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Thread: Jimi Hendrix - A bluffer's guide to the live albums

  1. #26
    I suppose you'd need to be quite a strong conga player to be audible onstage with Jimi and Mitch in 1969, not sure if the Woodstock guys were that calibre.

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    Haven't heard that one yet. Did they restore Mitch's playing from the actual performance, or does it still have the very obvious overdubs (well, they're obvious if you watch the footage that was used in the Rainbow Bridge movie...Jimi and Mitch are on camera simultaneously, Jimi's in sync but Mitch isn't, because they overdubbed the drums, and he didn't play the same thing during the overdub that he played on the actual show).

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    I picked up the Maui set recently - blog review here.

  3. #28
    ^^
    "A conspiracy of silence speaks louder than words."

    - Dr. Winston O'Boogie

  4. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by pb2015 View Post
    I suppose you'd need to be quite a strong conga player to be audible onstage with Jimi and Mitch in 1969, not sure if the Woodstock guys were that calibre.
    Or have a sound guy who knows how to mic up a set of congas properly, then a soundman who knows how to pot them in the PA mix, and hope that there's no faults during the recording. Hmm, I wonder if the thing about drummers hitting anything and everything within striking distance of their enthusiasm holds true for congaleros.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by ronmac View Post
    Not sure if you're familiar with the official video release of the entire (sans Larry Lee) set. It's super-awesome and uses the best footage instead of the terrible form-over-function footage from the Woodstock movie where we get to see the top of Jimi's head and the tip of his guitar while he's ripping away.
    I have just watched the official video release (ordered on the back of this comment) and the black and white footage shot by that amateur cameraman really is eye-opening. The bonus footage, called Live at Woodstock: A Second Look, is intercut with colour film shot by Michael Wadleigh's team that was used in the original video. But the black and white film is taken from the right of the stage (looking at it) and so the viewer can see Hendrix's interaction with the band. The Wadleigh film gave no suggestion that when Hendrix was looking to his left he was communicating with the others; he just looked a bit distracted. The amateur footage also shows just how small the stage was, with everyone packed in; the Wadleigh team must have been using wide-angle lenses as the impression their footage gives is of a massive stage at Woodstock. Also, because of the fixed cameraman positions used in the Wadleigh film, it looks like only a sparse crowd watched Hendrix, but the black and white footage shows a huge number of people remained for the final act. Another plus is that the black and white footage shows Hendrix playing Hear My Train A Comin', which is not captured by the Wadleigh team. The extra footage really adds a whole lot more to what was already an excellent film.

    And another bonus was watching the short clip of Eddie Kramer talking about his experience at Woodstock and the recording equipment he had at his disposal. Recommended.
    Last edited by Munster; 2 Weeks Ago at 04:19 PM.
    'There are no certain answers and no time to understand / The goal's a changing paradise, a moment out of date'

  6. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by Munster View Post
    I have just watched the official video release (ordered on the back of this comment) and the black and white footage shot by that amateur cameraman really is eye-opening. The bonus footage, called Live at Woodstock: A Second Look, is intercut with colour film shot by Michael Wadleigh's team that was used in the original video. But the black and white film is taken from the right of the stage (looking at it) and so the viewer can see Hendrix's interaction with the band. The Wadleigh film gave no suggestion that when Hendrix was looking to his left he was communicating with the others; he just looked a bit distracted. The amateur footage also shows just how small the stage was, with everyone packed in; the Wadleigh team must have been using wide-angle lenses as the impression their footage gives is of a massive stage at Woodstock. Also, because of the fixed cameraman positions used in the Wadleigh film, it looks like only a sparse crowd watched Hendrix, but the black and white footage shows a huge number of people remained for the final act. Another plus is that the black and white footage shows Hendrix playing Hear My Train A Comin', which is not captured by the Wadleigh team. The extra footage really adds a whole lot more to what was already an excellent film.

    And another bonus was watching the short clip of Eddie Kramer talking about his experience at Woodstock and the recording equipment he had at his disposal. Recommended.
    +1
    "A conspiracy of silence speaks louder than words."

    - Dr. Winston O'Boogie

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