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Thread: The most repugnant villain role in film

  1. #76
    Member nosebone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ronmac View Post
    I didn't go through this list, but I would say the killer in the original Dirty Harry.
    Great choice!

    Andy Robinson as Scorpio.

    No motive, just pure evil!
    no tunes, no dynamics, no nosebone

  2. #77
    Quote Originally Posted by mozo-pg View Post
    For David Lynch, if it hasn't been mentioned, Frank from Blue Velvet - mommy mommy!
    Post #61 above...
    And if there were a god, I think it very unlikely that he would have such an uneasy vanity as to be offended by those who doubt His existence - Russell

  3. #78
    James Cromwell as Captain Dudley Smith in LA Confidential was pretty despicable.

    Willing to corrupt the police department, send out his police henchman to torture suspects, kill anyone who gets in his way (including fellow officers).

    Not to mention, it is the best performance in a movie loaded with great performances.


    And if there were a god, I think it very unlikely that he would have such an uneasy vanity as to be offended by those who doubt His existence - Russell

  4. #79
    Member Jerjo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by simon moon View Post
    James Cromwell as Captain Dudley Smith in LA Confidential was pretty despicable.

    Willing to corrupt the police department, send out his police henchman to torture suspects, kill anyone who gets in his way (including fellow officers).

    Not to mention, it is the best performance in a movie loaded with great performances.


    I forgot about that one - yes, truly an evil mofo. That "have you a valediction" scene was great. Then again, the movie was packed with great scenes.
    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  5. #80
    Tim Curry in Legend was pretty damn repugnant.
    https://images.app.goo.gl/kEqmCC2tuiLYcyhL9

  6. #81
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    Dolores Umbridge.
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  7. #82
    ^^^ Oooh, good one, though she's nowhere near as repugnant in the movies as in the book. (A close friend of mine - dead now, alas! - looked almost exactly like the pictures in the [US] books.)

    For truly repugnant, there's the creature in the low-budget Monsturd.
    Maka ki ecela tehani yanke lo!

  8. #83
    Nurse Ratched from One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest.

    Jack did get back at her, though.
    "A conspiracy of silence speaks louder than words."

    - Dr. Winston O'Boogie

  9. #84
    A less obvious one perhaps, but the character of the train company COO, Yon Suk (played by Korean actor Eui Sung Kim) in Train To Busan.

    Anyone who has seen the movie will understand...never have you wanted to see a character get his just desserts before the movie ends so badly.

    And like a lot of the best 'villains', you can sometimes understand and sympathise with the reasons for some of his actions.

    Great movie by the way, highly recommended.
    I only clicked on it because I thought it was going to be something more interesting...

  10. #85
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    I have been going back and watching the HBO series OZ from back in the 90's. The character of Vernon Shillinger (played by J.K. Simmons) is a pretty nasty villain.

  11. #86
    Man of repute progmatist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ronmac View Post
    Nurse Ratched from One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest.

    Jack did get back at her, though.
    His victory was short lived though. She survived while he got lobotomized.
    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"--Dalai Lama

  12. #87
    Member since March 2004 mozo-pg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by progmatist View Post
    His victory was short lived though. She survived while he got lobotomized.
    Doh!!!! Spoiler Alert.
    What can this strange device be? When I touch it, it brings forth a sound.

  13. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by mozo-pg View Post
    Doh!!!! Spoiler Alert.
    I didn't give the complete ending........what comes after the lobotomy.
    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"--Dalai Lama

  14. #89
    Banned Dave (in MA)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mozo-pg View Post
    Doh!!!! Spoiler Alert.
    Is it still necessary to give spoiler alerts for movies made 45 years ago?

  15. #90
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    It may have already been mentioned - in fact it must have - but Robert DeNiro as Max Cady in "Cape Fear" is right up there. The reason I say this must have been mentioned before is due to Robert Mitchum's performance in "Night of the Hunter." (Wikipedia's entry says the original is also called Cape Fear, but it IS "Night of the Hunter," right?). Anyway, I've actually never really seen all of "Night of the Hunter," but my mom loved it and was always telling me to watch it.

    I fucking LOVE the part in "Cape Fear" when DeNiro gets out of prison and goes to the movie theater, and he laughs insanely while smoking that huge cigar, blowing smoke in the air. You get the sense that the movie he's watching isn't anywhere near funny enough to elicit his laughter, but he's just celebrating his release from prison, and laughing at a movie and smoking a huge cigar is something he longed to do. Plus, he's thinking about all the crazy shit he's ABOUT to do. Just great.

    I actually rewatched "Cape Fear" recently, and in a certain sense it didn't hold up, because I think I've become a bit jaded, and the climax of the movie wasn't quite as extreme as I remembered it to be. But the tension as Nick Nolte and Jessica Lange are trying to prepare for Cady to show up at their house, is still there and effective.

  16. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by JKL2000 View Post
    It may have already been mentioned - in fact it must have - but Robert DeNiro as Max Cady in "Cape Fear" is right up there. The reason I say this must have been mentioned before is due to Robert Mitchum's performance in "Night of the Hunter." (Wikipedia's entry says the original is also called Cape Fear, but it IS "Night of the Hunter," right?). Anyway, I've actually never really seen all of "Night of the Hunter," but my mom loved it and was always telling me to watch it.

    I fucking LOVE the part in "Cape Fear" when DeNiro gets out of prison and goes to the movie theater, and he laughs insanely while smoking that huge cigar, blowing smoke in the air. You get the sense that the movie he's watching isn't anywhere near funny enough to elicit his laughter, but he's just celebrating his release from prison, and laughing at a movie and smoking a huge cigar is something he longed to do. Plus, he's thinking about all the crazy shit he's ABOUT to do. Just great.

    I actually rewatched "Cape Fear" recently, and in a certain sense it didn't hold up, because I think I've become a bit jaded, and the climax of the movie wasn't quite as extreme as I remembered it to be. But the tension as Nick Nolte and Jessica Lange are trying to prepare for Cady to show up at their house, is still there and effective.
    Cady definitely ranks right up there. That film got mixed reviews, but I thought DeNiro was amazing in it.

  17. #92
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    That "speaking in tongues" bit as the bible quoting Cady is one of the most bizarre and frightening things I have ever witnessed in a movie. Just incredibly effective and all consuming as the pinnacle of fear and loathing.

    “With the power vested in me by the kingdom of God, I sentence you to the Ninth Circle of Hell! Now you will learn about loss! Loss of freedom! Loss of humanity! Now you and I will truly be the same.”

  18. #93
    I guess I should re-watch Cape Fear. Don't know why but DeNiro didn't strike me as awful as he should have been, except the creepy scene with Lewis.

    Now I remember why I searched out this thread. Found a good villain in Alice in Batwoman.

    Crikey, I'm bad at this villain game but she's good. The joker and such are too obvious to fit with the theme of the thread.
    Carry On My Blood-Ejaculating Son - JKL2000

  19. #94
    I always consider the first scene with Hannibal Lector in Silence to be one of the great introductions of an evil character, especially after Clarice Starling has to pass all the other psychopaths, all of whom act like psychopaths. And then there is Lector, seemingly quiet and centered and focused. I also think Captain Vidal is a great and evil villain as others have noted in Pan's Labyrinth. Anton Chigurh is another.

    But my vote goes to Asami Yamazaki, in Audition. If you've seen it, you know why. If you have not, be warned.
    I'm not lazy. I just work so fast I'm always done.

  20. #95
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    I always consider the first scene with Hannibal Lector in Silence to be one of the great introductions of an evil character, especially after Clarice Starling has to pass all the other psychopaths, all of whom act like psychopaths
    Allow me one pedantic moment. The others were likely sociopaths, who tend to run a bit hot and impulsive. A true psychopath (and they're far less common) is like Lector. The engine runs cool and calm with absolute no regard for anyone or anything. Those are the ones that are the most dangerous. I saw a psychiatrist on TV several years ago that said until the mid-80s, he didn't think a true psychopath existed. And then he interviewed Ted Bundy.
    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  21. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerjo View Post
    Allow me one pedantic moment. The others were likely sociopaths, who tend to run a bit hot and impulsive. A true psychopath (and they're far less common) is like Lector. The engine runs cool and calm with absolute no regard for anyone or anything. Those are the ones that are the most dangerous. I saw a psychiatrist on TV several years ago that said until the mid-80s, he didn't think a true psychopath existed. And then he interviewed Ted Bundy.
    Have you ever seen the series “Mindhunter” on Netflix? It is about two guys who pretty much developed psychological profiling of psychopaths / sociopaths in the 1970’s. It is an exceptionally good show, which uses real criminals and is based on a book one of the guys wrote. It is well worth checking out if you are interested in that kind of thing.

  22. #97
    Member nosebone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveSly View Post
    Have you ever seen the series “Mindhunter” on Netflix? It is about two guys who pretty much developed psychological profiling of psychopaths / sociopaths in the 1970’s. It is an exceptionally good show, which uses real criminals and is based on a book one of the guys wrote. It is well worth checking out if you are interested in that kind of thing.
    Great show and pretty accurate regarding real serial cases ; Kemper, Berkowitz, Wayne Williams etc.

    The screenplay from John E. Douglas' book Mindhunter: Inside the FBI's Elite Serial Crime Unit (1995) became the show.

    Great book btw
    no tunes, no dynamics, no nosebone

  23. #98
    Man of repute progmatist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerjo View Post
    Allow me one pedantic moment. The others were likely sociopaths, who tend to run a bit hot and impulsive. A true psychopath (and they're far less common) is like Lector. The engine runs cool and calm with absolute no regard for anyone or anything. Those are the ones that are the most dangerous. I saw a psychiatrist on TV several years ago that said until the mid-80s, he didn't think a true psychopath existed. And then he interviewed Ted Bundy.
    There is but one true difference between a psychopath and a sociopath: the psychopath doesn't know the difference between right and wrong. The sociopath knows, but doesn't care.

    Ironically, only a psychopath can meet the legal definition of "insane" in a criminal proceeding. Psychiatric disorders like schizophrenia and bi-polar disorder rarely do. Yet, a psychopath will gain zero benefit from the treatment prescribed by law, after being found not guilty by reason of insanity.
    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"--Dalai Lama

  24. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by nosebone View Post
    Great show and pretty accurate regarding real serial cases ; Kemper, Berkowitz, Wayne Williams etc.

    The screenplay from John E. Douglas' book Mindhunter: Inside the FBI's Elite Serial Crime Unit (1995) became the show.

    Great book btw
    I have the book loaded into my Kindle, but have not had the chance to read it yet. Too bad it looks like there will not be a 3rd season. I thought the show took a while to grow on me, but ended up really enjoying it, especially the 2nd season.

  25. #100
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerjo View Post
    Allow me one pedantic moment. The others were likely sociopaths, who tend to run a bit hot and impulsive. A true psychopath (and they're far less common) is like Lector. The engine runs cool and calm with absolute no regard for anyone or anything. Those are the ones that are the most dangerous. I saw a psychiatrist on TV several years ago that said until the mid-80s, he didn't think a true psychopath existed. And then he interviewed Ted Bundy.
    In an interview I read with a crime writer or reporter, can't remember which, he said that this concept of urbane cultured serial killers like Lector was a load of rubbish; I think he pointed to Jeffrey Dahmer as a more typical example, someone with absolutely no redeeming qualities whatsoever.

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