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Thread: The most repugnant villain role in film

  1. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by Sturgeon's Lawyer View Post
    I'll go for a villain who is repugnant partly because neither he nor most audients actually realize that he is the villain: Dr. Henry Frankenstein, as portrayed by Colin Clive.
    A portrayal that is true to the novel in that respect.
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  2. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave (in MA) View Post
    Hah! Ninja-ed in the second post - didn't click on your link until after I’d posted.

    That little smile before he pulls the trigger - hits me every time.
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  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    Without question Max Cady in Cape Fear.
    Robert Mitchum or Robert Dinero?


    The prison warden in Escape From Alcatraz. Patrick McGoohan was a great villain in anything in which he portrayed one.

  4. #29
    There's also Rutger Hauer's character John Ryder in 'The Hitcher' from 1986, a motif which for all the ludicrous reasons became a token of scrutiny as to post-modernist interpretations of homophobia during the 80s AIDS-scare. An omen of what was unfortunately to come in so-called "cultural sciences" 25+ years later, I gather.

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  5. #30
    Sheriff Little Bill Daggett (Gene Hackman) in Unforgiven is worth a mention here.
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  6. #31
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    Alex in A Clockwork Orange

    Hannibal Lecter in Hannibal

    Otis B. Driftwood from House Of 1000 Corpses and The Devil's Rejects

    Sadism.
    He did not know that the sword he'd hold, would turn his priceless empire into fool's gold...

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  7. #32
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    Darling sweet Patty McCormack in, The Bad Seed.
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  8. #33
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  9. #34
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    The Bond movie, Spectre, was just on TV now.
    I don't know if the arch villain Blofeld was portrayed as being mad in the orig. Fleming book, but in this movie he is played STRAIGHT LEVEL-HEADED/UNMELODRAMATIC by actor, Christoph Waltz.

    This got me thinking:
    should not a SANE-evil character be more evil than a mad one? Simply because the mad one doesn't really know what evil he is capable of.

    That would make Hannibal or, say, Robert Mitchum in Night of The Hunter or Vincent Price (in Witchfinder General, Pit & The Pendulum) less evil than ,say, Neeson as Ra (Batman Returns.)

    Im just reading Origion by Dan Brown. The character , Admiral Aliva, believes he has a duty to protect the ideals of Catholicism. He is certainly not portrayed as being mad or a fanatic. Does this make him less evil?

  10. #35
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    Gary Poulter in Joe (2013)

    A homeless man cast as an alcoholic father to Tye Sheridan who died shortly after filming.

    An authentic chilling performance that still gives me nightmares.
    Last edited by nosebone; 01-01-2021 at 04:11 AM.
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  11. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by aith01 View Post
    Hmm... My first thought was Captain Vidal, from Pan's Labyrinth. A thoroughly despicable human being; some of his scenes were difficult to watch.

    There have been some great choices listed already in this thread though.
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    Within the narrative logic of that film as parable, his character is intended as a paradigmatic conjunction of cultural history in modern Spain. I won't go further into it.

    Needless to say, one of the truly fantastic movies created during the last 20 years in Europe. I'll never forget attending cinema to see that tale come alive.
    Oh christ, I totally forgot about Vidal. Yes...horrifying. And yes, Pan's Labyrinth is a stunning achievement.
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  12. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by battema View Post
    Oh christ, I totally forgot about Vidal. Yes...horrifying. And yes, Pan's Labyrinth is a stunning achievement.
    It is one of those movies I can still remember.

    Great work on the pale man.

  13. #38
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    Gregory Peck (in a somewhat understated but quite effective role) as Dr. Josef Mengele in "The Boys From Brazil".

    Honorable mention to the rascally Dobermans.

  14. #39
    Another one nobody's brought up: Mr. Potter from It's a Wonderful Life. He makes Mitch McConnell look like a warm, giving human being.
    Maka ki ecela tehani yanke lo!

  15. #40
    Robert Prosky's mob boss in Thief. Telling James Caan how it's going to be.


  16. #41
    ^ While Peck was always an excellent performance and the source material of 'Boys from Brazil' outstanding (kudos Jed/KJL2000, son of the great Ira Levin!), I really think this is one of those cases where a remake would actually do some sense. Preferably a high-budget miniseries of some sort.

    Peck, at the top of his admittedly fabulous career-game, deliberately sought the role in order to reboot the sticky image of him as an eternal "good man" in the movies, while King Laurence Olivier actively needed to get the Szell/Weisse Engel/"Is It Safe?" association out of his Hollywood trajectory. Consequently the film passes as such, but today it comes across as somewhat dated and charicatured in spirit, I think. The scene with Olivier meeting the evolutionary biologist (played by Bruno Ganz) in Zürich is almost priceless in atmosphere, but James Mason's capacities are thrown away other than as direct dynamic to the sometimes intrinsically amusing tantrums of Peck's ecstatic Mengele.




    Yet speaking of films based on Ira Levin's work, Cassavetes' channelling of the core-treason of Guy Woodhouse in 'Rosemary's Baby' surely deserves a significant mention. Also one of the most grotesquely funny and frustrating (!) horrors of all time. The film itself is probably among the most perfectionist deliveries of detailed-oriented narrative I ever saw. You'll discover anew on each viewing of this.
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  17. #42
    Member nosebone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Halmyre View Post
    Robert Prosky's mob boss in Thief. Telling James Caan how it's going to be.
    Good one!

    John Glover as sleazy psychopath Alan Raimy in Elmore Leonard's Fifty Two Pick-up ( 1986), also starring Roy Scheider and Ann Margaret.
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  18. #43
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    Michael Rooker as the title character in Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer.

  19. #44
    ^ Rooker is one of those guys, along with the marvellous Michael Wincott, for instance - who instantly invokes a sense of disturbance and/or at times even impending dread in a viewer.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  20. #45
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    Baron Vladimir Harkonnen--from the Lynch film, I haven't seen the new one yet.

  21. #46
    Quote Originally Posted by SunRunner2 View Post
    Gregory Peck (in a somewhat understated but quite effective role) as Dr. Josef Mengele in "The Boys From Brazil".

    Honorable mention to the rascally Dobermans.
    Well, if you want to bring dogs into the equation then the Bumpus' dogs in A Christmas Story are due their acknowledgement. Not sure if they are evil. Mischievious?

    Cujo gets a good nod and a wink to a blind bat.

    Chris Cooper in The Muppets?

    I'm probably not getting this right.

    Ralph Macchio in The Karate Kid? According to How I Met Your Mother he's the villain and I hate to correct correctness.

    And why is it villain instead of villian? That's like some foreign language, vil-LAIN!

    I hope at some point this stream of consciousness was viewed as parody or satire (what's the dif?). If you took me seriously, well, that's on you.

    So thought I'd throw some crap in here to make this post worthwhile.

    Definition of villain
    1: a character in a story or play who opposes the hero
    2: a deliberate scoundrel or criminal
    3: one blamed for a particular evil or difficulty
    automation as the villain in job … displacement
    — M. H. Goldberg
    4: VILLEIN
    5: an uncouth person : BOOR
    Synonyms
    Ok, first off.....WTF is 4: VILLEIN?

    Yeah, found this at Merriam Webster, don't know how trustworthy they are.

    5: an uncouth person : BOOR

    I'm uncouth and boorish. But I'm not a villain.

    2: a deliberate scoundrel or criminal

    Define scoundrel.

    3: one blamed for a particular evil

    Yeah, been there, done that but am I a villain?
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  22. #47
    Banned Dave (in MA)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mascodagama View Post
    Frank (Henry Fonda) in Once Upon A Time In The West is up there when it comes to inspiring visceral loathing.
    He was my post #2.

  23. #48
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    Although he was not the main villian-----Dwight Frye as Renfield in Dracula===" Flies? Who wants flies when I've got nice juicy spiders"

  24. #49
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    Well, regardless of the 'loony' definitions for villain offered above, I submit Michael Ironside as Darryl Revok in the David Cronenberg classic "Scanners". I mean, when you can literally say that a villain was so egregiously vile that his portrayal made your head explode, you have nailed it right on the head. (Also, check out the actual relationship with this movie's plot about the drug ephemerol, which mirrors the real-life thalidomide scandal, in which the popular West German drug thalidomide caused severe birth defects in pregnant women prescribed the drug for morning sickness in Western Europe and Canada.) That's right, the counterculture is rising up in the form of scanners.

    Scanners_head_explode.jpg

  25. #50
    Quote Originally Posted by SunRunner2 View Post
    Gregory Peck (in a somewhat understated but quite effective role) as Dr. Josef Mengele in "The Boys From Brazil".
    Along that train of thought, Sir Laurence Olivier in Marathon Man. The dentist chair scene where Olivier kept repeating "Is it safe?" while digging a dental probe into Dustin Hoffman's cavity still gives me the creeps.
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