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Thread: The mosterish banged-up, beater lp in your collection

  1. #1
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    The mosterish banged-up, beater lp in your collection

    Indeed I get it that the greater part of collectors on this forum have no desire - or perhaps funds - to get into collecting vinyl.

    For those who do have actual lps at their back....this thread.


    In case to do with a lp being played to death and mishandled and gone to crap by your own blame, or whether you bought it used in such sorry shape,

    WHICH LP IN YOUR COLLECTION IS IN THE WORSE SHAPE?

    And for what reason.



    ......


    Mine be THE FIVE FACES OF MANFRED MANN ('66,Capitol rainbow). Scratched all to hell.

    I bought it like this and I don't particularly like the music.

    So, why is it in my collection?

    Because,although its not ,persay, a gamechanger/cornerstone lp, it is, to my view historically important .By turns I am nowise a completist, yet I feel certain lps are important enough to merit a place in your collection, even if they are rather far-ancillary to the genres you esteem.

  2. #2
    Member Lopez's Avatar
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    Mine is Autumn Stone by the Small Faces on the Immediate label. It's so scratched, it's unlistenable. I bought it that way (about 40 years ago) just so I could say I have a copy of it in America.
    Lou

    Awarded the Krusty Brand Seal of Approval. It's not just good, it's good enough.

  3. #3
    Member frinspar's Avatar
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    The soundtrack to Super Fly. Also bought it that way. It doesn't skip at all and the scratches sound like someone crinkling the cellophane from a pack of smokes the entire time, which sounds just fine to me with the music.

    Rainbow Rising somehow got a fat lump on the outer edge of side 1, making it a deep depression on side 2 of course. Makes it not worth playing. But I keep it because that cover is badass.

  4. #4
    Member nosebone's Avatar
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    Sing Along with Mitch

    It was my fathers, bought in the mid 60s beaten to death
    no tunes, no dynamics, no nosebone

  5. #5
    Simon and Garfunkel, Sound of Silence. An original, my mother bought it when it came out.
    Maka ki ecela tehani yanke lo!

  6. #6
    Highly Evolved Orangutan JKL2000's Avatar
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    If I understand the questions properly (I have very few LPs left), the most beat-up one I have is the LP of Yellow Submarine I bought, new, back in 1971 or so when I was a kid. I just took bad care of it, played it a lot, brought it to friend's apartments, brought it to college later, etc. It served me well, so I can't just get rid of it like you would a girlfriend.

  7. #7
    ^ "can't just get rid of it like you would a girlfriend" - this made me laugh
    "One should never magnify the harsh light of reality with the mirror of prose onto the delicate wings of fantasy's butterfly"
    Thumpermonkey - How I Wrote The French Lieutenant's Woman

  8. #8
    Never Ever Land by The Pink Fairies. Cover torn, long and discriminating scratch all over side 2 ("Uncle Harry's Feak-Out"). Side 1 barely spinnable; sounds like a cozy turn in front of a campfire. It was a ludicrously badly produced record to begin with, of course - although musically arguably the best they did. For a long time I didn't even bother to provide a plastic- or paper inner pocket for the vinyl itself, but then I grew a bit fond of that side 1 and washed it up to take greater care. It's not nearly as historically interesting as the Deviants releases (which were also rawer and musically better in their "proto-punk" capacity), but it somewhat fits along that parameter nonetheless.

    Bought it cheaply anyway, knowing I'd never ever get to sell it.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  9. #9
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    I know there are 1 or more albums in my collection more beat up then this one (friends and acquaintances over time passing them my way because I am a collector of sorts). And perhaps this should be the topic of another thread (already done in the past?), but the album in my possession the longest (and still fully playable without any skips or sticks) is "The Electric Prunes". I have had it for 54 years.

  10. #10
    Oh. Let me change that. The S&G is the most beat-up for a music LP. The most beat-up of all, that I didn't think of, is unquestionably David Frye's Richard Nixon Superstar, a comedy album that I played to death in the early '70s. Scratched, plowed, the cover held together with ancient Scotch tape...utterly unplayable.
    Maka ki ecela tehani yanke lo!

  11. #11
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    My first album, Dark Side of the Moon. Played to death, Got another, then the MFSL album, then CDs. The other played to death album was Elton John's Blue Moves. The album that I bought 3 times because it never sounded quite right was Genesis' And Then There Were Three.

  12. #12
    My original of Sgt. Pepper. My sister owned it and, at one point, covered the gatefold with aluminum foil to hold under her chin to get a sun tan. It's still my favorite album and, of course, have purchased a few copies since then. I actually have the best vinyl ever pressed of it: the Japanese red vinyl mono edition from 1982.
    "A conspiracy of silence speaks louder than words."

    - Dr. Winston O'Boogie

  13. #13
    Member dgtlman's Avatar
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    Even though I haven't listened to it in years I'd have to say my triple gate fold copy of All The World's A Stage is my most worn out (still have it). Had the 8 track in my car that I wore out too.

  14. #14
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    These were beat to death before I rescued them from my mom's house ten+ years ago, but they're the ones I grew up with and I keep them around for the sentimental value even if they're for all intents and purposes unplayable:

    IMG_1653.jpgIMG_1654.jpg
    David
    Happy with what I have to be happy with.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    Never Ever Land by The Pink Fairies.
    It's called Never Never Land, you moron!
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by jammyoldboot View Post
    Indeed I get it that the greater part of collectors on this forum have no desire - or perhaps funds - to get into collecting vinyl.

    For those who do have actual lps at their back....this thread.


    In case to do with a lp being played to death and mishandled and gone to crap by your own blame, or whether you bought it used in such sorry shape,

    WHICH LP IN YOUR COLLECTION IS IN THE WORSE SHAPE?

    And for what reason.



    ......


    Mine be THE FIVE FACES OF MANFRED MANN ('66,Capitol rainbow). Scratched all to hell.

    I bought it like this and I don't particularly like the music.

    So, why is it in my collection?

    Because,although its not ,persay, a gamechanger/cornerstone lp, it is, to my view historically important .By turns I am nowise a completist, yet I feel certain lps are important enough to merit a place in your collection, even if they are rather far-ancillary to the genres you esteem.
    The Who - Live At Leeds. I may have gotten this out of a dumpster but it's in such awful shape I wouldn't use the crappiest turntable you could find, one you can ruin, and I wouldn't play this one. Shame as I hear it's kinda ok.
    Carry On My Blood-Ejaculating Son - JKL2000

  17. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by frinspar View Post
    The soundtrack to Super Fly. Also bought it that way. It doesn't skip at all and the scratches sound like someone crinkling the cellophane from a pack of smokes the entire time, which sounds just fine to me with the music.

    Rainbow Rising somehow got a fat lump on the outer edge of side 1, making it a deep depression on side 2 of course. Makes it not worth playing. But I keep it because that cover is badass.
    That's the only album I have in a frame. It just deserves it, it's so cool and the music is legendary for us geeks. Should buy some more frames as there really are some cool covers out there. How to display something like Paradise Theater or that Sonata Arctica album which had multiple covers, that's kinda tricky.
    Carry On My Blood-Ejaculating Son - JKL2000

  18. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    washed it up
    So what's the best method of cleaning vinyl? I've got a handful I'd like to try and clean up but unsure of how to do this properly.
    Carry On My Blood-Ejaculating Son - JKL2000

  19. #19
    24 Carat Purple. Borrowed it from the library, a long time ago, but dropped something on it, so one side was unplayable and I had to replace it.

  20. #20
    Member FrippWire's Avatar
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    Mine is an unplayable copy of Loading Zone's self-titled debut album. I've only ever seen one copy in a used record store and I bought it in spite of its terrible condition.

    From their Wikipedia page:

    American rock band, formed in Oakland, California, in 1966; disbanded in 1971.
    The original lineup was Paul Fauerso, bassist Bob Kridle, drummer Ted Kozlowski (replaced by George Newcom), and guitarists Peter Shapiro and Steve Dowler, both formerly of Berkeley psychedelic rock band The Marbles. In 1968, a new lead vocalist, Linda Tillery, was recruited.
    The band first split in 1969 after the failure of their self-titled debut album.
    In 1969, Fauerso re-formed the group with new members- guitarist Steve Busfield, bassist Mike Eggleston, and drummer George Marsh, and initially with previous horn players, Todd Anderson (tenor sax) and Patrick O'Hara (trombone). Anderson was replaced after a few months by Ron Taormina. Fauerso also recruited drummer, Frank Davis to play with the group for a while. During this brief period, the band performed with two drummers at the same time - Davis and Marsh.
    The band recorded their second LP One for All for their own label, Umbrella, before disbanding in 1971.

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