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Thread: Módulo 1000 - intense heavy, raw Brazillian Psych/prog

  1. #1

    Módulo 1000 - intense heavy, raw Brazillian Psych/prog

    Made my day !
    Any fans here ?

  2. #2
    One of the top-10 Brazilian rock albums overall, and also one of the top-10 acid-rock records from South America.

    Its rawness never ceases to amaze me on listening, yet it's still such a marvellously quirky piece of work, as if every tiny detail is somehow elaborately coordinated. Very few of the Brazilian obscurities could show anything near the brilliance of bigger acts like Os Mutantes, Milton Nascimento, Som Imaginario, Caetano Veloso, Novos Baianos, Secos & Molhados or Tom Zé, but M1000 did just that. They were as zany and Brazilian as Second Hand were zany and British.

    A treasure!
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    One of the top-10 Brazilian rock albums overall,
    care to draw a list ?

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    Its rawness never ceases to amaze me
    more then rawness its the passionate intensity that blows me away

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Udi Koomran View Post
    care to draw a list ?
    I am no expert on Brazilian psychedelic music at all, but my interest in psychedelia has led me to look around the globe for the genre and I found the series Love, Peace and Poetry pretty good. It is not definitive and sometimes I would say what is described as psychedelic could rather be termed hard rock, but it is one source for examining a region's offering. I have the African, Turkish and Japanese versions of Love Peace and Poetry and they are all interesting. The CDs were put out from Germany by a producer named Thomas Hartlage, who was also responsible for the reissue label Normal Records. The covers on all the Love, Peace and Poetry releases are odd too. They are of an American model, Cheryl Shrode, a go-go dancer who also appeared in Playboy in 1967.

    https://www.discogs.com/Various-Love...elease/2258112
    Last edited by Munster; 04-26-2021 at 04:54 AM.
    'There are no certain answers and no time to understand / The goal's a changing paradise, a moment out of date'

  6. #6
    Very nice. The storm of guitar riffs is dazzling, but there is also a leaning towards experimentation and inspired improvisation. I just wish there was more of complete, elaborate tracks to support the final result: much of the album is short ideas and interludes, that could have been better developed.

  7. #7
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    I bought this about 20? years ago based on an intriguing description of a reissue in a Wayside catalog. I was very pleasantly surprised and spun it quite a lot in the 00s. Inspired amateurs at their best. If Amon Duul I had possessed some focus they might have sounded something like this...

  8. #8
    Listening now to Paebiru by Lula Cortes and Ze Ramalho. I don't know the other 9 acid rock titles that Richard is referring to, but this has to be in there. Simply incredibly inspired music.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    Milton Nascimento
    Som Imaginario
    Caetano Veloso
    Novos Baianos
    Secos & Molhados
    Tom Zé
    Dear Richard
    Care to recommend were to start ?

  10. #10
    ^ Start with the "usual" recommendations; Acabou Chorare (1972) by Novos Baianos, Secos e Molhados (debut from 1973), Caetano Veloso (s/t from 1969), Tom Zé's Grande Liquidacao (1968) and Matanca do Porco (1973) by Som Imaginario.

    These are all fantastic, and there are great ones by Nascimento, Gal Costa and Jorge Ben as well.

    But the first Brazilian rock record you'd want to start off with at any chance, is Mutantes (1969) by Os Mutantes - their 2nd. album.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  11. #11
    Clube da esquina by Nascimento and Borges is a masterpiece, possibly the most iconic album of its era.

  12. #12
    ^ Absolutely correct, but as with classics by Gilberto Gil and Raul Seixha, Esquina kinda transcends all others here - and goes way into the beyond.

    However, it still need inclusion also for the fact that arrangements (brass, strings et al.) are by Wagner Tiso of Som Imaginario. You can even hear a distant link to some of what he achieved on his own compositions for the Matanca do Porco release, much of which was written at the same time.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    ..for the Matanca do Porco release, much of which was written at the same time.
    I love this, a clearly unique, post-modern record in conception, structure and style. In the strict confines of progressive rock it would be my favourite Brazilian album, along with the late, sans Rita Lee, Mutantes album that I am too lazy to copy paste its title...

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    But the first Brazilian rock record you'd want to start off with at any chance, is Mutantes (1969) by Os Mutantes - their 2nd. album.
    These ones I know well from the old days of the Recommended Records mail catalog
    superb

  15. #15
    I am very curious to know if David Allen and Gong were aware of the Mutantes. There are tangible similarities between these two groups.

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Zappathustra View Post
    I am very curious to know if David Allen and Gong were aware of the Mutantes. There are tangible similarities between these two groups.
    Care to share some tracks that reflect this similarities

  17. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Udi Koomran View Post
    Care to share some tracks that reflect this similarities

    This could be in Camembert Electrique. Easily.


  18. #18
    Today Enjoying
    Marcos Valle Vento Sol
    Edu Lobo - Missa Breve
    Alcides Neves - Tempo de Fratura
    Caetano Veloso

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zappathustra View Post
    Clube da esquina by Nascimento and Borges is a masterpiece, possibly the most iconic album of its era.
    Milton had an incredible run from 1973-1976 beginning with Clube de Esquina. There was also Milagre dos Peixes (sp?), and his major role in Wayne Shorter's Native Dancer, and then on to Minas, Gerais, and the Milton record. Masterpieces every one.

    Milagre in particular was a great attempt at an indigenous Brazilian progressive music if that makes any sense. The Milton album continues some of that feel and also adds a lot of jazz courtesy of Shorter and Herbie Hancock. A&M put some effort into breaking him into the US with the Milton album. Didn't work but still an amazing record.

  20. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    But the first Brazilian rock record you'd want to start off with at any chance, is Mutantes (1969) by Os Mutantes - their 2nd. album.
    While still an excellent timepiece of an album, I'll actually have to adjust and moderate my stand on the matter; today I'd pick A Divina Comédia ou Ando Meio Desligado for starters. It'd may be shorter of studio trickery and pure whim, but the overall stroke of melody, mood and edge outdoes all other variables. What an utterly incredible record.

    Their later, more "prog" efforts were great as well, but I'd arguably deem Comédia their apex statement. This is culturally and politically entirely devastating rock/pop gusto on all imaginable levels.
    Last edited by Scrotum Scissor; 05-01-2021 at 02:25 PM.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  21. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    While still an excellent timepiece of an album, I'll actually have to adjust and moderate my stand on the matter; today I'd pick A Divina Comédia ou Ando Meio Desligado for starters. It'd may be shorter of studio trickery and pure whim, but the overall stroke of melody, mood and edge outdoes all other variables. What an utterly incredible record.

    Their later, more "prog" efforts were great as well, but I'd arguably deem Comédia their apex statement. This is culturally and politically entirely devastating rock/pop gusto on all imaginable levels.
    Both are great, but I still prefer their second album. In any case, you can't go wrong starting with either of them.
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  22. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by arturs View Post
    Milton had an incredible run from 1973-1976 beginning with Clube de Esquina. There was also Milagre dos Peixes (sp?), and his major role in Wayne Shorter's Native Dancer, and then on to Minas, Gerais, and the Milton record. Masterpieces every one.

    Milagre in particular was a great attempt at an indigenous Brazilian progressive music if that makes any sense. The Milton album continues some of that feel and also adds a lot of jazz courtesy of Shorter and Herbie Hancock. A&M put some effort into breaking him into the US with the Milton album. Didn't work but still an amazing record.
    Milagre is weird and beautiful. I don't know the rest, so thanks for the heads up.

    Esquina just creeps in a person's heart and eats it away. It's a pretty emotional affair.

  23. #23
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    Milagre dos Peixes has had most of the lyrics censored by the dictatorship in Brazil at the time. This is why most of of the singing is wordless, with the odd uncensored words appearing here and there throughout the songs. Milagre dos Peixes ao vivo (a live album) is also great with Som Imaginário as support band.

    That said, nothing ever beats the greatness of Minas, which is Milton"s greatest effort IMO. Clube da Esquina 2, Sentinela and Anima are also great ones from the late seventies, early eighties.

  24. #24
    About Som Imaginario, Matança do Porco really is their masterpiece, but the first two are very psychedelic in a similar vein to Modulo 1000, and very worth checking out.
    Perspective Vortex - my new solo project available now at http://perspectivevortex.bandcamp.com
    Mahtrak Progressive Jazz Rock - www.mahtrak.com

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Conti View Post
    Milagre dos Peixes ao vivo (a live album) is also great with Som Imaginário as support band.
    Just ordered this thanks to your suggestion. I'm listening to the completely magical original album right now and look forward to comparing to the live disc. Maybe there will be some more lyrics on that one??

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