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Thread: What album took the biggest leap as far as prog as you knew it?

  1. #76
    Biota's Object Holder.

    Henry
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  2. #77
    Member IMWeasel's Avatar
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    Sleepytime Gorilla Museum's first album seemed to bridge a gap of sorts to me, this wasnt Yes or Genesis but something totally different but very fresh
    Eagles may soar, but weasels don't get sucked into jet engines.

  3. #78
    Member IMWeasel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lebofsky View Post
    Albums that blew my mind and added new unforeseen dimensions to my whole "prog" landscape.

    Slint "Spiderland"
    Massacre "Killing Time"
    Mr. Bungle S/T
    Monks of Doom "Soundtrack to the Film 'Breakfast on the Beach of Deception'"

    - Matt
    you know its awful b/c I love CVB and Monks of Doom, even friends with the band members on facebook, but still never heard the first two Monks of Doom albums all the way through. I know a few of the tracks from live shows and stuff at least. Need to fix that with ebay I guess.
    Eagles may soar, but weasels don't get sucked into jet engines.

  4. #79
    Quote Originally Posted by Lebofsky View Post
    Slint "Spiderland"
    Massacre "Killing Time"
    These would sound 100% contemporary even if released today.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  5. #80
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    I was going to say "Discipline" too, but I now remember that I had an epiphany before with Robert Fripp "Exposure" (and I'm not a fan of the 70s KC at all...)

  6. #81
    Quote Originally Posted by per anporth View Post
    I bought Vital, hoping for/expecting more Theme 1 - that was a pretty harsh awakening.
    When I was in college, a friend kept trying to get me into Hammill/Van der Graff, and I just couldn't get past the harshness. Then he gave me a tape of Vital and it all came clear.
    Maka ki ecela tehani yanke lo!

  7. #82
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    Going into the wayback machine, prog music was always with me since it's onset, however, it wasn't very accessible, one had to do some footwork to engage in the more obscure artists.uford
    Upon hearing Birds of Fire by Mahavishnu, made me fully aware that my wiring was a bit different from what was radio friendly. Zappa's Apostrophe' was a revelation especially George Duke's emotive synth which complimented FZ's lyrical scenarios.
    I felt a certain magic to know the sound of "the oil of Aphrodite, and the dust of the grand wazoo, he told me right then when top popped open their was nothing his box won't do......
    I agree with the post that mentioned UK's debut. That lp made a huge impact on me, ex KC alum, Wetton, Bruford, Roxy/Zappa alum - Jobson, and Soft Machine alum Holdsworth, it was a line up that could have gone totally Canterbury, yet what we get is an excellent advancement in Progressive Rock music for this era.

  8. #83
    Member hFx's Avatar
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    Personal revelations:

    Yessongs - prog is the thing!
    Rush - Farewell/Hemispheres - THIS is how prog should sound!
    Steve Hackett - Spectral Mornings - ALSO like this!
    (interlude with fusion, jazz, electronic, classical)
    Porcupine Tree - In Absentia - got me back to prog!
    Meshuggah - Catch 33 - can prog sound like THIS?

    Edit - King Crimson Discipline hit hard too but felt more like 10cc-ish art rock!

    Was heavily involved in music and quite aware what was going on also in "prog" but not much hit my strings until mid 2000's really...
    Last edited by hFx; 2 Weeks Ago at 05:43 PM.
    My Progressive Workshop at http://soundcloud.com/hfxx

  9. #84
    King Crimson-In The Court Of The Crimson King (Prog's Big Bang) & Larks' Tongues In Aspic (the seeds of Prog/Metal)
    Genesis-Nursery Cryme/Foxtrot/Selling England By The Pound & Yes-Fragile/Close To The Edge (heights of Symphonic Prog)
    Gentle Giant-The Power & The Glory/Free Hand (summits of complex & quirky Prog)
    U.K.-U.K. (Prog meets Jazz Fusion)
    Rush-2112/A Farewell To Kings/Hemispheres (early high points of Prog & Hard Rock)
    Dream Theater-Metropolis Pt. 2 ('70s Prog's resurrection via '90s Heavy Metal)

  10. #85
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    For me it would be VDGG-Still Life. I was a DJ at a college radio station in the mid 80s and at the time a prog fan of the 'Big 5' and Marillion. I read a book about Marillion where Fish said that Hammill was a far bigger influence than Gabriel, so I looked to see what the station had (this station had 1000s of LPs). The only VDGG they had were Godbluff, Still Life and World Record (plus a couple of 80s era PH solo albums, one being Skin which I still have a major soft spot for). For whatever reason Still Life was the one that hit me the hardest, and caused me to delve even deeper into prog and become a massive Peter Hammill fanboy.
    Later on, after leaving school, I would say hearing Il Baletto Di Bronzo-YS opened my ears to music with non-English vocals, and the vastness of Italian prog (and French, German, Polish,etc. etc.)

  11. #86
    without a doubt The Recommended Records Sampler
    it showed me that the progressive mindset could transform and metamorphose into new realms

  12. #87
    Quote Originally Posted by Udi Koomran View Post
    without a doubt The Recommended Records Sampler
    I would definitely agree that this is unquestionably the strongest and most widespanning collection of de facto progressive rock music I personally ever encountered. At the time of its release (1982), this double set presented everything imaginably cutting-edge in rock development. Nothing like it whatsoever, and certainly nothing by any "big prog" artists from the 70s.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  13. #88
    Faust: So Far
    Confirmed Bachelors: the dramedy hit of 1883...

  14. #89
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    I would definitely agree that this is unquestionably the strongest and most widespanning collection of de facto progressive rock music I personally ever encountered. At the time of its release (1982), this double set presented everything imaginably cutting-edge in rock development. Nothing like it whatsoever, and certainly nothing by any "big prog" artists from the 70s.
    I bought this in late 82 and it was like discovering a new continent and set my musical universe for decades
    it seems "old" now but at the time it was incredibly exciting

  15. #90
    ^ Some or much of the contents on that sampler appear utterly timeless. Very little of it sounds either contrived or dated, unlike, to my ears, stuff like 80s KCrim which somehow desperately established its own standard and then didn't or couldn't advance further on it.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  16. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by SunRunner2 View Post
    Tangerine Dream's "Phaedra"
    When I was in high school, I used to fall asleep to this album every night for quite a while.
    Dan Maske

  17. #92
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    The years below indicate when I discovered them, not necessarily when they were released:

    * 1987: Hemispheres - Rush
    * 1989: When Dream and Day Unite - Dream Theater
    * 1994: Ceux du dehors - Univers Zero
    * 2004: Of Natural History - Sleepytime Gorilla Museum

  18. #93
    Member Nashorn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kcrimso View Post
    I still have not seen that one...
    Do it, it's available on DVD. I think you won't regret it. It's one of the few documentaries I can watch repeatedly, I can always discover something new and it makes me happy every time.
    One thing is for sure, the sheep is not a creature of the air.
    https://sproingg.bandcamp.com/

  19. #94
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Maske View Post
    * 1989: When Dream and Day Unite - Dream Theater
    I bought this upon release - I think it is the exact same year - as a heavy metal fanboy and liked it very much. I knew nothing of classic prog, so along with Fates Warning- Perfect Symmetry they were the first indicators of the whole prog spectrum. I am no Dream Theater fan, but still cherish that first album and - maybe - the next one.
    The following year I bought 2112 and it was like an alien invasion in my world. A huge wtf full of possibilities. I never looked back.

  20. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Maske View Post
    When I was in high school, I used to fall asleep to this album every night for quite a while.
    Yes, I experienced the same somnolence while listening to the early T-Dream albums on earphones and while trying to finish off a 6 pack of Carlsberg Elephant beer. I was never able to make it past the 4th bottle of that hefty Danish brew and rarely eclipsed the 12 minute mark of "Rubycon, Part 2" before giving into a state of languorousness. But what a beautiful, hypnotic state it was.

  21. #96
    "somnolence". Heh. Tangerine Dream is the only band where I've fallen asleep during their concert.
    Maka ki ecela tehani yanke lo!

  22. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sturgeon's Lawyer View Post
    "somnolence". Heh. Tangerine Dream is the only band where I've fallen asleep during their concert.
    Now, that should be against the law. I wish I had taken the opportunity to see them live in the late 70's/early 80's when they were touring the US and oftentimes playing in churches. That would be something to experience and I wouldn't have needed an attention pill to stave off sleep. One of my favorite musical artists of all time.

  23. #98
    When Kerman insisted I listen to the Trout Mask Replica vinyl I had but it never clicked for me

  24. #99
    Member chalkpie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Udi Koomran View Post
    without a doubt The Recommended Records Sampler
    it showed me that the progressive mindset could transform and metamorphose into new realms
    Absofruitly! Love it. One of the greatest albums ever imo, regardless of compilation or not.

  25. #100
    For me the first game changer was PFs Ummagumma. Until then I associated most of the prog with a rock interpretation of classical music (Nice) or melodic extended rock songs (Moody Blues or Procol Harum).


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