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Thread: Is psychedelic rock the father of progressive rock?

  1. #1

    Is psychedelic rock the father of progressive rock?

    I personally don't think so but i'm sure that psychedelic rock led to progressive rock if not from structure/direct influence than from evolution point of view. From simple fuzzed out songs into more sophisticated effects driven and production long suites.

    In any case, i really love the genre....
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    Both Psychedelic rock and Progressive rock as distinct genres were born within the zeitgeist of Psychedelia that ruled as a meta-genre in 1960s.

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    I do think that one led to another in a way, see even simple examples like Pink Floyd and how they emerge....

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    Quote Originally Posted by MIO Records View Post
    I do think that one led to another in a way, see even simple examples like Pink Floyd and how they emerge....
    ....and Family as also a great English band from the same Underground music scene and who had released the first Progressive rock album ever, "Music in a Doll's House", in July 1968.

    Pink Floyd, who released their debut in August 1967, were one of the first Psychedelic rock bands, while Family, now often overlooked among historians, were the first Progressive rock band ever.
    Thus, Psychedelic rock and Progressive rock originated de facto at the same time, at the same place. But, Psychedelia was the zeitgeist back then and not only influenced the Underground music scene, but also alternative fashion, visual arts, film ...

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Monet View Post
    ....and Family as also a great English band from the same Underground music scene and who had released the first Progressive rock album ever, "Music in a Doll's House", in July 1968.

    Pink Floyd, who released their debut in August 1967, were one of the first Psychedelic rock bands, while Family, now often overlooked among historians, were the first Progressive rock band ever.
    Thus, Psychedelic rock and Progressive rock originated de facto at the same time, at the same place. But, Psychedelia was the zeitgeist back then and not only influenced the Underground music scene, but also alternative fashion, visual arts, film ...
    i find Family first album more psychedelic than progressive but the nice were also doing prog around the same time.

  7. #7
    I think it was a coming together of lots of things, classical influence coming into rock music with things like She's Leaving Home, and Elanor Rigby and Whiter Shade of Pale and Days Of Future Past. The dynamics and instrumentation came more from the jazz fusion of the time, what Miles and his collaborators were doing from the mid 60's on affected Hendrix which affected The Nice (again, along with classical rips) . The popularity of musicals at the time probably helped with making the longer form more palatable to the public (was Jesus Christ Superstar and Joseph proto prog?). And just a kind of high-mindedness that led to things like Concerto For Group and Orchestra and Pink Floyd soundtracking the moon landings in a plummy BBC presentation. Also some stuff that would have been labelled progressive rock had that been a thing at the time like Iron Butterfly and Soft Machine. There was progressive rock for a good 3 or 4 years before anyone called it that.

    So no, not just psychedelic rock, though that was one component of several.

    If it was any one piece of music that was the first full formed prog track I would say A Day In The Life (which is as much a prog track as, say, anything off Nursery Cryme, with the different sections and whatnot)

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    Quote Originally Posted by MIO Records View Post
    i find Family first album more psychedelic than progressive but the nice were also doing prog around the same time.
    Indeed, The Nice had released their debut album even earlier, in March 1968. That album featuring quite 'progressive' "Rondo" track. However, unlike The Nice's debut, "Music in a Doll's House" is the first full-blown Progressive rock album, at least to these ears.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Monet View Post
    Indeed, The Nice had released their debut album even earlier, in March 1968. That album featuring quite 'progressive' "Rondo" track. However, unlike The Nice's debut, "Music in a Doll's House" is the first full-blown Progressive rock album, at least to these ears.
    So we can even go back to Jacques Lussier 4th album (maybe 5th) that is bach with jazz and even hints of prog ala nice :-)

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    Quote Originally Posted by revporl View Post
    If it was any one piece of music that was the first full formed prog track I would say A Day In The Life (which is as much a prog track as, say, anything off Nursery Cryme, with the different sections and whatnot)
    "A Day in the Life", as well as "Sgt. Pepper..." as a whole concept thing, sounds to me exactly what will be called ‘Art Rock’ in the seventies. In my humble opinion, this is the first song of the Progressive rock genre, released as A-side of the Family's debut single, in October 1967:


    "Scene Through The Eye of a Lens"


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    Some of it, but some progressive music required a focused mind.

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    I think Progressive Rock has it's roots from jazz.
    I grew up listening to early rock n roll, but also enjoyed listening to the Dave Brubeck Quartet.
    The similarities are odd time signatures, poly rhythmic parts, extended pieces of music, improvisation, etc.

    I remember once suggesting to my wife of a way to listen to Yes when they would get into a rather complicated section of their music, and it's what helped me also from what I learned when first listening to jazz.
    And that was for me, to listen to one part, one instrument and focus on that, and then as you get in the groove you can kind of use that as a base and start to let your mind listen to what everyone is playing as a whole piece of music...and it worked for her. She now loves even the complicated sections that Yes plays, and it helps with other progressive rock bands we listen to..like King Crimson.
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  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Top Cat View Post
    I think Progressive Rock has it's roots from jazz.
    I grew up listening to early rock n roll, but also enjoyed listening to the Dave Brubeck Quartet.
    The similarities are odd time signatures, poly rhythmic parts, extended pieces of music, improvisation, etc.

    I remember once suggesting to my wife of a way to listen to Yes when they would get into a rather complicated section of their music, and it's what helped me also from what I learned when first listening to jazz.
    And that was for me, to listen to one part, one instrument and focus on that, and then as you get in the groove you can kind of use that as a base and start to let your mind listen to what everyone is playing as a whole piece of music...and it worked for her. She now loves even the complicated sections that Yes plays, and it helps with other progressive rock bands we listen to..like King Crimson.
    Oh, i totally agree that Brubeck did a flavor of what we call progressive rock in his 1959 album.

  14. #14
    To me, this is really the first overtly prog album:

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    Maybe it's the cool uncle?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick L. View Post
    Maybe it's the cool uncle?
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  17. #17
    Yes, absolutely. Pyschedelic begat prog.

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    In January of 1969, the band Man released an album that in a way crossed the aforementioned borders between Psychedelic, Hard Rock and Blues into the realm of early Progressive Rock. Hey, they even had their single from the LP, "Erotica", banned in England due to the orgasm sounds. Now that's Progressive!

    Man_Revelation.jpg
    Last edited by SunRunner2; 09-02-2021 at 10:57 AM.

  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by SunRunner2 View Post
    In January of 1969, the band Man released an album that in a way crossed the aforementioned borders between Psychedelic, Hard Rock and Blues into the realm of early Progressive Rock. Hey, they even had their single from the LP, "Erotica", banned in England due to the orgasm sounds. Now that's Progressive!

    Man_Revelation.jpg
    A good one i forgot! :-) just added to the psychedelic playlist which is 350 hours already ;-)

  20. #20
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
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    Psych was an antecedent of Progressive Rock, but wasn't the only precursor. There are other scenes in the mix as well.
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    Broadly speaking, yes.

    More specifically speaking, some currents in psych gave rise to prog. Not all of them did. Garage rock didn't, country-rock didn't, roots-rock didn't, blues-rock and blues jamming were at best tangential, and so were the Grateful Dead and their followers. And minimalist art-rock (i.e., The Velvet Underground et al) was the opposite.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dana5140 View Post
    To me, this is really the first overtly prog album:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zcBB3IMSFtg
    I respect your opinion but regarding American 'progressive' artists of the 60s, I'm afraid that three very important U.S. 'progressive' albums had been released before Touch s/t from 1969. That's Spirit's s/t debut from January 1968 and "The Family That Plays Together" released in December of the same year, and the Steve Miller Band's "Children of the Future" released in June 1968 (not to mention more experimental and avantgarde The Mothers' stuff that was released even earlier) :



    Spirit "Elijah" 1968







    Spirit "It Shall Be" 1968







    Steve Miller Band "In My First Mind" 1968


  23. #23
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    This is sort of analogous to the classic chicken and eggs debate. I think full blown progressive rock came after psyhedelic but I don't think it was influenced by psychedelic so much as it evolved out of the same zeigeist that allowed psych to flourish. Artists and bands in general were starting to explore new ideas and this led to psychedelic first and then to prog. It seems that a lot of psych artists had prog elements and vice versa and so the lines were often blurry.
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  24. #24
    I enjoy all 3 albums to varying degrees, but Iím not hearing the progressive element as generally understood here, or anywhere else, IMHO. Referring to ďMonetísĒ post.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Baribrotzer View Post
    Broadly speaking, yes.

    More specifically speaking, some currents in psych gave rise to prog. Not all of them did. Garage rock didn't, country-rock didn't, roots-rock didn't, blues-rock and blues jamming were at best tangential, and so were the Grateful Dead and their followers. And minimalist art-rock (i.e., The Velvet Underground et al) was the opposite.
    Absolutely. Early Grateful Dead were psych but never really evolved into prog (not counting their Terrapin Station album from several years later which was probably an anomaly in their catalog anyway). The early experimentation of some psych like the Grateful Dead and Pink Floyd was adopted by prog but like you say not all psych stuff led directly to prog(ie garage rock, folk rock etc). It was the classical or even jazz elements in some of the psych that were adopted by the early prog bands(Family, The Nice, King Cdrimson, Moodies, PH etc).
    When you list all the qualities that you despise and you realize you're describing yourself.

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