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Thread: Pink Floyd Animals Remix

  1. #126
    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    The thing about live albums is I often get the impression there's an attitude in some quarters that they're "just a rip off' and "nostalgia orientated" or whatever. Roger Glover said when Deep Purple's Japanese label asked to do a live album when they went over there in August '72, the band was resistant because live albums had a "budget" feel to them.
    No question that the appeal/perception of live albums has changed a lot over the years. Recall reading that Genesis Live (1973) was released over the objections of the band as a stop gap for the lack of new material. Regardless, plenty of bands had the foresight to do some professional recordings. No doubt the members of PF now regret their lack of foresight. Of my top 10 bands, only ELO has a similarly dodgy live catalog.

  2. #127
    Quote Originally Posted by ca1ore View Post
    No question that the appeal/perception of live albums has changed a lot over the years.
    The perception changed due to the fact live music, at least so far as "rock music" was concerned, moved away from "recreating the studio version" to giving the concertgoer "something new". There's an interview thing Pete Townshend did in 66 or 67 (he refers to Jimi Hendrix as a "new artist") where he's talking about the music industry was changing, from trying to "play the song onstage the way it is on the record" to "making records that try to capture the excitement and energy of live performance" (not his words, but that's essentialy what he's talking about.

    And obviously when bands like The Grateful Dead, Deep Purple, King Crimson, etc started doing what they did, i.e. jamming/improvisation, playing songs that hadn't been released yet, etc it becomes obvious that there was definitely stuff happening onstage that went waaaaay beyond what was on the studio records.

    But as I said, the perception in a lot of quarters, maybe even to this day, was that "live albums" were just a cash grab, something to squeeze more money out of the fans, and possibly even a sign that the band is "running out of ideas". At best, it was something you did when you needed "a little breathing room" before you had to deliver another LP's worth of new music. I think the members of Rush even admitted the latter. They actually intended to do a live album after Permanent Waves, but as the tour for that album developed, they realized they were coming up with enough material that they realized they didn't need the break just yet.

    Recall reading that Genesis Live (1973) was released over the objections of the band as a stop gap for the lack of new material.
    I don't remember hearing of them being upset about the release of Genesis Live, but I know it came out because they weren't sure if they'd be able to deliver the next studio album by the deadline Tony Stratton Smith had given them.
    Regardless, plenty of bands had the foresight to do some professional recordings.
    Only when they have a specific project in mind, i.e. live album, radio/TV broadcast, etc. It might be different now, but back then, there was no way you could afford to hire a multi-track mobile studio, just for the purposes of having a live document of the given tour. Maybe whatever project would fall through for whatever reason, e.g. Sabbath actually did a couple different sets of live recordings in the early 70's which got set aside (one of which ended up being released, eventually, on Live At Last, several years later).
    No doubt the members of PF now regret their lack of foresight.
    They've specifically regretted not filming any of the circa 73-77 shows.
    Of my top 10 bands, only ELO has a similarly dodgy live catalog.
    Not sure what kind of a live band they were. They famously played along to backing tapes on some tours, and I know I saw one video on YouTube, I think from the time Mike Edwards was still in the band, where the cellists are horrendously out of tune (presumably because they were doing all this Chuck Berry/Jimi Hendrix style stage stuff, which doesn't work too good when you're playing a fretless instrument). I also remember Jeff Lynne saying he hated playing live, noting that Richard Tandy always had to "cover" for the cellists when they were dancing around.

  3. #128
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve F. View Post
    Everything I ever heard about Roger leads me to agree with what you say, except:

    Simon has a friend who was part of Roger's crew on one of his mega-tours. It was a gigantic crew - like 60-80 people NOT including the musicians. When the hiring was done, Roger personally came and spoke to every crew member and shook their hand and within a couple of weeks had learned everyone's name. He also ate all his meals with the crew. Simon's friend said it was the best work situation that he had ever been involved with as a crew member and Roger really made EVERYONE feel like they were part of an appreciated team.

    That surprised me a lot, but I was happy to hear it.
    Thanks for sharing that. It's good to be reminded that people can have good qualities, even when they're Roger Waters.

  4. #129
    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post


    Only when they have a specific project in mind, i.e. live album, radio/TV broadcast, etc. It might be different now, but back then, there was no way you could afford to hire a multi-track mobile studio, just for the purposes of having a live document of the given tour. Maybe whatever project would fall through for whatever reason, e.g. Sabbath actually did a couple different sets of live recordings in the early 70's which got set aside (one of which ended up being released, eventually, on Live At Last, several years later).
    Zappa did a fair amount of recording

  5. #130
    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    But as I said, the perception in a lot of quarters, maybe even to this day, was that "live albums" were just a cash grab, something to squeeze more money out of the fans, and possibly even a sign that the band is "running out of ideas". At best, it was something you did when you needed "a little breathing room" before you had to deliver another LP's worth of new music. I think the members of Rush even admitted the latter. They actually intended to do a live album after Permanent Waves, but as the tour for that album developed, they realized they were coming up with enough material that they realized they didn't need the break just yet.
    I think Rush had something like a 4 studio-albums, 1 live-album thing going on.

    Santiano (not prog, but it features Pete Sage, formerly from Wally) seems to do a live-album after each studio-album, which I think is a bit overdoing it.

  6. #131
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    Yes must have set a world record for number of live albums released.

  7. #132
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rarebird View Post
    I think Rush had something like a 4 studio-albums, 1 live-album thing going on.
    Rush had their Archives set, which was the first three albums. But there was no 4th live disk (but that would have been cool.)
    I'm holding out for the Wilson-mixed 5.1 super-duper walletbuster special anniversary extra adjectives edition.

  8. #133
    Quote Originally Posted by Paulrus View Post
    Rush had their Archives set, which was the first three albums. But there was no 4th live disk (but that would have been cool.)
    I've got that as well, three albums in a double-album gatefold? Cheapskates!

  9. #134
    Jazzbo manqué Mister Triscuits's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lovecraft View Post
    Yes must have set a world record for number of live albums released.
    King Crimson begs to differ. (Let alone the Grateful Dead.)

  10. #135
    Quote Originally Posted by happytheman View Post
    Zappa did a fair amount of recording
    But there again, Frank had purposes for recording stuff. A lot of his albums, even the supposed "studio" albums, are pieced together with bits recorded in the studio and bits from live, with studio overdubs, etc.

    Frank eventually bought he his own 24 track mobile studio in the early 80's, but he said up until then, when the band would play LA, NYC, or London, he'd rent a remote truck and record those shows. He said sometimes the performances weren't that great, for one reason or another, while fantastic performances in Leeds or Boise or Cleveland or wherever, would be captured only on 2 or 8 track recordings. (Kinda makes me think of Fripp's comment that if King Crimson were playing in NYC, LA, Paris, someplace "exciting" like that, their manages would show up, but as soon as the tour decamped to Toledo, or Stoke-On-Trent or Nancy, suddenly the managers "have to get back to London to deal with business").

    I think Rush had something like a 4 studio-albums, 1 live-album thing going on.
    Not deliberately. They had booked a remote truck to record a couple shows on the UK leg of the Permanent Waves tour, with the intention of putting out a live album, because they initially felt they needed another break from "writing the next album". But what happened was, as the tour got underway, Geddy and Alex were coming up with stuff in soundchecks, and I guess Neil had some ideas of what he wanted to do for lyrics, so after the tour, instead of mixing down the Glasgow and...was it London?, recordings, they pressed forward with teh record we now know and love as Moving Pictures. That's why Exit...Stage Left has stuff recorded on both tours, because they had the recordings, and I guess they liked the Glasgow and London recordings.

    Maybe they deliberately did A Show Of Hands that way, the four studio albums followed by a live album,
    Yes must have set a world record for number of live albums released.
    One of the reasons I stopped using Pandora was they apparently had every Yes live album and compilation. So say something like Roundabout would pop, studio version, from Fragile. So you'd click "Don't play this song". So then like five songs it later, it plays the Yessongs version. So you click on "Don't play this song", then like another five songs later, it plays the Yes To Ascension version, and again, you click on "Don't Plays this song again", and then it goes to the version sourced from the Classic Yes CD, or some other compilation or a boxset or whatever. They should have a button that says "Don't play ANY verison of this song, EVER". And it does that with every song that's on all those live albums and best ofs, whether it be And You And I, Starship Trooper, etc.

  11. #136
    Member Jerjo's Avatar
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    He said sometimes the performances weren't that great, for one reason or another, while fantastic performances in Leeds or Boise or Cleveland or wherever, would be captured only on 2 or 8 track recordings.
    Keith Richards said in his book that the best Stones shows were never recorded. Every time the tapes were rolling something went wrong.

    One of the reasons I stopped using Pandora was they apparently had every Yes live album and compilation. So say something like Roundabout would pop, studio version, from Fragile. So you'd click "Don't play this song". So then like five songs it later, it plays the Yessongs version. So you click on "Don't play this song", then like another five songs later, it plays the Yes To Ascension version, and again, you click on "Don't Plays this song again", and then it goes to the version sourced from the Classic Yes CD, or some other compilation or a boxset or whatever. They should have a button that says "Don't play ANY verison of this song, EVER". And it does that with every song that's on all those live albums and best ofs, whether it be And You And I, Starship Trooper, etc.
    And this is one more reason why I don't do Spotify or Pandora.
    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  12. #137
    Quote Originally Posted by Trane View Post

    I've had a couple fallouts with old mates in both ways. The one that makes the first step in gluing back the "Broken China" pieces is in a position of weakness, despite of who was (W)right (another intended double pun) in the original feud. Generally this "gesture" entitles/enpowers the "askee" over the "asker", and often drives the former to act as an arsehole with unreasonable demands (unwillingness to make up easily and make the other crawl a bit more). In this Floyd case, I believe Gilmour relishes his position and laughs (below the cape) at Waters' multiple/repeated demands, but deep down he knows it won't work out.
    It's a real shame that your experiences have caused you to think this way, and for that I am truly sorry.

    For me, when I try to rekindle relationships years after a fallout, I always know it'll never be able to return to what it once was, and I never consider either of us having more or less power over the other, The best I hope for is really just simple reconciliation, where whatever animosity may have existed can just get shelved, and for good. If that can happen and I can be on amicable, amiable terms with the person, even if we aren't in touch like we were in years past, then I feel good, like I've managed to get rid of one of the "issues" that are hanging over my head and I'd love to eliminate as my life is now well into its third act.
    John Kelman
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    Freelance writer/photographer

  13. #138
    Member chalkpie's Avatar
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    ^ I don't know about Pandora but Spotify is just playing albums like CDs or LPs.

  14. #139
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mister Triscuits View Post
    King Crimson begs to differ. (Let alone the Grateful Dead.)
    OK, let me rephrase that. : )

    Yes must have out the largest number of live albums recorded in the bands long slow decline at ever more stodgy tempos.....

  15. #140
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    Quote Originally Posted by chalkpie View Post
    ^ I don't know about Pandora but Spotify is just playing albums like CDs or LPs.
    Indeed. I never listen to anything that Spotify recommends.
    "A waste of talent and electricity." John Peel on ELP

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