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Thread: Question? Who were the beginners of Prog?

  1. #76
    @Dana

    “Now, where do we put United States of America?... Or Silver Apples?... Or even Ultimate Spinach?”

    On the dang “buy” list! Where else? These were GREAT albums. Kudos, dude!!

    If you were asking how I would “genre” them I would suggest: pre-Prog, avant-Prog, Prog, pysch, space, or braunschweiger Prog. I don’t care – label them as you please! I am hip to what you call `em. Don’t you think I have learned anything so far? I don’t “know” “prog” – and I don’t care – it is the music that matters to me. Label it as you so please -it’s cool for me! (You remember? Pink Floyd was called space rock prior to 1975!) I really don’t give a rat’s @ about labels – it is the music and the bands. All I give a damn about – too dang old for arguments of this ilk.

    As to music dump:

    USA sounds like Airplane a bit (more on that in a moment)

    Silver Apples? I am a total sucker for the groovy `60’s sound. Question? Do year Donovan in there? What I was thinking. But that sound showed up in early Pink (“Piper”), but w/o the surfer dude beach music of Dick Dale (On “Piper”)!
    Ultimate?

    “Center of your mind”? Were these guys influenced by Lou Reed and the Velvet Underground? Just asking…


    -------------------------------------------------------
    Now to augment your prior comment about Elton John (“Funeral”), here is some avant-garde Airplane. (some strange songs about a weird house near Pooneil) Are they prog? Or really prog-like:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MiRC8XKCMa8


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lHmiFHzPqbM



    Ditto goes for this band. Came from Carlo’s band (at least Gregg and Neal did, Neal was Carlos’s protégé remember? And Aynsley came from Zappa’s Mothers). Prog????(I hate Steve Perry – took the band to Power Pop: ugh!) Nope, prog-like:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mcO30DWzxF8

  2. #77
    @Dana continued - didn't realize there was a 3 vid clip limit - crap!

    Continuing:


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SRKZ_f67vTw


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qos_8sfT3zE



    Edited Comments:
    Neil listening to some Al Dimeola here or what? We are far from Escape folks! 99% of Journey fans do not know this music exists and would be SHOCKED
    23

    Dan Gardner
    4 years ago
    It's funny, I was telling my nephew how much I liked Journey & he was saying "Yeah, but they didn't jam like the other bands of that era." I played him this album & he was amazed. The only things he ever heard was with Perry.
    65

    Marc Pizzutiello
    4 years ago
    Aynsley Dunbar keeps this song so tight!! Amazing talent!
    34

    Larry Marsden
    4 years ago
    Ainsley, Schon, Rollie, were all awesome on this album. When that chemistry was abandoned for the pop culture, a huge part of the musicianship left as well, sadly.
    61

    Alexander Wyatt
    6 years ago
    This is so far ahead of it's time, especially in terms of how heavy it is. You can really hear them influencing Dream Theater on this track.
    22

    Jeff Hancock
    3 years ago
    Parts of it sound like Cavaranserai. Favorite Journey album. Dunbar kicks ass.
    11

    David Agliano
    3 years ago
    trapped on dessert island, turn table and THIS ALBUM...I could live with it...
    13

    John J
    8 years ago
    This is total progressive rock! I love it! I wish they would play this awesome early Journey stuff on the radio.
    5

    John Ault
    1 year ago
    The first three Journey. Look into the future next....best lps ever


    ---------------------------------------------------
    Ya’ see. It’s all about the music///////////

  3. #78
    @Dana
    Wrapping up this puppy (finally! Oh mon dieu!)


    ----------------------------------------------------
    Circling back to Nil? What is your take on these guys (no, I don’ want you to genre them – just your take). Played this for my uncle. He said” oh, that’s French rock” (he is French). (Hey! I think there is an important message in that! Very important!)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xZDZwmXjR2c




    ------------------------------------------------------

    Dana, you may not be getting this, but the central question was “Who were the beginners of Prog?”. Ya’ see? Understanding the roots of various music forms has been my exercise of the past 2 decades. I think I got classic rock (landed @ Howlin’ Wolf, BB King, et. al.), Jazz Fusion (landed @ Bee Bop Jazz – Billie Holiday is awesome!), now it is Prog Rock’s turn. I don’t have to be lectured on why ELP’s Trilogy is “Prog” rock…

    I want to thank you for divulging the small discography of the “beginnings”. I would strongly urge you to provide more of the stuff you know. It is the reason I am here. My buy list keeps growing!



    -------------------------------------



    “My bad, Iluvatar- I got Focus confused with Golden Earring. I mean, anyone could right? ”
    I wouldn’t sweat it. At my age, “senior moments” seem to be occurring more and more frequently; it might have been from too much “Sex, Drugs, and Rock & Roll” from the `70’s (grin!). But I still seem to be able to retrieve albums (CDs now) from my collection – keeps me sharp,
    Peace,
    Iluv


    ------------------------------







    P.S. We should take a short break and just relax. Let’s stop worrying about genres and hunker down to some good music. I doff my hat to the bikers who blast “Born to be Wild”, this is for them:


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w25xghugIdg






    Gary Partain
    7 years ago
    I was abducted by the Jefferson UFO when I was 16. I'm 60 now, and it still hasn't landed. I hope it never does.
    140

    chad soard
    7 years ago
    This song is very underrated.I think it is one of Jefferson Airplane's best tracks and also one of Grace Slick's best.She did a great job writing this and there is a mixture of so many types of music.The electric in this song is Amazing!There are actually two studio Hey Fredrick's and the only thing that is different is the way Grace sings it.
    44

    hermitcrabbot
    8 years ago (edited)
    Still, after 51 years, America's Greatest Rock Group.
    24

    The Hallowed Ground
    4 years ago
    Grace's vocals in this are amazing, such a good song to blast out.
    53

    Terri White
    8 years ago
    This is my 'driving fast on the freeway' music. The voice is on full automatic in this song. When someone better comes along, I'll listen but until then...she's the one!
    25

    Larry Beckham
    5 years ago
    A masterpiece. The interplay between Nicky and Jorma over the ployrhythm section of Spencer and Jack with Paul's understated guitar following Grace's tour de force prove to anyone with ears, hearts and open minds that indeed JEFFERSON LOVES YOU!
    38

    Terri White
    8 years ago
    I have blown out speakers in my car playing this so loud. $108 to replace a front speaker. She's awesome!!!
    14

    NimmerSoft
    4 years ago
    "Hey Fredrick" Either go away or go all the way in Look at what you hold Come back down on a spear of silence When it flies You go on through You come on through Thr rediculous no Oh no One more pair of Loving eyes look down on you Sheets and a pillow How old will you have to be before you Stop believing That those eyes will look down on you That way forever There you sit mouth wide open Animals nipping at your sides On wire wheels the four stroke man Opens wide The marching sound The constant ride On the gasket is mine All mine One more pair of Wire wheels bear down on you Gear stripping the willow How many machine men will you see before you Stop believing that speed Will slide down on you Like brakes in bad weather
    40

    jmcgericault
    8 years ago
    One of the Airplane's most under-appreciated songs. Which is a shame.

  4. #79
    Iluvatar- truth is, the Airplane were everything to me back in 1967-68, when I was but 14-15yo. Jack Casady was by far the coolest dude on the planet, and he is why I took up bass. I have a picture of him taken by a famous photographer (Baron Wolman) up in my room at home. And like you say, I do not sweat genres, unless I am engaging in conversations like this. I just like what I like, no matter where it falls on some atomization process of music. As to Nil, I have stuff by them, and they fit into the Zeuhl category as being influenced by Magma, and as Magma is my favorite band of all time, I likes 'em.

    This is my Casady pic: http://fotobaron.com/print/68118-23/

    Most of the music I posted were categorized as heavy psychedelic music when it came out. As would be, say, Inagaddadavida by Iron Butterfly, which really has some prog hallmarks. But I do think some of these bands paved the way for others. Now, King Crimson seemed to emerge whole out of nowhere with that first epic record. I remember it well. It was so far ahead of anything else at the time. To me, that is really the first actual prog disc. And Journey was, to me, a fusion band when they began- see "Kohoutek," for example. I remember running into Neil Schon at the Rosemont Horizon in the Chicago 'burbs when I was at a conference and he was staying there for a show that night at the Horizon. Sort of, hey, isn't that Neil Schon? And no one really was stopping by him, so I said a hello and spent a minute chatting. Me, in a suit...
    I'm not lazy. I just work so fast I'm always done.

  5. #80
    ^^^^^^^^^^^ Dana:

    Just dropping some thoughts before it becomes a forgotten senior moment.
    Amen on Airplane. I got no photos. Jorma was my hero.

    I am starting to read some books. You would not be the only one who would attribute Prog Rock’s beginnings in “heavy” psychedelic. I think there is merit in that take. (Still like Donovan tho’)

    About Magma? I am surprised I never collected. I have read rave reviews of these guys over the past 4 decades but never took action. I think it is time allocate funds to a starter collection. Appreciate the info. (after all, anyone who claims to be influenced by Coltrane has got to be good!)

    I have a story to tell about Iron, gonna save it for later – but yeah!
    Agree on KC’s “Court of” – out of nowhere. Break-through & progenitor – Holy Cow.

    Journey was late to the show, so to speak. Much of the formative music was already done. But! They were good until they were ruined by Steve (oh mon dieu…). Glad you got to see Neal. He was a boss man.
    Due to the occurrence at the same time, I always bundle another group called Kansas with them. I am particularly fond of the Buddha statement herein “Hymn to the Atman”:



    A story. Try to keep it short. Summer `82, Quebec city, Canada. Walking down a small rue in Old Quebec city after draining 2 bottles of Chateau Neuf du Pape and a huge dinner at the restaurant at Fairmont Le Chateau Frontenac; we were frosty. Passing by a quaint old pub, I heard a lilt. Hey! Hold on! Let’s go inside – I hear something. And there was the Pat Metheny group. And Lyle was there (RIP)! They were playing this lilt (San Lorenzo):



    Longer version, here: (beautiful song)


    We just had dinner @ the Chateau – we wearing suits & ties…

  6. #81
    Here's what I posted in the thread on 'Group and orchestras', more specifically as response to Udi (Koomran) concerning Days of Future Passed and why In the Court of the Crimson kind of appears to have culturally robbed the former's status of "first (UK) progressive".

    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    this is merely a classic example of a retroactive taxonomy. Progressive rock - or what the term soon came to denote - was itself clearly at play before the debut KC; with groups who stretched the hitherto boundaries of so-called psychedelic rock to completely uncharted terrains as with Zappa/Mothers, Spirit, Kaleidoscope, Soft Machine, Touch, first two Family, Procol, The Nice and yeah, the Moodies indeed.

    Truth be told, the reference to Future Passed did play a part in contemporary reviews of In the Court. You can read as much in the booklet to the Young Person's Guide to KC compilation as well as other places. I suppose some of the reason why the "first 'real' prog" tag stuck with In the Court is that it displayed more of certain traits, such as tight interplay, venomous riffing, improvisations and fantasy lyrics. Still, songs like "Epitaph" and the title track are directly rooted in Future Passed and Lost Chord.
    FWIW, I still consider Soft Machine Volume Two to be the first bonafide coherent and unified progressive rock record from Britain, with essentially all assets of the term highlighted. It was released one month before ItCotCK and Sea Shanties by High Tide, and as avant-garde or more than both.

    Days of Future Passed, Ars Longa Vita Brevis and Shine On Brightly certainly preceded it, but they weren't fully formed within a conceptual assessment of style or aesthetic as regards the term. These all informed the soon-to-be burgeoning "symphonic" rock movement, of course.

    As for Clouds, I always loved their two albums. They are great vintage UK progressive artifacts and highly listenable for melodic content, mood and (partly) performance. But they are not as historically unheralded as some claim; rather their reputation as originators of an extremely broad genre has been somewhat overblown, as I see it, being an historian and former music writer myself. "Waiter, There's Something In My Soup" from their debut (Scrapbook) definitely introduces the orchestral, narrative epic in British pop/rock, but this was summer 1969 and The Who had already done a pseudo-mini-pop/rock-opera ("A Quick One") long before this.

    As for the US, I still believe Pet Sounds or Absolutely Free would qualify. The Touch album is seminal and quite wonderful, but in all fairness that debut Sea Train record was actually tighter in composed density and was released in the same month as the Touch (January '69). I've found myself championing both, though.

    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  7. #82
    Member Piskie's Avatar
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    I always feel that because Fripp was cool because he played on Bowie albums and was a mate of Eno's there has been historical post punk revisionism to Make King Crimson the progenitors of Prog. They were alright - but a sideshow really.

  8. #83
    Passing by a quaint old pub, I heard a lilt. Hey! Hold on! Let’s go inside – I hear something. And there was the Pat Metheny group. And Lyle was there (RIP)! They were playing this lilt (San Lorenzo):
    Iluvatar, here is my Pat Metheny story, which I may have told before. Back in the mid-70s I was a student at Mich State U and I worked with a group called Showcase Jazz- we put on jazz concerts and I was "Director of Hospitality," which meant i filled the back room with food and beverages per artist request, took musicians out for dinner at times and picked them up at airports- so I got meet tons of musicians. We had the Gary Burton Quintet in, at the time they were playing Colors of Chloe- the band was Gary, Mick Goodrick on guitar, Bobby Moses on drums, Steve Swallow on bass (to this day the nicest musician I ever met) and Pat Metheny on guitar, and he was maybe 23 then. Swallow had let me play his bass, and Metheny was there and he sort of ripped the bass out of my hands and proceeded to play all kinds of scales on it, like to show me who was boss. That was my intro to Pat- him being a jerk. I have a former HS schoolmate- guy named Marc Silver, also a guitarist who wrote a few teaching manuals- who tells me Pat is a nice guy, but not that day in that place. This is off thread of course, but there it is.
    I'm not lazy. I just work so fast I'm always done.

  9. #84
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    Here's what I posted in the thread on 'Group and orchestras', more specifically as response to Udi (Koomran) concerning Days of Future Passed and why In the Court of the Crimson kind of appears to have culturally robbed the former's status of "first (UK) progressive".



    FWIW, I still consider Soft Machine Volume Two to be the first bonafide coherent and unified progressive rock record from Britain, with essentially all assets of the term highlighted. It was released one month before ItCotCK and Sea Shanties by High Tide, and as avant-garde or more than both.

    Days of Future Passed, Ars Longa Vita Brevis and Shine On Brightly certainly preceded it, but they weren't fully formed within a conceptual assessment of style or aesthetic as regards the term. These all informed the soon-to-be burgeoning "symphonic" rock movement, of course.

    As for Clouds, I always loved their two albums. They are great vintage UK progressive artifacts and highly listenable for melodic content, mood and (partly) performance. But they are not as historically unheralded as some claim; rather their reputation as originators of an extremely broad genre has been somewhat overblown, as I see it, being an historian and former music writer myself. "Waiter, There's Something In My Soup" from their debut (Scrapbook) definitely introduces the orchestral, narrative epic in British pop/rock, but this was summer 1969 and The Who had already done a pseudo-mini-pop/rock-opera ("A Quick One") long before this.

    As for the US, I still believe Pet Sounds or Absolutely Free would qualify. The Touch album is seminal and quite wonderful, but in all fairness that debut Sea Train record was actually tighter in composed density and was released in the same month as the Touch (January '69). I've found myself championing both, though.

    Bangin' post, Richard.
    I like the part where Icarus hijacks the Little Red Hen.

    http://www.discogs.com/user/moecurlythanu/collection

  10. #85
    Member Vic2012's Avatar
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    I'll make a case for The Electric Prunes. It's psych-pop-proto-proto- progressive-proto-metal. There's adventure and fuzzy, distorted guitars.

  11. #86
    ^ If you're thinking of Mass In F Minor, that's a glorious record.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  12. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    ^ If you're thinking of Mass In F Minor, that's a glorious record.
    I'm listening to the self-titled album from 1967. I will do search on YT for the album you mentioned..

  13. #88
    ^ The one with "I Had Too Much to Dream Last Night" as opener? Man, that's an exquisite garage-psych enterprise if there ever was one, but I really don't hear the immediate relevance.

    Underground, their second release, is very good as well.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  14. #89
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    ^ the album I was listening to had some baroque pop with strings and harpsichord. That's proggy enough.

  15. #90
    Roland kirk (FLUTE ala Jehtro/Focus in early 60's): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V7QI31ihgMI
    Or this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UJOk8G5w6Yg

    Jacques Loussier (ELP/NICE) type of music in 1963: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tls9wKscFEQ

    Lalo S.: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ulzMKpJmfJQ

    in 1737 Rebel wrote this revolutionary piece: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=efpG0Ut5STc
    Last edited by MIO Records; 1 Week Ago at 05:56 AM.

  16. #91
    Member Vic2012's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    ^ The one with "I Had Too Much to Dream Last Night" as opener? Man, that's an exquisite garage-psych enterprise if there ever was one, but I really don't hear the immediate relevance.

    Underground, their second release, is very good as well.
    I was kind of being sarcastic, but staying with the spirit of this thread. Psychedelia is part of the evolution of prog.

  17. #92
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    Scrotum Scissor View Post
    ^ If you're thinking of Mass In F Minor, that's a glorious record.
    Listening to it now. Two songs in. Wow. It's all sung in Latin. Amazing, the power of PE and YT. Never would have heard it let alone heard about it. It's progressive.

  18. #93
    Maybe we are missing the forest for the trees. Arthur Brown was doing prog in 1968 with Fire, right? Heavy organ, pyrotechnics, and flamboyant stage act? Prog!

    I'm not lazy. I just work so fast I'm always done.

  19. #94
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    ^ My brother had the album. When I heard ...." I am the god of hell fire.." I had to go to confession.....

  20. #95
    I'm here for the moosic NogbadTheBad's Avatar
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    Fantastic album
    Ian

    Gordon Haskell - "You've got to keep the groove in your head and play a load of bollocks instead"
    I blame Wynton, what was the question?
    There are only 10 types of people in the World, those who understand binary and those that don't.

  21. #96
    Quote Originally Posted by Dana5140 View Post
    Maybe we are missing the forest for the trees. Arthur Brown was doing prog in 1968 with Fire, right? Heavy organ, pyrotechnics, and flamboyant stage act? Prog!

    From the Illustrated Encyclopedia of Rock 1976: "A product of the U.K.'s psychedelic summer of 1967 - when he began working at London's UFO club with original Crazy World of Arthur Brown group, WHICH INCLUDED keyboardist VINCENT CRANE - later of ATOMIC ROOSTER (K Palmer also played)."He was a pioneer of 'shock rock'" Guy was good

    And the picture in the encyclopedia has him hanging on a cross! Go figure... "Had a small role in the Tommy movie in `75".

    Vincent was totally dangerous, yes? "Death Walks Behind You". And the like. I would hoist Arthur up there with Iron Butterfly. Gots me 3-4 of AR's albums (problem? not allowed to play `em - house has to be emptied - crap!)

    I will try to keep up w/ the forest instead of the dang trees, please attend...

  22. #97
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    Here's what I posted in the thread on 'Group and orchestras', more specifically as response to Udi (Koomran) concerning Days of Future Passed and why In the Court of the Crimson kind of appears to have culturally robbed the former's status of "first (UK) progressive".



    FWIW, I still consider Soft Machine Volume Two to be the first bonafide coherent and unified progressive rock record from Britain, with essentially all assets of the term highlighted. It was released one month before ItCotCK and Sea Shanties by High Tide, and as avant-garde or more than both.

    Days of Future Passed, Ars Longa Vita Brevis and Shine On Brightly certainly preceded it, but they weren't fully formed within a conceptual assessment of style or aesthetic as regards the term. These all informed the soon-to-be burgeoning "symphonic" rock movement, of course.

    As for Clouds, I always loved their two albums. They are great vintage UK progressive artifacts and highly listenable for melodic content, mood and (partly) performance. But they are not as historically unheralded as some claim; rather their reputation as originators of an extremely broad genre has been somewhat overblown, as I see it, being an historian and former music writer myself. "Waiter, There's Something In My Soup" from their debut (Scrapbook) definitely introduces the orchestral, narrative epic in British pop/rock, but this was summer 1969 and The Who had already done a pseudo-mini-pop/rock-opera ("A Quick One") long before this.

    As for the US, I still believe Pet Sounds or Absolutely Free would qualify. The Touch album is seminal and quite wonderful, but in all fairness that debut Sea Train record was actually tighter in composed density and was released in the same month as the Touch (January '69). I've found myself championing both, though.



    @ (SS) (I ain’t using your handle! It’s too dang gross – Dude@!)

    This is my bad totally. I am gonna blame age for this. It’s been about 15-20 years since I listened to Soft Machine – crap! My takeaway after my last listen was to file these guys in the Jazz section. I should not apologize for that however. Albums 4/5 were very Jazz centric (One might claim to hear Chic Corea’s album “Leprechaun” on Album #4!). That is the memory I came away with – TOTALLY forgetting the first 2 albums (really 3!). Holy cow – boy did I ever blow it! (In retrospect, I blew the 3rd album as well – BIG TIME!)


    That is the reason I was reticent mentioning Soft as one of the beginners of Prog. OK; I blew it. So, I decided to play my collection which is a paucity – only 5 albums – 1st 5.

    So, let’s see, Soft first eructed in `68 w/ # 2 eructing in `69. King Crimson eructed in `69/ (and, yes, Traffic was already up and running).

    Per your suggestion, I tried to play Album #2 first. Problem? I just swapped out my CD/DVD changer and accidentally put on Albums 4/5 (CD has both). Had to re-tool to get #2 on.

    Takeaways? Geeze louize! These guys aren’t just “Jazz” (not totally)! What was I thinking (too much Rush 2112 and Liquid Tension Experiment “3 Minute Warning” on the brain – bosh!)?

    So, I finally got Soft’s album #2 spun up. Track’s 10, 13, 14, & 17 are kickin’!

    “Out of Tunes”, “Fire Engine Passing…”, “Pig”, “Returns to the Bedroom”.

    But! As it turns out. Album #1 spanks as well: tracks: 1,2, 5, 6, and 9:
    “Hope for Happiness”, “Joy of a Toy”, “So Boot it All”, etc.

    Then the changer managed to move over to Album #3. (It is working as long as I give it the right instructions) And what did I hear? Release date – 1970 (in competition with King Crimson?????? – who was really first????????)

    Holy cow!!!! How could I forget this album???????????? I really, really, BLEW IT! Oh man!

    Let’s start off with the 1st 2 tracks:
    “Facelift” & “Slightly All the Time”

    Folks, I fell (literally) out of my chair! And I filed these puppies in the Jazz section???? What???? TOTAL BAD!!!.



    I think Focus & Soft were total killers in their time/space. Btw, there ain’t nothing “Soft” here.

    Gonna try and find it….
    Found it (oh btw, it sounds even better when it is played thru 4 Klipsch speakers – just saying…):
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WSv2gLT0jkU



    BTW: The Nice “continues” to disappoint me. I have 5 of their albums including “Ars”. Mebbe it’s time for a re-listen? What say you Gandalf?
    BTW: Album 3 (Soft Machine), imho, is when they opened the throttles WIDE OPEN.


    Peace…



    I am so ashamed…

    P.S. Did you know that Pink Floyyd consulted with the Beach Boys about “Pet Sounds” before they released “Animals”? America ain’t all bad.

  23. #98
    Well ahem, lemme `xplain.

    The 3rd album by Soft Machine has a track on there called “Face Lift”. The translational musical passages sound nothing OTHER THAN King Crimson’s “…Court of…”. I heard about Led Zep being taken to court by Spirit over the beginning of one of their songs. I NEVER heard of KC taking Soft to court over “Face Lift” for plagiarism. Go figure??? But Soft was anything but soft. I am still gonna file them in the Jazz section though – they had hallmarks of Prog, but the majority of their effort was a credit to Jazz Fusion (indeed, I think they helped Miles, Coltrane, and Thelonius Monk create the genre of Jazz Fusion). But that’s me…

    I would like to thank the erudite, and eclectic folks who posted their wisdom for their acute acumen. I took very copious notes. The books I have surveyed amplified your posts – Psych was a major underpinning of Prog Rock. I would only suggest that classical music also played a role – but that’s me (i.e. Ravel).

    I think that perhaps this ties up this short thread!

    I would like to leave you all with three songs. Here’s the deal. I can listen to the first 2 songs for a thousand times w/o ever getting tired of them. The 2nd song is hard to research – Tangerine Dream has published 105+ albums. Just so you know? No one mentioned them at all!

    “A Passion Play” was Tull’s contribution to Prog. I never tire from this due to my love for the Celtic “River Song” (not different from Gentle Giant!). That puppy has been in my car now for about 3 years – I never tire from listening to it.

    Let’s take a break, kick our feet up, crack a beer & stop arguing about genres, and get real greasy:

    Before, that? Let me say thank-you! You guys kick some major boot!










    (And the devil cries MORE!)

  24. #99
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
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    8,658
    This is why we're here, brother.
    I like the part where Icarus hijacks the Little Red Hen.

    http://www.discogs.com/user/moecurlythanu/collection

  25. #100
    Member Zeuhlmate's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Copenhagen, Denmark
    Posts
    5,379
    How about Moondog, he was pretty early

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moondog#Discography

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