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Thread: The most repugnant villain role in film

  1. #51
    Member Jerjo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by markwoll View Post
    Keyser Söze ? Low hanging fruit.
    Weyland-Yutani Corporation
    Nothing says repugnant than a malicious corporation. Good call.

    I like Brick Top (Alan Ford) in the film Snatch. Now there was a nasty piece of work without a single redeeming quality. But Captain Vidal in Pan's Labyrinth was probably the villain that I wanted to die the most while watching a movie - utterly despicable.
    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  2. #52
    A bit less obvious and low key perhaps, but I would also cite Robert Prosky's crime boss in Michael Mann's Thief.

    At first he comes across as quite affable, almost a kind of kindly grandfather figure.

    But when the stakes are raised he shows his true colours. The scene where he delivers his speech to James Caan's character is one of the most powerful and devastating i have ever heard.

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by nosebone View Post
    Good one!

    John Glover as sleazy psychopath Alan Raimy in Elmore Leonard's Fifty Two Pick-up ( 1986), also starring Roy Scheider and Ann Margaret.
    You beat me to it. This one was one of the best. There was a great, very subtle scene where he, who is a very gifted accountant in addition to being a sleazy porn theater owner, looks over Roy Scheider's ledger's and comments on his financial decisions.
    Brian Dennehy: "I'm now 80 and I'm just another actor and that's fine with me. I've had a hell of a ride," ... "I have a nice house. I haven't got a palace, a mansion, but a pretty nice, comfortable home. I've raised a bunch of kids and sent them all to school, and they're all doing well. All the people that are close to me are reasonably healthy and happy. Listen, that's as much as anybody can hope for in life."

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Painter View Post
    You beat me to it. This one was one of the best. There was a great, very subtle scene where he, who is a very gifted accountant in addition to being a sleazy porn theater owner, looks over Roy Scheider's ledger's and comments on his financial decisions.
    That's the scene.....sport!
    no tunes, no dynamics, no nosebone

  5. #55
    Quote Originally Posted by nosebone View Post
    That's the scene.....sport!
    I would also add Clarence Williams 3rd's Bobby Shy from the same film. He had a way of barely whispering his dialogue but yet still imbuing it with menace.

    Reminded me a little of Bill Duke in American Gigolo. There was a scene where Richard Green goes to Dukes apartment near the end, and Duke reveals that he basically framed him for a series of murders.

    And Dukes dialogue gets softer and softer, but yet more dramatic...

    "Why you? Because you...you were frameable Julian...you stepped on too many toes...nobody liked you...I never liked you much myself...now...get oooooooouuuuuutttttt".

  6. #56
    The gang who kidnap Jesse in Breaking Bad, especially Todd.

  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Halmyre View Post
    The gang who kidnap Jesse in Breaking Bad, especially Todd.
    Todd is a good one. Creepy as hell in a very different way. I think he may have been even more creepy in the El Camino Breaking Bad movie where you got to see him at home too.

  8. #58
    None more than Damien in the Omen trilogy. I mean, he's the Antichrist, can't get more evil than that.

  9. #59
    Quote Originally Posted by SteveSly View Post
    Todd is a good one. Creepy as hell in a very different way. I think he may have been even more creepy in the El Camino Breaking Bad movie where you got to see him at home too.
    Oh yeah, he was creepy in that. A true sociopath.

  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rogue Mail View Post
    I would also add Clarence Williams 3rd's Bobby Shy from the same film. He had a way of barely whispering his dialogue but yet still imbuing it with menace.
    The scene where he's suffocating Vanity in her bed with that teddy bear! Holy shit!
    no tunes, no dynamics, no nosebone

  11. #61
    What?!

    No love (or should I say, hate), for Dennis Hopper as Frank Booth from Blue Velvet?

  12. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by simon moon View Post
    What?!

    No love (or should I say, hate), for Dennis Hopper as Frank Booth from Blue Velvet?
    Good choice. David Lynch has produced some great villians. There was also Bob in Twin Peaks, who still scares the life out of me. Then there was Leland Palmer (in truth, the real baddie in Twin Peaks)
    'There are no certain answers and no time to understand / The goal's a changing paradise, a moment out of date'

  13. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rogue Mail View Post
    I would also add Clarence Williams 3rd's Bobby Shy from the same film. He had a way of barely whispering his dialogue but yet still imbuing it with menace
    Absolutely. He was a close second. Very menacing
    Brian Dennehy: "I'm now 80 and I'm just another actor and that's fine with me. I've had a hell of a ride," ... "I have a nice house. I haven't got a palace, a mansion, but a pretty nice, comfortable home. I've raised a bunch of kids and sent them all to school, and they're all doing well. All the people that are close to me are reasonably healthy and happy. Listen, that's as much as anybody can hope for in life."

  14. #64
    Quote Originally Posted by simon moon View Post
    What?!

    No love (or should I say, hate), for Dennis Hopper as Frank Booth from Blue Velvet?
    Dean Stockwell's character was hardly a boy scout either.

  15. #65
    Quote Originally Posted by aith01 View Post
    Oh yeah, he was creepy in that. A true sociopath.
    I was really just stumping for an answer last night and couldn't come up with anything then went lollygagging around with definitions but damn, Todd is so creepy. There'd probably be a really good short one or two season story about how he came to be. Got to be some horrific stuff in his past

    ETA: If I were writing a slasher flick I'd go with that ultra creepy Burger King mask. That's worse than any hockey mask, pigs head or pieces of leather you want to cover your face with.
    Last edited by TheLoony; 2 Weeks Ago at 01:57 AM.
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  16. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sturgeon's Lawyer View Post
    Another one nobody's brought up: Mr. Potter from It's a Wonderful Life. He makes Mitch McConnell look like a warm, giving human being.
    Watching It's a Wonderful Life this year, it was difficult to separate the two.
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  17. #67
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    I liked the SNL skit from the 80s where the missing ending to It's a Wonderful Life was found and it was basically everyone in town tracking down Potter and taking turns beating the living shit out of him.
    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  18. #68
    I didn't go through this list, but I would say the killer in the original Dirty Harry.
    "A conspiracy of silence speaks louder than words."

    - Dr. Winston O'Boogie

  19. #69
    Quote Originally Posted by Munster View Post
    Good choice. David Lynch has produced some great villians. There was also Bob in Twin Peaks, who still scares the life out of me. Then there was Leland Palmer (in truth, the real baddie in Twin Peaks)
    Maybe I’m misremembering but weren’t Bob and Leland the same character, Bob was just Laura’s projection to mask the true horror of her situation.

  20. #70
    Member since March 2004 mozo-pg's Avatar
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    For David Lynch, if it hasn't been mentioned, Frank from Blue Velvet - mommy mommy!
    What can this strange device be? When I touch it, it brings forth a sound.

  21. #71
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    definitely a toss up between Superman in any of his films and Tony Manero in Saturday Night horror

    eeeeeeevilllll fictional characters polluting movie houses
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from drug-addicts to complete nutcases.

  22. #72
    Quote Originally Posted by Sunlight Caller View Post
    Maybe I’m misremembering but weren’t Bob and Leland the same character, Bob was just Laura’s projection to mask the true horror of her situation.
    Bob possessed Leland, just like he did to Cooper.

    I forgot about Bob. My daughter gets wigged out from him. But, no character wigs her out more than the girl in the radiator from "Eraserhead." (Not a villain, though.)
    "A conspiracy of silence speaks louder than words."

    - Dr. Winston O'Boogie

  23. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sunlight Caller View Post
    Maybe I’m misremembering but weren’t Bob and Leland the same character, Bob was just Laura’s projection to mask the true horror of her situation.

    Quote Originally Posted by ronmac View Post
    Bob possessed Leland, just like he did to Cooper.

    I forgot about Bob. My daughter gets wigged out from him. But, no character wigs her out more than the girl in the radiator from "Eraserhead." (Not a villain, though.)
    I had forgotten all this. According to Wikipedia, Bob was 'an interdimensional entity who feeds on pain and sorrow. An inhabiting spirit, he possesses human beings and then commits acts of rape and murder in order to feast upon his victims'. And I thought he was just a plain old-fashioned villain.
    Last edited by Munster; 1 Week Ago at 06:29 AM.
    'There are no certain answers and no time to understand / The goal's a changing paradise, a moment out of date'

  24. #74
    Quote Originally Posted by Munster View Post
    I had forgotten all this. According to Wikipedia, Bob was 'an interdimensional entity who feeds on pain and sorrow. An inhabiting spirit, he possesses human beings and then commits acts of rape and murder in order to feast upon his victims'. And I thought he was just a plain old-fashioned villain.
    I did rewatch the whole series just before the third series aired a few years ago, but it runs down so many tangents that it’s easy to get confused and forget things! That’s my excuse, but as much as I love David Lynch’s work, there are times I feel he is making it up as he goes along. In addition there were whole chunks that were written and directed by others, so the vision went elsewhere. In fact Lynch fell out with the studio for a time and left the series, only coming back at the end to bring it all together (sort of). Now that you have jogged my memory Bob came from the Black Lodge, which was represented as the zig zag floored room that Cooper and Laura ended up in. He was the worst of many evil spirits from that plain. I recall reading that the actor that played Bob was working as a set technician, and Lynch saw him, liked his offbeat look and created this role for him.

  25. #75
    I didn't watch enough of Twin Peaks when it originally aired, so I was pretty lost. Then, after the reboot, I bought the entire series and watched it with my wife and daughter. Then we bought the movie and then the Showtime series and watched those. The only issue is that there were so many things that never got straightened out in the end.

    Then I got the Mark Frost book that covers the back story. It's very cool and does answer some questions.
    "A conspiracy of silence speaks louder than words."

    - Dr. Winston O'Boogie

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