a huge plus.

  3. #28
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Kalamazoo Michigan
    Posts
    7,210
    Quote Originally Posted by JKL2000 View Post
    Then you have people like Patti Smith writing lyrics for them too, people who brought something else to the table, a bit more high-brow (I love the Moorcock and stuff too, I'm a big Moorcock fan). Yes, along with the talent in the band, they were well set on lyrics.

    BTW, I'll give one more shout out for Jacob's book Blue Oyster Cult: Every Album, Every Song (On Track). It's great for people just getting into BOC who want a good guide for the journey!
    Agree, Smith's songs definitely brought something different to the band too making them even more unique.

  4. #29
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Kalamazoo Michigan
    Posts
    7,210
    Quote Originally Posted by Enidi View Post
    Wow! I had no idea about these. I haven't been keeping up with the times. There was a Rock band that one of the Bouchard brothers formed. I'm going to Google that again. Cant recall their name.. I believe they were from N.Y.... Some of their albums were really good. They recorded a really strange song that I cannot recall it's title. It describes a guy walking into a truck stop and in the lyric I think he hints that the Truckers were reading his thoughts . He mentions the devil in the song. The song is very creepy to me.

    B.O.C. also recorded a soundtrack in the 80s I used to like. It was along the lines of Goblin and some of the tracks were really cool! I thought gold dust of them. My memory is shot and I'll have to Google it again.

    I loved B.O.C.'s first album! I used to play it alongside Lucifer's Friend (self-titled) , Black Sabbath, and Uriah Heep Demons and Wizards. That style of Rock intrigued me for years. A recent band called Lucifer captures that style on their first album. ...Lucifer 1. I love that cd! Lucifer Was ...Underground and Beyond captures that momentum aside from sounding like Tull. The first B.O.C . has a great album cover and interesting songs. Always loved it!
    I never picked up the "Bad Channels" soundtrack, but maybe should look into it.

    I am guessing the Bouchard band you are talking about was the Brain Surgeons? I don't have any of their stuff, but have thought about checking them out. They have also done the Bouchard Brothers band and Albert was in Blue Coupe with members of the original Alice Cooper band.

    I will have to check out Lucifer's Friend as I have not heard anything from them.

    Regarding newer B.O.C. related stuff, if you did not get "The Symbol Remains" from last year you need to pick it up. One of their best albums ever IMO.

  5. #30
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Kalamazoo Michigan
    Posts
    7,210
    Quote Originally Posted by rapidfirerob View Post
    I've been a huge fan since the first album came out in 72. Buck is one of the greatest rock guitarists on the planet. Their new-ish album The Symbol Remains is stellar.
    I've seen them countless times since 74. Richie Castellano is a huge plus for the band. He started out as their bass player, then keys, then guitar and keys.
    Buck and Eric are the only original members. Sadly, Allen Lanier, the keyboard player and second guitarist, died of lung cancer some years back. They are still
    terrific live. Albert Bouchard's Imaginos albums are pretty good. I like them much better than the original Imaginos album, which I can't listen to.
    Agree with everything you said. Richie is their secret weapon these days.

  6. #31
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    The Planet Lovetron
    Posts
    10,657
    Quote Originally Posted by SteveSly View Post
    I will have to check out Lucifer's Friend as I have not heard anything from them.
    Sure you have.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=GX5uGJ4eask

  7. #32
    Member Bake 2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    California
    Posts
    130
    The first two had power and atmosphere like nothing else that came before, Hendrix wasn't nearly as arcane and twisted lyrically and Mahavishnu Orchestra had no lyrics. At the time there was something undeniably heavy and unknowable about Blue Oyster Cult. Got to see them on the Secret Treaties tour and was amazed by that level of intensity. A few years later the bubble burst in a big way after seeing them looking like, (and talking like) a generic aor band on the Merv Griffin show. Probably have seen them seven or eight times in concert after getting over that. They always managed to burn pretty good live. More than most bands they figure out how to make stuff work better during the gig. If the rock and roll hall of fame had it together these guys would have been in a long time ago.

  8. #33
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Kalamazoo Michigan
    Posts
    7,210
    Quote Originally Posted by moecurlythanu View Post
    Now that you mention it, I did check out some of their stuff when John Lawton died last year so I have heard some stuff, but still not super familiar.

  9. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by SteveSly View Post
    I never picked up the "Bad Channels" soundtrack, but maybe should look into it.

    I am guessing the Bouchard band you are talking about was the Brain Surgeons? I don't have any of their stuff, but have thought about checking them out. They have also done the Bouchard Brothers band and Albert was in Blue Coupe with members of the original Alice Cooper band.

    I will have to check out Lucifer's Friend as I have not heard anything from them.

    Regarding newer B.O.C. related stuff, if you did not get "The Symbol Remains" from last year you need to pick it up. One of their best albums ever IMO.
    The Symbol Remains sounds interesting...thank you SteveSly!

  10. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by dropforge View Post
    Technically, Richie started out as their soundman! But, yeah, he's a huge plus.
    That's right. On a recent interview, Richie said they were desperate for a soundman at a gig. Richie was recruited without really knowing what he was doing and did well enough
    to be invited back. Plus, he's such a nice guy. A great addition to the band since day one. His knowledge of tech helps too.
    I played bass with the first album today in tribute to 50 years of this great album and amazing band.

  11. #36
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    in a cosmic jazzy-groove around Brussels
    Posts
    5,378
    Quote Originally Posted by JKL2000 View Post
    I've never listened to the first couple of albums from them (a bad habit!), so I guess today's a good day to listen to the first! It should have aged properly for me to enjoy it by now! I sometimes like to wait half-a-century or so for the keyboards to develop more body.
    it took me two decades to finally listen to those first two albums. I jumped on the bandwagon with Agents (which I found only OK) and owned Treaties & Spectres (which I found both better than Agents). The last two I followed the band with were Cultusaurus and Origin. I also owned OYK and Enchanted as well. I did see them during those years (as part of a double bill, most likely) and was favorably impressed about the stage show, but it didn't make me change my mind about their studio or live recorded output.

    Nothing survived my move across the pond, but I did take the time to discover (the first two) or relisten to the albums during the 90's, but I guess it was too late for me to hop back on the train. I mean I found the first two rather good (but not as much as Treaties), borrowed via my library system. If I had taken the trouble to make a cassette compilation in the early 80's for car use, I didn't bother with a CDr comp some 20 years ago
    I recently repaid attention with their latest and even bought the expanded Enchanted Evening with the DVD filmed concert. It fits quite well what I saw live and TBH, it will be all I need.
    I mean it would be nice that I do make a CDr compilation (as a mark of respect), but I doubt I will have time & energy & patience to make one. In some ways, the expanded Some Enchanted Evening will suffice to quench my thirst, should that itch ever scratch again.

    But yeah, BÖC certainly was part of my teen soundtrack and I thank them for it.
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from drug-addicts to complete nutcases.

  12. #37
    I really loved their live version of "Kick Out The Jams" from Some Enchanted Evening. The way B.O.C. brought back the power of MC5 in that song and but of course you knew it was B.O.C. and that realization was chilling to me...

    The song "Screams" from their first album was a unique Rock song for me. The entire album had a mysterious vibe and perfect for the times we were living in .
    Although...I do recall when bands like B.O.C., Black Sabbath, Uriah Heep, and Deep Purple first appeared in the Rock Music scene across America and teenagers in high school were calling it "Hard Rock".

    B.O.C. were vital to that movement. In the late 60s Blue Cheer and MC5 were pursuing that style of playing. Particularly the volume as I have a cassette tape of Jimi Hendrix saying.."Man...I went to see Blue Cheer and they were too loud..I couldn't handle it" 😀

    B.O.C. were more diverse about their songs. Harmony vocals, the structure of the song, the breaks/stops, improvisation etc wasn't exactly straight ahead Rock. Sometimes they sounded like they could have been a Progressive Rock band. Sometimes they used inverted chord fingerings that were jazzy...but it was in a Rock song and maybe a lot of people don't realize that some of their arrangements were attributed to the musicians in the band playing Progressive instead of playing Progressive Rock. Idk? Maybe most people do realize? In the early 70s Buck Dharma seemed to really know his way around on the fretboard and he was always improving on the guitar each time I'd see him. Definitely not an average Rock band

  13. #38
    Outstanding release !

    And nice to hear some love for Imaginos. That was the first BOC album I ever bought and that led me to the journey of their back catalog.

  14. #39
    Member since March 2004 mozo-pg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    17,539
    Quote Originally Posted by Trane View Post
    Nothing survived my move across the pond, but I did take the time to discover (the first two) or relisten to the albums during the 90's, but I guess it was too late for me to hop back on the train. I mean I found the first two rather good (but not as much as Treaties), borrowed via my library system. If I had taken the trouble to make a cassette compilation in the early 80's for car use, I didn't bother with a CDr comp some 20 years ago
    I recently repaid attention with their latest and even bought the expanded Enchanted Evening with the DVD filmed concert. It fits quite well what I saw live and TBH, it will be all I need.
    .
    And now for something completely different that I often wondered. What led you from Toronto to Brussels (school, work, family)?
    What can this strange device be? When I touch it, it brings forth a sound.

  15. #40
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    in a cosmic jazzy-groove around Brussels
    Posts
    5,378
    Quote Originally Posted by mozo-pg View Post
    And now for something completely different that I often wondered. What led you from Toronto to Brussels (school, work, family)?
    >> in a PM.
    Not sure it will interest many here.
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from drug-addicts to complete nutcases.

  16. #41
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Kalamazoo Michigan
    Posts
    7,210
    Quote Originally Posted by Enidi View Post
    I Maybe most people do realize? In the early 70s Buck Dharma seemed to really know his way around on the fretboard and he was always improving on the guitar each time I'd see him. Definitely not an average Rock band
    And the cool thing is, Buck has just gotten better and better as he has grown older. Seeing them live today with the twin guitar attack of Buck and Richie together is something to behold. Buck has become a master of the instrument in his golden years.

  17. #42
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    South Jersey
    Posts
    145
    The Stalk Forrest Group's St Cecilia album is worth picking for early BOC fans. Sort of a more psychedelic version of early BOC.

    And for those that enjoy that, the Soft White Underbelly recording sessions are on youtube. Buck/Allen/Albert, with original singer Les Braunstein, and bassist Andy Winters.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=84l17w6AlYk

    edit - I may have seen that link posted on this board previously, apologies if I'm resharing.

  18. #43
    Member dropforge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    3,152
    I like the story about Springsteen being in the building at the same time BÖC was tracking "7 Screaming Diz-Busters" and remarking [about Buck's playing]: "I didn't know anyone could play that fast."

  19. #44
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    in a cosmic jazzy-groove around Brussels
    Posts
    5,378
    Quote Originally Posted by Aggie87 View Post
    The Stalk Forrest Group's St Cecilia album is worth picking for early BOC fans. Sort of a more psychedelic version of early BOC.

    And for those that enjoy that, the Soft White Underbelly recording sessions are on youtube. Buck/Allen/Albert, with original singer Les Braunstein, and bassist Andy Winters.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=84l17w6AlYk

    edit - I may have seen that link posted on this board previously, apologies if I'm resharing.
    Weeeeellll, ben meaning to check that out for a while, so I just did... both appeared on the same link (the other as first suiggestion)
    interesting listen, thx for posting

    Yes, you can hear BÖC in those two, though more clearly on SFG than in SWU. In some ways, I love these lengthy instrumental passages, so much that it could dethrone Treaties as my fave BÖC album. They gad a Grateful Dead side back then , IMHO.
    Last edited by Trane; 01-19-2022 at 01:30 PM.
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from drug-addicts to complete nutcases.

  20. #45
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    The Planet Lovetron
    Posts
    10,657
    Quote Originally Posted by dropforge View Post
    I like the story about Springsteen being in the building at the same time BÖC was tracking "7 Screaming Diz-Busters" and remarking [about Buck's playing]: "I didn't know anyone could play that fast."
    Ever since the 70s, I've wondered what a screaming diz-buster is. Anybody know?

  21. #46
    Member dropforge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    3,152
    Quote Originally Posted by moecurlythanu View Post
    Ever since the 70s, I've wondered what a screaming diz-buster is. Anybody know?
    According to Al Bouchard, the "diz" is the cleft of the penis, and a "diz-buster" is anything (presumably a woman, per the sex in-jokes that constitute a portion of the lyrics) that makes a guy ejaculate.

    The "7" are the five members of the band, plus producer Sandy Pearlman and lyricist Richard Meltzer.

  22. #47
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    The Planet Lovetron
    Posts
    10,657
    ^ Thanks. Never would have guessed that on my own.

  23. #48
    Member dropforge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    3,152
    Quote Originally Posted by moecurlythanu View Post
    ^ Thanks. Never would have guessed that on my own.
    Nobody would have. Methinks Dick Meltzer supplied the lewd bits. FWIW, he later became the vocalist for Smegma.

  24. #49
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Kalamazoo Michigan
    Posts
    7,210
    Quote Originally Posted by Aggie87 View Post
    The Stalk Forrest Group's St Cecilia album is worth picking for early BOC fans. Sort of a more psychedelic version of early BOC.

    And for those that enjoy that, the Soft White Underbelly recording sessions are on youtube. Buck/Allen/Albert, with original singer Les Braunstein, and bassist Andy Winters.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=84l17w6AlYk

    edit - I may have seen that link posted on this board previously, apologies if I'm resharing.
    Another fan of the Stalk Forrest Group album. Great stuff!

  25. #50
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Kalamazoo Michigan
    Posts
    7,210
    Quote Originally Posted by dropforge View Post
    According to Al Bouchard, the "diz" is the cleft of the penis, and a "diz-buster" is anything (presumably a woman, per the sex in-jokes that constitute a portion of the lyrics) that makes a guy ejaculate.

    The "7" are the five members of the band, plus producer Sandy Pearlman and lyricist Richard Meltzer.
    I have seen that interview somewhere, but I think Albert was joking around. The “Diz-Busters” song was part of the overall Imaginos saga and indeed is included in Albert’s 2nd Imaginos album in between the songs “Independence Day” and “Od’d On Life Itself”. If I remember correctly Matin Popoff talks about the song in his Imaginos book, but I don’t remember specifics. The lyrics appear to fit Imaginos and don’t really seem to fit the “penis / ejaculation” description:

    They held their heads with laughs of pain
    They learned from men who'd just refrain
    From glancing at a mirror's face
    Seven screaming diz-busters who lurked by a rose
    Had iron for a bloodstream and ice behind their eyes

    On each and all those holy nights
    Where dusters dust becomes the sale and lucifer, the light

    They're long so long this time of year
    When stars be crossed by twirling fear
    You don't suppose I'd prove surprised
    Seven screaming diz-busters should go the route and die
    Without the warmth they learn to crave
    With hardened smiles and evil signs

    On each and all those holy nights
    Where dusters dust becomes the sale and lucifer, the light

    Bury me near the secret cove so they'll not know the way
    Bury me there, behind the rose so they'll not rile my grave
    I'll not reveal whose name still loose (?)
    Well their laugh of pain...And their harder smiles...
    And their rigid arms...And their evil signs...
    Longer days and the longer nights
    And their longer, and longer still

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •