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  1. #1
    Moderator Sean's Avatar
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    10cc / Godley & Creme

    Seems every year I turn my attention to a band or artist I never paid much attention to as I was growing up.

    This year's rabbit hole has been all about 10cc and Godley and Creme. I guess it started when I received an email from Kevin Godley's PR firm, offering up a new spoken word companion to his recent solo album (quite a good one), Muscle Memory. I liked what I heard of both and asked for an interview. Kevin was a real gent and gladly talked about his days with 10cc and recent works too. I found the chat to be pretty inspiring. I had a few 10cc albums (How Dare You, Original Soundtrack, Deceptive Bends and Bloody Tourists) and liked them, but this made me want the rest and the G & C albums too, none of which I heard yet, so a lot of amazing music awaited me.

    I was pleasantly surprised when I heard the first 10cc album and the follow up, Sheet Music. Those two I think are their best. Really brilliant stuff (save for a few tracks). The next two seem a little more premeditated, and more mature and refined. I know “One Night In Paris” is considered their grand moment in many ways, but it's down the list a ways for me.

    “I'm Not In Love” has become their best known tune but also caused a lot of confusion about band's identity. It makes a lot of Yacht Rock playlists and some people foolishly assume their catalog is full of similar soft rock. They are quite wrong, as that was really the first tune they wrote in that vein. There would be several on the later albums though. Too many and none as memorable as “I'm Not In Love”.

    The How Dare You album offered up their most polished works to date. “I'm Mandy (Fly Me)” is easily one of their most ambitious tunes and compelling. “Don't Hang Up” seems the perfect tune for G and C to call their last with the group.

    Deceptive Bends is up there with the first four, and seems to tick all the boxes a great 10cc album needs. That was the first one after Godley and Creme left. Stewart and Gouldman managed to channel their humor and wacky sensibilities on that one. "Good Morning, Judge" is a good example. "Feel The Benefit" is an epic moment no matter how you slice it. Even if it sort of quotes other tunes. Dear Prudence, anyone?

    Bloody Tourists was the follow up and the wacky side of the band is toned WAY down. A trend that continued on the following records, all of which seem a little less inspired with every outing. The addition of Tim Fenn and other new members made for a very solid live band with a lot more polish than the original band. But musically it's pretty dull. Only a few tracks from later albums like Look Hear (check out the proggy, “Welcome To The World”) and Ten Out of 10 seem to make much of a lasting impression. Which showed me that what I liked best about of 10cc was the input from Godley and Creme.

    That inspired me to pick up all of their albums. Consequences, L and Freeze Frame on vinyl. I eventually got their entire output on CD in a great boxed set- the 5 CD Body of Work box. The L album and the follow up, Freeze Frame really spoke to me. They took the more wack moments of 10cc and built on them in very uncompromising ways. Their love of Zappa really comes to the fore on this too, with a great emphasis on percussion. Especially on L. I find these records to be as satisfying as the best 10cc albums. The albums that follow Freeze Frame have their moments and are never as dull as later 10cc, but things get a bit smoothed out. BTW, the three album box Consequences (their first outing as a duo and the of the most ambitious “prog” albums from anyone). It is a world of it's own and demands repeated listening. There's much to love once you dig in. From the orchestral first side that shows the Gizmotron in all it's infinite sustain glory, to the last of the discs that offered up more wacky “pop” tunes and even a great duet between Kevin and Sarah Vaughan. Those (Lol and Kevin) guys were so darn brilliant. Eric and Graham were no slouches either.

    So.... what are YOUR favorite 10cc and Godley and Creme albums? How about individual tracks? Anyone see 10cc live? Do tell.

  2. #2
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    L was my favorite album when I was about 18 or so. I heard t when it first came out. I was amazed by it and then went backwards, buying all the 10cc album with Lol and Kev.

    I thought (and still think) that they (the 10cc albums) are wildly uneven, but the great stuff is still really enjoyable to me and I have even grown to love some of the tracks that seemed kinda lightweight at the time (“I love to hear those convicts squeal! It’s a shame these slugs ain’t real”).

    And, of course, “I’m Not In Love” is a technological marvel for its time AND a brilliantly crafted work, imo. (check this out if you have never seen it)



    While I was working on ’Things Are More....’ with Tom, it was my single biggest influence of trying to achieve something with just two people and a tape recorder. I can admit this fact because no one would ever be able to guess that by listening to our album!
    Last edited by Steve F.; 04-25-2021 at 04:57 PM.
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  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve F. View Post
    L was my favorite album when I was about 18 or so. I heard t when it first came out. I was amazed by it and then went backwards, buying all the 10cc album with Lol and Kev.

    I thought (and still think) that they (the 10cc albums) are wildly uneven, but the great stuff is still really enjoyable to me and I have even grown to love some of the tracks that seemed kinda lightweight at the time (“I love to hear those convicts squeal! It’s a shame these slugs ain’t real”).

    And, of course, “I’m Not In Love” is a technological marvel for its time AND a brilliantly crafted work, imo. (check this out if you have never seen it)



    While I was working on ’Things Are More....’ with Tom, it was my single biggest influence of trying to achieve something with just two people and a tape recorder. I can admit this fact because no one would ever be able to guess that by listening to our album!
    That was great, thanks for posting.

  4. #4
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    Sheet Music and The Original Soundtrack are their best for me. They were truly firing on all cylinders on those two albums. I do like the heavier tracks like 'Silly Love', 'The Wall Street Shuffle', 'The Second Sitting For The Last Supper' etc.

    I wouldn't say 'I'm Not In Love' (probably their creative pinnacle) is 'yacht rock'. They have a few songs which definitely leaned into that- of which more later- but this isn't one of them. It's a truly inventive production and obviously the lyrical conceit is all about over-the-top denial. So it's a sort of anti-love song, that's still a love song.

    How Dare You has moments which are as good but also things like 'I Wanna Rule The World', 'Iceberg' and 'Head Room' where a smugness set in, IMHO. I agree that the two singles and 'Don't Hang Up' are magnificent. And I've always liked the instrumental title track.

    The more 'yacht' songs in their oeuvre came after Godley and Creme left. 'The Things We Do For Love' springs to mind- a good song, but it doesn't have as much depth. That one plays alongside- say- Andrew Gold who Gouldman would later work with. And I think you can easily put 'Dreadlock Holiday' alongside the more annoying end of 'yacht' like 'Escape (The Pina Colada Song)'.

    I played the double live Live And Let Live a while back which was from the Deceptive Bends tour. All a bit rote, I thought. Not much atmosphere, arrangements that are just 'the studio version but not as good', and nothing by Godley/Creme was played.

  5. #5
    Hi Sean! In a similar way 10cc wasn't on my radar until a few years ago. I always loved "I'm Not in Love," it was one of those songs that haunted me when I was younger, but didn't associate it with 10cc somehow. Picked up Sheet Music through Deceptive Bends, all mostly-good to great albums. I'd be tempted to call them a Beatles of the 70's, in the way they innovated in the studio, but based around solid pop-rock writing. I also prefer the Godley and Creme side of the business, and am completely intrigued by Consequences (I describe to people as the weirdest album I own that I actually enjoy). Oddly enough I don't own any other G&C albums but will rectify that shortly

    By the way, loved the interview with Kevin, any chance of interviewing Lol?
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  6. #6
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    I doubt it. I'm reading their recent bio "The Worst Band In The World" and he was the only one of the four that refused to chat with the author. I doubt I'd stand a chance. I have written GG's people a few times though. No reply...yet.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sean View Post
    I doubt it. I'm reading their recent bio "The Worst Band In The World" and he was the only one of the four that refused to chat with the author. I doubt I'd stand a chance. I have written GG's people a few times though. No reply...yet.
    There was a BBC documentary- I think it's where that YouTube link is taken from- where all four contributed. It's very good.

  8. #8
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    Here's one the best 10cc tunes. Graham tours with his own 10cc these days and occasionally Kevin drops by and sings a tune. GG asked him to sing this one and he declined and sent this vid instead to play while they played it live. Great rendition. Kev's voice still sounds amazing.



    "Over the years I've performed the odd song or two with #GrahamGouldman​'s touring version of #10cc​ but when he asked me to sing #SomewhereInHollywood​ for their tour I balked. It's a complex song and a bastard to perform live so I re - recorded the vocal to minimal instrumentation and made a film of myself singing so the band could accompany that on stage. Naturally I ended up throwing in a few visual enhancements as the thought of a 20 foot close - up of my face fills me with horror. "- KG

    Here's a couple other faves...


    Love that simple two chord, two note guitar riff.


    One of the best uses of the Gizmotron, IMO.

    They got the most unique guitar sounds on their records. They really knew how to make those guitars pop in the mix too. True on the G & C stuff as well. That acoustic sound on "Sandwiches of You" or that wacky, visceral solo guitar tone on "I Pity Inanimate Objects". That one would make Fripp blush.
    Last edited by Sean; 04-25-2021 at 06:13 PM.

  9. #9
    Would love to hear from Graham as well, very talented songwriter.
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  10. #10
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    "Doooooo, Do Not Disturb! The sign on the door says...Do Not Disturb!"

    Brilliant!



    I should stop and point out what amazing wordsmiths these two were. Few in rock compare. Here's a great example...



    L and Freeze Frame really clicked right away. The later ones seemed tamer, though some have their moments. Like this one...


  11. #11
    Member Steve F.'s Avatar
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    This is - I think - genuinely live and not mimed


    Steve F.

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    Any time any one speaks to me about any musical project, the one absolute given is "it will not make big money". [tip of the hat to HK]

    "Death to false 'support the scene' prog!"

    please add 'imo' wherever you like, to avoid offending those easily offended.

  12. #12
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    Well, I suppose I'm in the same place as Sean was when he started his pilgrimage. I know the 1975-78 albums, having arrived at the earlier ones through the later ones' chart hits. I also have Live and Let Live, their first live album. I would say that the Godley & Creme ones are my favorites, but I clearly should do more exploring.

  13. #13
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    Love that footage. "Fresh Air For My Momma" is a great tune.

  14. #14
    Mini-thoughts on ALL their albums!

    10cc: We all have to start somewhere! Incredibly, this was a bit of a controversial record at the time for containing curse words (“piss” and “shit” were just not found on pop records back in 1973. Well, except for this one). I guess “Rubber Bullets” raised the ire of the BBC (must have been the title, coupled with the intimation of prison sex in the lyrics). G&C in particular were influenced by Zappa, but it seems that their collection here stopped at Freak Out!, as the majority of this seems to be 50s and 60s pop-pastiche comedy numbers. There’s a few tunes that transcend it, the aforementioned “Fresh Air for My Momma” a perfect example.

    Sheet Music: A quantum leap forward. This is probably my favorite by them: every song is fantastic, and the diversity is off the charts. I really love all the sonic detail that they pack into every song; “Hotel,” “Old Wild Men” and “Somewhere in Hollywood” in particular, but I wouldn’t want to be without anything here. No skips.

    [I]The Original Soundtrack[I]: More or less on a par with SM, perhaps slightly lesser, but the highlights are so grand it makes it stand out. “I’m Not in Love” is like a “Good Vibrations” for the 70s. These guys really know how to make a lot out of a little; “Une nuit a Paris” is little more than piano, some percussion, and vocals. A TON of vocals!

    How Dare You!: You can see the cracks in the foundation here. “I Wanna Rule the World” and “Head Room” are utterly cringeworthy, and I can never even remember how “Rock & Roll Lullaby” goes after it’s finished. That said, there’s a few real gems here that make it a must-own. If “I’m Not in Love” is their “Good Vibrations,” I guess that makes “Don’t Hang Up” their “Surf’s Up.” (Kevin Godley and his achingly beautiful voice really was their secret weapon)

    Deceptive Bends: “The Things We Do For Love” was my favorite song when I was six years old, so obviously I have a soft spot for this one. You can hear Gouldman & Stewart attempting to cover for the loss of G&C by trying to write songs like they would (“Good Morning Judge,” “I Bought a Flat Guitar Tutor,” “You’ve Got a Cold”). That they were even a little successful probably explains why this one is as good as it is. “People in Love,” alas, points towards their disappointing future.

    Bloody Tourists: Well, I kind of liked “The Anonymous Alcoholic,” but too much of this hinges on obvious “jokes,” MOR blandness and the sort of clichés this band used to mercilessly mock. “On a roller-coaster,” “on the road to ruin,” “on a one-way street,” and that’s all on track 2 (“For You and I,” which kind of sounds like a neutered version of “With a Little Luck”)!

    Look Hear?: It seems most folks agree that 10cc’s worst song can be found on this album, but nobody seems to agree on which song that is. Doesn’t bode well, does it? For what it’s worth, I did enjoy “Welcome to the World” and at least “L.A. Inflatable” ends the album on an energetic note. Trivia time: “One Two Five” was the first music video I ever saw (pre-MTV, on HBO’s Video Jukebox).

    Ten Out of 10: Well, it’s an improvement over the disaster that is Look Hear?, but it’s still pretty slim pickin’s. The US version with Andrew Gold involvement is better yet, though “We’ve Heard It All Before”—their jab at the then-more-commercially-successful G&C (replete with unflattering Kevin Godley impression by Eric)—seems awfully petty (their petulant revenge for “Hit Factory/Business Is Business” perhaps?). And did they need to tack on the dreary single “Run Away,” the neutered version of “I’m Not in Love”?

    Windows in the Jungle: A nice return-to-form, to my ears. Bookended by two superb demi-epics, and thankfully the bland MOR that characterized the last three albums seems toned down here. I’d complain about the overlong, soporific “Yes I Am!” if it didn’t segue into one of my favorite songs on the album, “Americana Panorama.”

    Consequences: It seems I like this less each time I hear it. Disc One contains exactly ONE song, and it’s a silly Hawaiian pastiche that’s little more than another excuse for Lol to use his Minnie Mouse voice. Side 6 is an interesting neo-classical prog suite which nonetheless isn’t going to trouble any of the genre’s leading lights. What’s in between is almost unendurable; a painfully unfunny Peter Cook (You did Bedazzled, and now you’re offering us this crap?) voicing half a dozen unlikable characters, interspersed by half a dozen forgettable songs. Best exemplified by the 20 page booklet, which seems to say, “Ha ha! We’re dumping dirt on a dummy head on Mercury Records’ dime!”

    L: Proof that Freak Out! was not the only Zappa album these guys listened to. Warped, eccentric art pop with endearing prog flourishes and acerbic wit.

    Freeze-Frame: My favorite G&C album. Less of the prog feel of the previous album, but more experimental, if that makes sense. No skips.

    Ismism: Half good, half annoying. I guess I wouldn’t mind this one so much if it didn’t have so much spoken-word stuff, which is one of my pet-peeves in music.

    Birds of Prey: I remember precisely zero about this album, which I guess is not a good sign.

    The History Mix, Vol. 1: One of the most masturbatory, self-referential albums in music history. A bunch of old 10cc/G&C song snippets barfed out by a Fairlight, the result being tuneless mush. The exception is the splendid “Cry,” and you’re better off getting that in its single version.

    Goodbye Blue Sky: You know, I should probably sit down and listen to this all the way through one day. Reviews are mixed, and I run hot and cold on G&C in general, but the very idea of a concept album about Armageddon featuring harmonica on every track intrigues me. And I do have a soft spot for “A Little Piece of Heaven,” the only track from this I have heard.

    Bonus props to the excellent B-sides “Waterfall” and “Good News,” our last glimpses of G&C’s origins as folk-rockers.
    Confirmed Bachelors: the dramedy hit of 1883...

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Progbear View Post
    Bloody Tourists: Well, I kind of liked “The Anonymous Alcoholic,” but too much of this hinges on obvious “jokes,” MOR blandness and the sort of clichés this band used to mercilessly mock. “On a roller-coaster,” “on the road to ruin,” “on a one-way street,” and that’s all on track 2 (“For You and I,” which kind of sounds like a neutered version of “With a Little Luck”)!
    I listened to some of this album yesterday. I liked "For You and I," which does sound like a Wings song, but with a sarcastic edge McCartney never had. After that the MOR did get a bit much, though. Made Supertramp sound like a punk band.

  16. #16
    "The Things We Do For Love" is my favorite song of theirs. Judging from the others I've heard, they were very smart but there wasn't a lot there I connected with, but I'll listen again sometime soon.

    I found a cheap copy of Consequences a while ago and I remember enjoying the randomness of having Sarah Vaughan do a duet with Kevin on one song.

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    There is also the earlier Hotlegs project which was Godley, Creme and Stewart, with Gouldman offering a cameo. Patchy but definitely has its moments and signs of things to come. I like 'Today' (re-recorded as a single under the band name Festival) and the 'Take Me Back' suite.

    Godley and Creme had a slow start commercially but eventually overtook their former band. They had a few early 80s hits, but also went on to be in-demand directors of promo videos. It was that 'An Englishman In New York' promo above which kickstarted that career for them.

  18. #18
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    10cc were the first proper band i got into aged about 13. The first five are classics, my fave is probably Deceptive Bends or maybe How Dare You. Bloody Tourists was the last I bought, good in parts but had started to move away from that 10cc sound.

    Sent from my SM-T290 using Tapatalk

  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Progbear View Post
    Mini-thoughts on ALL their albums!

    10cc: We all have to start somewhere! Incredibly, this was a bit of a controversial record at the time for containing curse words (“piss” and “shit” were just not found on pop records back in 1973. Well, except for this one). I guess “Rubber Bullets” raised the ire of the BBC (must have been the title, coupled with the intimation of prison sex in the lyrics). G&C in particular were influenced by Zappa, but it seems that their collection here stopped at Freak Out!, as the majority of this seems to be 50s and 60s pop-pastiche comedy numbers. There’s a few tunes that transcend it, the aforementioned “Fresh Air for My Momma” a perfect example.

    Sheet Music: A quantum leap forward. This is probably my favorite by them: every song is fantastic, and the diversity is off the charts. I really love all the sonic detail that they pack into every song; “Hotel,” “Old Wild Men” and “Somewhere in Hollywood” in particular, but I wouldn’t want to be without anything here. No skips.

    [I]The Original Soundtrack[I]: More or less on a par with SM, perhaps slightly lesser, but the highlights are so grand it makes it stand out. “I’m Not in Love” is like a “Good Vibrations” for the 70s. These guys really know how to make a lot out of a little; “Une nuit a Paris” is little more than piano, some percussion, and vocals. A TON of vocals!

    How Dare You!: You can see the cracks in the foundation here. “I Wanna Rule the World” and “Head Room” are utterly cringeworthy, and I can never even remember how “Rock & Roll Lullaby” goes after it’s finished. That said, there’s a few real gems here that make it a must-own. If “I’m Not in Love” is their “Good Vibrations,” I guess that makes “Don’t Hang Up” their “Surf’s Up.” (Kevin Godley and his achingly beautiful voice really was their secret weapon)

    Deceptive Bends: “The Things We Do For Love” was my favorite song when I was six years old, so obviously I have a soft spot for this one. You can hear Gouldman & Stewart attempting to cover for the loss of G&C by trying to write songs like they would (“Good Morning Judge,” “I Bought a Flat Guitar Tutor,” “You’ve Got a Cold”). That they were even a little successful probably explains why this one is as good as it is. “People in Love,” alas, points towards their disappointing future.

    Bloody Tourists: Well, I kind of liked “The Anonymous Alcoholic,” but too much of this hinges on obvious “jokes,” MOR blandness and the sort of clichés this band used to mercilessly mock. “On a roller-coaster,” “on the road to ruin,” “on a one-way street,” and that’s all on track 2 (“For You and I,” which kind of sounds like a neutered version of “With a Little Luck”)!

    Look Hear?: It seems most folks agree that 10cc’s worst song can be found on this album, but nobody seems to agree on which song that is. Doesn’t bode well, does it? For what it’s worth, I did enjoy “Welcome to the World” and at least “L.A. Inflatable” ends the album on an energetic note. Trivia time: “One Two Five” was the first music video I ever saw (pre-MTV, on HBO’s Video Jukebox).

    Ten Out of 10: Well, it’s an improvement over the disaster that is Look Hear?, but it’s still pretty slim pickin’s. The US version with Andrew Gold involvement is better yet, though “We’ve Heard It All Before”—their jab at the then-more-commercially-successful G&C (replete with unflattering Kevin Godley impression by Eric)—seems awfully petty (their petulant revenge for “Hit Factory/Business Is Business” perhaps?). And did they need to tack on the dreary single “Run Away,” the neutered version of “I’m Not in Love”?

    Windows in the Jungle: A nice return-to-form, to my ears. Bookended by two superb demi-epics, and thankfully the bland MOR that characterized the last three albums seems toned down here. I’d complain about the overlong, soporific “Yes I Am!” if it didn’t segue into one of my favorite songs on the album, “Americana Panorama.”

    Consequences: It seems I like this less each time I hear it. Disc One contains exactly ONE song, and it’s a silly Hawaiian pastiche that’s little more than another excuse for Lol to use his Minnie Mouse voice. Side 6 is an interesting neo-classical prog suite which nonetheless isn’t going to trouble any of the genre’s leading lights. What’s in between is almost unendurable; a painfully unfunny Peter Cook (You did Bedazzled, and now you’re offering us this crap?) voicing half a dozen unlikable characters, interspersed by half a dozen forgettable songs. Best exemplified by the 20 page booklet, which seems to say, “Ha ha! We’re dumping dirt on a dummy head on Mercury Records’ dime!”

    L: Proof that Freak Out! was not the only Zappa album these guys listened to. Warped, eccentric art pop with endearing prog flourishes and acerbic wit.

    Freeze-Frame: My favorite G&C album. Less of the prog feel of the previous album, but more experimental, if that makes sense. No skips.

    Ismism: Half good, half annoying. I guess I wouldn’t mind this one so much if it didn’t have so much spoken-word stuff, which is one of my pet-peeves in music.

    Birds of Prey: I remember precisely zero about this album, which I guess is not a good sign.

    The History Mix, Vol. 1: One of the most masturbatory, self-referential albums in music history. A bunch of old 10cc/G&C song snippets barfed out by a Fairlight, the result being tuneless mush. The exception is the splendid “Cry,” and you’re better off getting that in its single version.

    Goodbye Blue Sky: You know, I should probably sit down and listen to this all the way through one day. Reviews are mixed, and I run hot and cold on G&C in general, but the very idea of a concept album about Armageddon featuring harmonica on every track intrigues me. And I do have a soft spot for “A Little Piece of Heaven,” the only track from this I have heard.

    Bonus props to the excellent B-sides “Waterfall” and “Good News,” our last glimpses of G&C’s origins as folk-rockers.

    Talking of swear words, Second Sitting For The Last Supper contains the N word. Different times...

    I am surprised the 10cc catalogue has not had a proper remastering, as in remixed with a 5.1 option. Sonically there is a lot of interesting stuff to play with. I don't ever recall an official box set of any kind.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rogue Mail View Post
    I don't ever recall an official box set of any kind.
    There was "Tenology" a few years back. I"ve never seen it, though.

    https://superdeluxeedition.com/news/...-disc-box-set/

    And for G&C there was "Body of Work."

    https://superdeluxeedition.com/news/...ve-cd-box-set/

    Plus the "Before, During, and After" set.

    https://superdeluxeedition.com/news/...-10cc-box-set/

    But yeah, some 5.1 mixes would be very welcome.

  21. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by pb2015 View Post
    I found a cheap copy of Consequences a while ago and I remember enjoying the randomness of having Sarah Vaughan do a duet with Kevin on one song.
    I have to wonder how that connection came along. One of the strangest duet pairings ever (even if both Kevin and Sarah have exquisite voices).

    Quote Originally Posted by JJ88 View Post
    There is also the earlier Hotlegs project which was Godley, Creme and Stewart, with Gouldman offering a cameo. Patchy but definitely has its moments and signs of things to come. I like 'Today' (re-recorded as a single under the band name Festival) and the 'Take Me Back' suite.
    What I’ve heard of the Hotlegs album suggests that there was still a lot of Kev & Lol’s folk-rock base. I liked that on “Waterfall” and “Good News,” so I should probably sit down with the Hotlegs album and give it a serious airing. I do know that the “Take me away, just about time to hit the road...” bit of “Fresh Air for My Mama” originated in a Hotlegs song: “You Didn’t Like It Because You Didn’t Think of It,” the non-album B-side to “Neanderthal Man.”



    Quote Originally Posted by Rogue Mail View Post
    Talking of swear words, Second Sitting For The Last Supper contains the N word. Different times...
    I forgot about that. Ugh! I get that they were going for an extended metaphor, but still...ugh!
    Confirmed Bachelors: the dramedy hit of 1883...

  22. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by pb2015 View Post
    "The Things We Do For Love" is my favorite song of theirs. Judging from the others I've heard, they were very smart but there wasn't a lot there I connected with, but I'll listen again sometime soon.

    I found a cheap copy of Consequences a while ago and I remember enjoying the randomness of having Sarah Vaughan do a duet with Kevin on one song.
    I have a soft spot for it because it was the first song I ever sang at a karaoke. It's a song I just find easy to sing along to, though these days I doubt I would hit the notes...

  23. #23
    This is a band I really should investigate. Of their hits, I still love "Rubber Bullets". WHat album is that from? Probably where I should start...
    Maka ki ecela tehani yanke lo!

  24. #24
    Member Steve F.'s Avatar
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    ^ ^ ^

    Ruber Bullets is from their first, s/t album.
    Steve F.

    www.waysidemusic.com
    www.cuneiformrecords.com

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    Any time any one speaks to me about any musical project, the one absolute given is "it will not make big money". [tip of the hat to HK]

    "Death to false 'support the scene' prog!"

    please add 'imo' wherever you like, to avoid offending those easily offended.

  25. #25
    Member thedunno's Avatar
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    I love those first 4 10CC albums. For me they are something special. They had the songwriting craft of Stewart & Gouldman and the expirimental vision of Godley & Creme. I think the albums after the split, Deceptive bends, bloody tourists, L and Consequences, were all good but those early 10CC albums were special.

    If I had to pick a favorite it would be sheet music

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