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Thread: Music books

  1. #1
    Member hippypants's Avatar
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    Music books

    Do you have a book on music that you return to often for reference, photos, history, criticism, reviews, etc.? I used to used those Rolling Stone books about music for a while, though by now they are fairly outdated.

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    Rock: The Primary Text by Allan F. Moore is the book that I've returned to the most often over the last 15 years for ideas on music appreciation. I even got the expanded third edition co-authored with Remy Martin, even though much of the new material is recycled from Moore's other books and essays (e.g. the chapter on "new" progressive rock expands upon Moore's contribution to Lücke and Näumann's Reflexionen zum Progressive Rock).

    In terms of reviews, I still find myself returning to Dag Erik Asbjørnsen to look for more obscure releases. Actually getting to hear them is now so much easier than when I first got the book. I suppose John Schafer's New Sounds was a similar treasure trove (and a more enjoyable read) for a long time in the 1990s.

    Of band biographies, I probably know the first edition of Nicholas Schaffner's Saucerful of Secrets by heart by now, as it was among the first of its kind that I got (and still among the best). I even bought the Finnish translation of the amended 2005 edition (Pink Floydin odysseia, 2006). Oh, and speaking of Finnish music books, Jee Jee Jee (1998), a history of Finnish rock music up to the late 1990s, seems to be an inexhaustable supply of well-researched musical history and amusing anecdotes written in a very absorbing style. That has been re-read several times.

    There are other music books (sheet music included) that I return to for ideas, reference or just entertainment, but those are the most well-thumbed copies I have.
    Last edited by Kai; 2 Weeks Ago at 09:35 AM.

  3. #3
    Well, you can say internet changed a lot.
    I used Terry Hounsome's New Rock Record as one of my main information-books on musicians and bands: on which albums did they play, which albums were released.
    You could say Discogs is the digital version of New Rock Record.

    To satisfy my album-cover love I now and then return to my library on that subject (I guess I have about 200 titles).

    Now and then I look into one of the editions of Muziekkrant OOR's Eerste Nederlandse Pop Encyclopedie (I've got 15 editions), especially when I have to review a re-release of an older band.

    Well, and then I occassionally look into one of the many (auto)biographies, books on prog, jazz(rock), minimal-music, alternative rock, etc. when a subject comes up in one of the many posts over here

  4. #4
    I have several books I often return to, find find something about a certain group, but those are in German.
    Another book I like to look into is The art of electronic music - A Keyboard book.

  5. #5
    I havemore books and guides than I can count. This pic is about half of them.
    1936828_1196043617345_7030955_n_1196043617345.jpg
    I'm not lazy. I just work so fast I'm always done.

  6. #6
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
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    I got dozens of music books read, but very few have been re-read a second or third time, for lack of time or need to revisit. However, this doesn't mean that I won't reopen them to check out for an info that needs refreshing.

    I've also got a small pile of books that are in progress of reading (including 4 Le Mot Et Le Reste - an excellent publishing house where Aymeric is), plus a bigger pile of books that I hope to one day start reading.


    Quote Originally Posted by Kai View Post
    In terms of reviews, I still find myself returning to Dag Erik Asbjørnsen to look for more obscure releases. Actually getting to hear them is now so much easier than when I first got the book. I suppose John Schafer's New Sounds was a similar treasure trove (and a more enjoyable read) for a long time in the 1990s.
    Clearly the Borderline books from Asbjornssen and Joynson are my most frequent go to books. They've conveniently replaced my Colin Larkin's Who's Who in XYZ style, which were my reference books in the 90's. Pete Frame's Rock Family Tree is another clear winner.

    I really wish Abjornssen wrote more books because not only do I like his style, but I often agree witrh his reviews (much less so for Joynson's books)
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from drug-addicts to complete nutcases.

  7. #7
    Member hippypants's Avatar
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    I was going to mention Audion magazine, but life got in the way. Anyway, I never read the magazine when it was being published, but you can get back issues over at Bandcamp, along with a download for a comp CD of various groups. They give you the e-Audion magazine with the comp as well. I order two the other day, and probably will get more a little later.

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