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Thread: Krautrock in the 70's outside Germany?!

  1. #26
    MOOLAH from United States.
    Australian CYBOTRON and Steven Maxwell von Braund
    Last edited by spacefreak; 07-29-2021 at 09:32 AM.
    Macht das ohr auf!

    COSMIC EYE RECORDS

  2. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by spacefreak View Post
    MOOLAH from United States.
    Australian CYBOTRON and Steven Maxwell von Braund
    Moolah is not on spotify :-( good one! thought of it as well.
    Cybotron already in. Thanks.

    Steven Maxwell von Braund, i didn't know this one! added!

    link to the playlist: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/3s...945ab8268d4eaf
    325hours!

  3. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by spacefreak View Post
    MOOLAH from United States.
    The Moolah album is hilarious; the liner notes are all about peaceful meditation and other new-age joys. It’s one of the most nightmarish electronic albums I’ve ever heard; it makes Heldon sound like Windham Hill stuff!
    Confirmed Bachelors: the dramedy hit of 1883...

  4. #29
    Member Monet's Avatar
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    Dos Mukasan, from the ex-Soviet Kazakh Republic, earned honorable mention. Their "Betpak Dala" track (1976) is very reminiscent of the early 70's West German psychedelia. A successful "krautrock" track, certainly.






    There are actually some absolute classic psychedelic tracks from the former Soviet block, that enriched with a quite quirky ideas, but they are scattered on various albums and compilations. Anyway, these tracks are also extremely beautiful non-German "krautrock" gems, in my humble opinion:



    Suuk "Narkomaan" 1976 Soviet Estonia








    Yuri Morozov "Neizyasnimoe" 1978 Russian Soviet Republic



  5. #30
    Member Monet's Avatar
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    Originally released in 1971 (reissued on Black Rills Records in 1994), this album by Swiss band Deaf is still a refreshing record that offers the first-class 'krautrock' from the early 70's Europe. Indeed, "Alfa" is a really fun record, as Deaf's music is completely crazy while bursting out of various themes with loud guitars, dramatic organs, flute and insane vocals. Swiss band had created some loony tunes placed into exotic & dreamily 'psychedelic' worlds of the early seventies, that should be interesting for krautrock fans.





  6. #31
    Member Zeuhlmate's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MIO Records View Post
    Fantastic! I didn't hear paternoster for 20 years i think!

    This made me remember Burning Red Ivanhoe!
    Junipher Greene is not on spotify but clupepers orchad is there, at least the first album fit ;-)
    Ache as well, remind me a bit of Guru Guru.
    Day of phoenix?!
    Neither Burning Red Ivanhoe, Ache and definetely not Day of Phoenix strikes me as Kraut.
    Burning and Ache has kraut'ish moments, but not many.
    Day of Phoenix's first album is great, but is more in a perhaps in a Tassavallan vein, where there second is very inspired by american westcoast, and to me not very interesting.

  7. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by Zeuhlmate View Post
    Neither Burning Red Ivanhoe, Ache and definetely not Day of Phoenix strikes me as Kraut.
    Burning and Ache has kraut'ish moments, but not many.
    I'd have to agree. The heavy duty of Danish "alternative" rock in 1969-75 was the debt from two main sources; contemporary U.S. rock both over- and underground (folk-, blues- and country-rock artifacts, U.S. West-Coast "deep" psychedelia, brass-pop) and finally vintage U.K. progressive such as found on the Dawn/Neon/Spiral Vertigo etc.

    Alrune Rod's first two records - which arguably count as some of the freakiest and most psychedelic rock albums I ever heard; the true spice at least an ounce of pure hashish plus probably eleven bayers - were certainly informed by Barrett and the vintage Floyd, but also by Vanilla Fudge, Iron Butterfly and the likes. I really don't hear that formalist approach to conceptual experimentation which was so prevalent to the defining kraut-bands.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  8. #33
    Member Zeuhlmate's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post

    Alrune Rod's first two records - which arguably count as some of the freakiest and most psychedelic rock albums I ever heard; the true spice at least an ounce of pure hashish plus probably eleven bayers - were certainly informed by Barrett and the vintage Floyd, but also by Vanilla Fudge, Iron Butterfly and the likes. I really don't hear that formalist approach to conceptual experimentation which was so prevalent to the defining kraut-bands.
    In my ears the sound is very kraut'ish, but perhaps its more 'by accident' than being part of a movement /genre / way of thinking..
    They didn't have any aspirations of being art in any way, they were just a band by rather amateurish self taught young musicians.

    Interview with one of the guitarists - 50 years after: https://side33.dk/en-alrune-taler-ud-50-aar-efter/

  9. #34
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    Paternoster came from Vienna and thus belong to the small group of Austrian psychedelic and progressive bands that were active in the early 1970s. The band only existed for two years, but at least they were able to release a self-titled album in 1972. In 1991, the album was re-released for the first time on CD by Ohrwaschl Records, with an LP serving as a master due to the lack of the original tapes. In 2016, Now-Again Records reissued the album as an online release on Bandcamp as well as a CD and vinyl LP.
    Paternoster offer a varied and heavy krautrock on their only album. Actually, it's a very decent music. Sacred-classical organ runs and echoing e-guitar solos, interrupted from time to time by brisk sections which sometimes get an almost jazzy character, beautifully dusty and full of psychedelic sound waves. The whole thing is played quite skillfully, maybe it seems a bit bumpy at times, but pretty iconic anyway. Especially if you are a fan of the early 70's organ-driven krautrock, you should appreciate these Austrians' music.








  10. #35
    The Paternoster record was infamously taped at too high a pacing of the reel, rendering executions sounding like a molten corpse when later played down to normal speed. I don't think the initially intended recordings were ever heard by any folks of particular note; most likely the cheap masters were ruined in the first place. I'm sure the original ideas for arrangements and tones were honest enough, but the outcome was sappy, sloppy'n'floppydoppy.

    Älgarnas Trädgård, Fille Qui Mousse and perhaps the fantastic Paradise Now by Groep 1850 were the essential non-German "proto-krauts", I believe.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  11. #36
    Member Monet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    Älgarnas Trädgård, Fille Qui Mousse and perhaps the fantastic Paradise Now by Groep 1850 were the essential non-German "proto-krauts", I believe.
    Well, if we are going to discuss the essential non-German proto-kraut thing from continental Europe, then it's without a doubt the year 1967 and Le Stelle di Mario Schifano (transl. "The Stars of Mario Schifano"). Actually, Mario Schifano was probably something like the Italian equivalent of Andy Warhol. Like the latter, he patronized a rock band - Le Stelle di Mario Schifano - whose only album - "Dedicato a ..." - he co-produced. The band was formed in Rome in 1967, but was disbanded a year later.
    The only LP of the group is in the original, with gatefold cover, eight-page booklet and on red vinyl, probably one of the rarest and most sought-after record rarities from Italy. This is explained on the one hand by the fact that until 1992, when Mellow Records re-released the album for the first time, there was no reissue of the album, neither on LP nor on CD, on the other hand from the exceptional content of the record. The first, side-long track is one of the most adventurous psychedelic - "krautrock" if you like - freakouts that has ever been pressed onto a sound carrier.
    "Le ultime parole di Brandimarte, dall'Orlando Furioso, ospite Peter Hartman e fine (da ascoltare con TV accesa senza volume)" is an approximately 18-minute surreal-experimental sound orgy of wobbling organ runs, confused piano clinking, shouting, distorted electric guitar crunch - and drum mess, throbbing bass accompaniment and sounds and noises from the tape. For 1967 the whole thing is probably quite unique (which may also be due to the fact that no record label would normally have released something like this in 1967 - only the financial support from Mario Schifano made an exception here) and reminds, if at all , of anything, then of the studio experiments of the Pink Floyd members on the second LP of "Ummagumma", which only appeared two years later. With this track, Le Stelle di Mario Schifano even set an example for Anglo-American comparative bands and refute the thesis that only British and American models were copied in continental Europe in the 1960s. The rest of the album is a bit more conventional and offers five shorter, psychedelic rock songs, which, however, have their own character due to the occasional use of the flute and the Italian singing. "Dedicato a ..." is definitely a record that you wouldn't expect from Italy in the 1960s. If you really appreciate crazy, psychedelic experiments, you should definitely get this album, which is now also available on CD!



    Le Stelle di Mario Schifano "Le ultime parole di Brandimante ..." (from "Dedicato a..." 1967)


  12. #37
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    Pyranha were a sextet from the city of Yverdon-les-Bains in the canton of Vaud in Switzerland, near the Swiss-French borders. They had released a self-titled album in 1972. Pyranha the album is pretty decent example of long floating krautrock-jam with an intoxicating rhythm section that providing an intense psychedelic grooves with a saxophone over often uncanny sound of organ. This is a jazzy mixture of cosmic soundscapes with trippy guitar-work but also having an eerie atmosphere due to haunting chants; having mostly a phantasmic e-piano, hallucinatory vibraphone & bass in the background, the band gave space for some insane poetry in French language. Pyranha had delivered a splendid, rather minimalistic, spacey and spooky music that should certainly be tempting for fans of the more experimental side of the early 70's krautrock.




  13. #38
    I think someone needs to remind Svetonet to reel it in.
    Confirmed Bachelors: the dramedy hit of 1883...

  14. #39
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    Originally released in 1971, "Cottonwoodhill" is the debut album of Swiss band Brainticket and represents an ultimate masterpiece of non-German krautrock from the high phase of that genre. A truly magnificent and experimental psychedelia can be heard here, which is most reminiscent of the Munich Amon Düül II. This music is dominated and held together primarily by the Hammond organ, which dominates all tracks. There is also some flute playing, various sound and tape snippets, electronic cosmic sounds and crazy, drug-laden singing of Mrs. Muir. The album starts in the usual dynamic way, but then everything turns into a crisp, repetitive rhythm, with a lot of female moans, fragments of speech, noise and effects. The cover illustrates the music to the point: a woman screaming in despair with a bulging brain, engulfed in the vortex.
    "Cottonwoodenhill" still sound fresh while remains a classic of the genre in its suggestive effect and its intoxication and hence can be warmly recommended to all krautrock freaks.








  15. #40
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    ^ Never heard of it.

  16. #41
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    Cheval Fou probably came from Paris and were the trio that was active on the French Underground scene 1970-75, but never released an album back then. In 1994, a small CD edition was released on the Legend Music label with archive material from the band, which was (for the most part) recorded at concerts or in the rehearsal room during the above-mentioned period. In 2011, Cheval Fou the album was reissued by Italian psychedelic & experimental music label Psych Up Melodies.
    The three Frenchmen mostly use electric guitars and drums here, with one of them apparently also often reaching into the strings of a bass. There is very seldom an exalted-squeaking sax that is heavily alienated from the effects and all sorts of bizarre voices. The result is a psychedelic-spacey-herbaceous rock full of free-form progressive guitar excursions, which takes place somewhere near the French colleagues of Ame Son or Amphyrite, sometimes also sounds like the early Gong, or early Pink Floyd, but above all freaky Krautrock à la Guru Guru, Ash Ra Tempel or Amon Düül II.
    The sound of the whole thing is mostly well audible; even a child and a man utter all sorts of text, accompanied by hypnotic lulling, constant percussion patterns, subtle guitar howling and all kinds of minimalist, repetitious organ interludes. "Cheval Fou" is by all means cult and anyone who appreciates psychedelic-herbaceous-cosmic space excursions with the charm of the early 70's European Underground music, will certainly get their money's worth here.






  17. #42
    Thanks! La Stelle Di Mario indeed is a good one!

    All these east europe albums i know but they are not on spotify.

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