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Thread: Music Related Mandela Effect moments

  1. #1
    Oh No! Bass Solo! klothos's Avatar
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    Music Related Mandela Effect moments

    If you dont know what the Mandela Effect is, its a person or group of people having memories of specific events that never happened.

    Read more here:https://www.verywellmind.com/what-is...effect-4589394

    While we all know that the mind isnt the most accurate tool for recalling data (and there are many reasons that the Mandela Effect could be nothing more than the mind's inaccuracies), there are many instances of large numbers of people that have experienced the same memories. I have one such music memory and want to share it to see if others had it....

    I also want you to post and share your own Mandela Effect memory to see if others have had it

    Heres mine:

    Climax Blues Band who, although had a decent LP discography, is basically a Two Hit Wonder as far as US singles are concerned: "Couldnt Get It Right" and "I Love You"

    When I was in my mid teens, I bought the single for "I Love You" and I specifically remember that the 45 label listed the artist as Climax from an album by Climax. I remember thinking this must be the band that did "Precious and Few". I also remember reading in Billboard (my brother, who was a working DJ at the time, had a subscription to Billboard) a small article saying that the band was formerly Climax Blues Band and had dropped the "Blues Band" part of the name to be more commercially viable in an era where short band names were commercially successful. Why did they do that? That names already taken.....OK, thats a lawsuit waiting to happen.......

    Since then (I never looked back....ooops, sorry), I can't find anything that what I remember about that song or what I read as ever happened. Searches of pictures of the 7 inch 45 record show the artist on the "I Love You" single as Climax Blues Band. The album its from, Flying The Flag, also listed as Climax Blues Band. Videos from on-set TV music shows show Climax Blues Band........Im completely stumped and bumfuzzled to having such specifics in memories without it ever have happened

    If anybody remembers what I remember, please post

    And dont forget to post your own Musical Mandela Effects to contrast/compare
    Last edited by klothos; 1 Week Ago at 09:15 AM.

  2. #2
    Banned Dave (in MA)'s Avatar
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    Several years ago when I read that Percy Heath had passed away, I thought, hmm. I should listen to that Heath Bros. album that I have. It's been a long time.

    I started looking around in my vinyl, which I rarely use anymore and is stored away in a few different locations in my house. I couldn't find it. I thought maybe I left it behind when I got married, and maybe my father dumped it off at the church bazaar or something--nah, I wouldn't have left any vinyl, maybe I mis-filed it, so I looked again. Nope. \_(ツ)_/

    A long time later--a year at least--I happened to be sorting through some miscellaneous music/audio stuff which is also where I keep the handful of maybe half a dozen total 45's that I ended up with (not much for singles), and there it was: The "Heath Bros. album" that I *knew* that I owned: https://www.discogs.com/Various-Indi...elease/1900881 A 7" four track various artists EP that had one Heath Bros. track on it that it finally dawned on me was a promo freebie thrown in when I bought something else. Maybe the fact that it's a 33⅓ record tricked me into being certain that it was an LP.

  3. #3
    My own symptoms include dreams : I somehow seem to remember an album that I only saw or heard in a dream, because the dream was vivid enough to leave a strong imprint. For instance, there's a part of me that tends to "remember" that there was a 3rd Deep Purple studio album featuring both Jon Lord and Steve Morse, because I dreamt of it - and probably did so several times. There are several of these "ghost albums" from my dreams, even though I never really believe thery're real. That's not quite the effect you mentioned, but with aging my memory is getting more and more confused.

    One example. I was sure I owned that prog album Nelson Mandela recorded with Miles Davis and Jon Anderson just before he died in 1980, but I can't seem to find it anywhere in my collection. Maybe I sold it when I foolishly got rid of those Climax Blues Band singles.

  4. #4
    I don't really have any "Mandela Effect" things related to music. For me, it's more movies and TV. Like I could swear that The Deadly Assassin was the only six part Doctor Who story, and I don't remember The Sontaran Experiment being only two episodes. I remember everything else being four parts (note: this was in the early 80's, when PBS still showed the episodes individually, with the recaps at the beginning and teaser at the end of each episode narrated by Howard DeSilva, before the new distributor started cutting each serial into a sort of a "movie" format).

    And there was one movie that I remembered seeing when I was around 10 years old, called Birds Do It, which I could have sworn starred Jerry Lewis. I don't actually remember the title, but I remember the basic premise of the film. So I spent years, lookign for this Jerry Lewis movie in video stores, movie history books, IMDB, etc, that I remember from when I was a kid. I eventually found out the title, and also why I could never find it when I searched for Jerry Lewis pictures: it actually starred Soupy Sales!!!!

    With music, the most I've gone in that direction is confusing the names of musicians who I read about in Guitar Player before I actually heard them. Typically, it was musicians with similar names, e.g. Ralph Towner and Robin Trower, or Pat Metheny and Pat Travers, etc. In the case of Metheny/Travers, I had seen Metheny's video for Are You Going With Me on HBO's old Video Jukebox in like 1982 or 1983, probably, I think just once. So I knew I had seen a video by someone named Pat, but I wasn't sure if it was Metheny or Travers. Remember, I was 9-10 years old at the time, had never heard Travers' music (only knew he existed because I saw him mentioned in Guitar Player) and with no Youtube or anything like that to look it up on, I wasn't sure if they video I had seen was Metheny or Travers.

    What usually happens to me, besides that, is the tendency to remember a song, but not who sang it. For 37 years, I remembered a song called She Can't Wait that I saw on MTV regularly circa 1983. It's only recently I figured out it was a band called Spys, which was formed by a couple of the original guys in Foreigner. Another one like that was Telegraph by Orchestral Maneuvers In The Dark. I saw that video a few times back around 82 or so, but only a few times, I didn't remember the name of the band. Then sometime later, I saw OMD mentioned in a book called Rock Hardware, in the section on (naturally) synthesizers. And Ir emember thinking, "I know that band name for someplace". Then of course, they had their mid 80's hits that made them reasonably recognizable Stateside. It was until the Youtube era that I somehow stumbled upon the Telegraph video and I realized it was OMD!

  5. #5
    Well, guess what, it looks like I do have my own Mandela Effect report:

    So one of my favorite bands from the 80's is the Australian group The Church. So one of the things I have by them is the video compilation their late 80's/early 90's Stateside label Arista put out, called Goldfish (Jokes, Magic & Souvenirs). This is just a VHS comp of most (but, as I eventually found out, not all) of the videos they did during the 80's, with various home movie (looks like shot on camcorder) interstitial bits. One of the bits is Steve Kilbey, in the vocal booth, recording a song. You see him sing the chorus of the song at hand a couple times, then he sort of develops this "I'm having a seizure" facial expression, he puts his hands up to his face, they start trembling in time with the staccato guitar riff, then he draws his finger across his throat, in a "cut" motion.

    Now, the thing is, for the last whatever it's been let's say circa 30 years, as I'm reasonably certain I bought in 90 or 91, I've been trying to figure out what this mystery song was. I always assumed it must have been on one of the albums I didn't have (at that point, Seance and Remote Luxury) or one of their non-album B-sides. But time has revealed it's none of those.

    So here's where the Mandela Effect comes in: in 1994, The Church put out an album called Sometime Anywhere. When it was first released, it came with a bonus disc called Somewhere Else, with about 30 minutes of bonus songs. Now, I've had this thing for 26 years, I'm sure it couldn't less than 25 because I know I bought it at Wax Stax, which closed in 1995.

    Anyway, so today, I was listening to both discs for the first time in ages, I guess this was one that didn't connect with me the way their 80's era records did (and in fact, I remember taking a pass on their next album when I subsequently saw it in stores, as a result. Lo and behold: first song on Somewhere Else. And guess what: the first song, entitled Drought, and identified as being from a 1987 recording session in Amsterdam, turns out to be that mystery song! Wait, I've owned that damn song all this time and I didn't know that was it?! I'm sure I must have listened to the bonus disc at least once in 94-95, but I dunno how I missed that.

    Or maybe I didn't listen to the bonus disc at all, and that's the real reason I don't remember it.

  6. #6
    Member Vic2012's Avatar
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    somehow seem to remember an album that I only saw or heard in a dream
    I've had a few dreams like that. Your mind makes up bands and songs that don't exist but in the dream it's like reality or an alternate universe.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Vic2012 View Post
    I've had a few dreams like that. Your mind makes up bands and songs that don't exist but in the dream it's like reality or an alternate universe.
    Right, I've had a few of those...some non-existent "lost" Magma album or whatever (wait a minute, but that actually happened: TWICE!) or whatever. I've had dreams about non-existent movies, or I find episodes of old TV shows that I'd never seen before, ya know, "lost" episodes of Star Trek or Flipper or whatever. I've had that happen a lot.

  8. #8
    Member Vic2012's Avatar
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    I've had dreams where I hear a heavy guitar riff that I've never heard, that doesn't exist. Just dreamed up.

  9. #9
    Member Vic2012's Avatar
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    And I've had some weird dreams where I'm solving weird, Martian, mathematical equations. ....

  10. #10
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    The Big Bang

  11. #11
    Oh No! Bass Solo! klothos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    Right, I've had a few of those...some non-existent "lost" Magma album or whatever (wait a minute, but that actually happened: TWICE!) or whatever. I've had dreams about non-existent movies, or I find episodes of old TV shows that I'd never seen before, ya know, "lost" episodes of Star Trek or Flipper or whatever. I've had that happen a lot.

    For the record, I didnt start the thread to debate merits of pseudoscience based on how many lava lamps I can drink --- as a matter of fact, Im very much a skeptic about such things. Still, the memories I have are pretty solid that it is very baffling.

    The only issue I have with dream explanations is the nature of just how dreams work: the creative side of a persons brain is actually shut off during REM sleep. Everything you recall is something that you have seen or experienced, just thrown together in some haphazard Dali-esque collage. When you see a face in your dream that you don't know, its actually someone you have seen before (even for an instant, like a passer-by) that - for whatever reason - you subconsciously memorized and stored, and that goes for almost anything in a dream.........

  12. #12
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BravadoNJ View Post
    The Big Bang
    You remember it?
    He did not know that the sword he'd hold, would turn his priceless empire into fool's gold...

    http://www.discogs.com/user/moecurlythanu/collection

  13. #13
    My perception of all this is related to a) the dream thing, that I mentioned above, and b) the conscious work of imagination, because from my childhood to my young adult years I spent a lot of time creating music in my head, including many imaginary albums by real artists. It was such fun that I couldn't help it. (You don't know hown many 'Pink Floyd' or 'Genesis' songs and albums I created.) So it is no wonder that such imaginary music did also pop up in my dreams, since it was also part of my conscious life. (This thing spontaneously slowed down when I started creating my own real music.)
    Yet I don't confuse any of these creations with real music by real artists, so it did not seem to create false memories. And if it had done so, it would be very unlikely to find anybody on earth that would relate to similar false memories.

    But I look forward to finding an example I could relate to, maybe later in this thread...

  14. #14
    Except ... and y'all are missing the point ... the real key to the Mandella Effect is that many people "remember" the event in question. A great example is Neil Armstrong's words when he stepped onto the Moon. (Well, actually the very first words when he touched the surface with his foot were, "It's some kind of gray crumbly stuff, I can kick it around with my foot" - or something like that -but anyway) An awful lot of people remember "That's one small step for a man, one giant leap for Mankind."

    Except he didn't. In the recordings he said "That's one small step for man".

    Not a man. But millions remember that "a". (Which was what he meant to say, and he himself later insisted he had said, in despite of the tapes.)

    The mismemory of those millions are the Mandella Effect at work.
    Maka ki ecela tehani yanke lo!

  15. #15
    Oh No! Bass Solo! klothos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sturgeon's Lawyer View Post
    Except ... and y'all are missing the point ... the real key to the Mandella Effect is that many people "remember" the event in question. A great example is Neil Armstrong's words when he stepped onto the Moon. (Well, actually the very first words when he touched the surface with his foot were, "It's some kind of gray crumbly stuff, I can kick it around with my foot" - or something like that -but anyway) An awful lot of people remember "That's one small step for a man, one giant leap for Mankind."

    Except he didn't. In the recordings he said "That's one small step for man".

    Not a man. But millions remember that "a". (Which was what he meant to say, and he himself later insisted he had said, in despite of the tapes.)

    The mismemory of those millions are the Mandella Effect at work.
    Yes. Thats why I started the thread: I was wondering if anybody remembers the Climax credit to the "I Love You" single. I figured PE was a good place to ask because of the depth, scope, and knowledge here seemed like the right place to ask. If its just me, Im thinking my wires got crossed somewhere......but if others said "Yeah, I had that 45...and it did say Climax", then...........

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Sturgeon's Lawyer View Post
    Except ... and y'all are missing the point ... the real key to the Mandella Effect is that many people "remember" the event in question. A great example is Neil Armstrong's words when he stepped onto the Moon. (Well, actually the very first words when he touched the surface with his foot were, "It's some kind of gray crumbly stuff, I can kick it around with my foot" - or something like that -but anyway) An awful lot of people remember "That's one small step for a man, one giant leap for Mankind."

    Except he didn't. In the recordings he said "That's one small step for man".

    Not a man. But millions remember that "a". (Which was what he meant to say, and he himself later insisted he had said, in despite of the tapes.)

    The mismemory of those millions are the Mandella Effect at work.
    The first part isn't remember, because it hasn't been repeated a million times in documentaries and whatever, parodied as many times, etc. As for them remembering the indefinite article, most people probably insert it in their minds because that's what would be grammatically correct. Armstrong may have said the indefinite article, as he maintained, that a momentary glitch in the transmission rendered it inaudible.

    But there's a website about that stuff, and some of it's just plain stupid, like people insisting that they remember We Are The Champions ending with Freddie singing "of the world". If that's the way you remember it, because you never spent any time with the damn studio record, because if you did, you know that ending isn't on the studio version. Freddie only finished the line when they performed it live.

    I got into this stupid debate with someone on one of those sites, who insisted "Oh, sometimes he sang it, sometimes he didn't". I'm like 'Dude, I'm a lifelong Queen fan, I have live recordings from every tour, I know what Freddie did and didn't do onstage". Then the guy posts a Youtube link with "proof" that Freddie didn't always finish the line live. Then he posts a clip from some movie where the song was used in the closing credits, where it goes from Freddie singing "of the world" to something else, and I'm trying to explain to him how it's possible to edit tape, especially if you're a professional audio engineer working in Hollywood, so that you can go from the middle of one song to another. I dunno, maybe the guy was just trolling me. (shrug)

    As for people thinking Nelson Mandela died in prison, they probably have him confused with Steven Biko. You might think "How can you get two people mixed up liek that?", trust me, I've seen plenty of interviews over the yeras where people are unable to correctly answer questions like "Who was the first President of the United States" or "Who won WWII" or whatever. It absolutely makes sense they would have Nelson Mandela and Steven Biko mixed up. And they both had songs written about them, too!

    A lot of people don't realize that Lassie ran for almost 25 years, or that Timmy wasn't Lassie's first owner, because for decades, the episodes with Timmy in them were the only ones that got reran.

  17. #17
    Banned Dave (in MA)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sturgeon's Lawyer View Post
    "That's one small step for a man, one giant leap for Mankind."
    The only time I ever heard "a man" was when I saw a documentary that mentioned that he was supposed to say that, but either blew it, or there was a hiccup in the radio transmission that made it appear that he never said it.

  18. #18
    Banned Dave (in MA)'s Avatar
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    A lot of people think it's "Steven Biko" when it's actually Stephen with a 'ph'.

    KOp0sa6.jpg

  19. #19
    Yes, the collective aspect is essential to a true Mandela Effect, that's why I'd like to read about a musical example I could relate to. Unfortunately the Climax Blues Band one doesn't work for me.
    I remember someone posting something to that effect on a music forum years ago :" I'm sure I've heard a studio version of PF's Shine On You Crazy Diamond where there was a guitar solo at that precise time, that version was on an official vinyl pressing of the regular album I don't own anymore and I can't hear it on currently available versions. Why has that solo disappeared ? I can't be the only one to remember it."
    I didn't share the same memory and thought it was a mistake on his part, since I knew the original vinyl and thought that it would be strange to erase a Gilmour solo from such a classic and well-known album, but if other people had had the same 'memory' it would have been interesting. (I seem to remember that he was the only one with that memory, so there was no true Mandela Effect, but I may be wrong !)

  20. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave (in MA) View Post
    A lot of people think it's "Steven Biko" when it's actually Stephen with a 'ph'.
    Well, when you've got names that can be spelled multiple ways, that will happen. Is it Sean, Shawn, or Shaun? Is it Alan, Allan, or Allen? Is it Luc or Luke? Is it Hendrix or Hendricks?
    I remember someone posting something to that effect on a music forum years ago :" I'm sure I've heard a studio version of PF's Shine On You Crazy Diamond where there was a guitar solo at that precise time, that version was on an official vinyl pressing of the regular album I don't own anymore and I can't hear it on currently available versions. Why has that solo disappeared ? I can't be the only one to remember it."
    I didn't share the same memory and thought it was a mistake on his part, since I knew the original vinyl and thought that it would be strange to erase a Gilmour solo from such a classic and well-known album, but if other people had had the same 'memory' it would have been interesting.
    Would be interesitng to know which solo he was talking about. I know there's various edits that have been released in various places, but to my knowledge there's no version that has anything that's not on the album version (other than maybe the quad mix, which I believe read used different takes for one or two of the solos).

  21. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    Would be interesitng to know which solo he was talking about. I know there's various edits that have been released in various places, but to my knowledge there's no version that has anything that's not on the album version (other than maybe the quad mix, which I believe read used different takes for one or two of the solos).
    My guess is that he was talking about the solo that starts around 7:20 (in the first half), after Wright's solo. That solo was skipped in the later Post-Waters PF versions, and in Waters' solo versions too. Maybe that person had gotten used to those later versions and hadn't listened to the original album in a long time, and he correctly remembered that there 'used to be' another solo.

  22. #22
    One that I just remember is Pink Floyd's Relics. I had this on cassette in the early 90's, and I honestly don't remember Biding My Time or Paintbox being on it, but apparently they were there, as, to my knowledge, there's no release of that best of that's missing those two songs. When I heard them later on, sourced from bootlegs, I didn't recognize either song. The weird thing is I could remember at least a little bit of all the other more obscure songs on that one, but not those two. Well, actually, I don't remember Cirrus Minor much either, but I remember there were two songs from More.

  23. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Sturgeon's Lawyer View Post
    Except ... and y'all are missing the point ... the real key to the Mandella Effect is that many people "remember" the event in question. A great example is Neil Armstrong's words when he stepped onto the Moon. (Well, actually the very first words when he touched the surface with his foot were, "It's some kind of gray crumbly stuff, I can kick it around with my foot" - or something like that -but anyway) An awful lot of people remember "That's one small step for a man, one giant leap for Mankind."

    Except he didn't. In the recordings he said "That's one small step for man".

    Not a man. But millions remember that "a". (Which was what he meant to say, and he himself later insisted he had said, in despite of the tapes.)

    The mismemory of those millions are the Mandella Effect at work.
    I don't have any Mandela memories myself (or at least I don't think so, my memory's not what it used to be), but I suppose one example is Jim Morrison getting his knob out at a concert.

  24. #24
    Wait, what - he didn't?
    Maka ki ecela tehani yanke lo!

  25. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Halmyre View Post
    I don't have any Mandela memories myself (or at least I don't think so, my memory's not what it used to be), but I suppose one example is Jim Morrison getting his knob out at a concert.
    I was gonna suggest that's different, but maybe it's not. At Morrison's trial, there were people who testified he hadn't pulled it out, and others said he had. Whether this was "mass hysteria" or what, who knows? I remember seeing this thing about The Doors on TV where they showed this propaganda film with all these teenagers who looked like they'd be susceptible to Kool-Aid hawking "clergymen", who comment about how "dangerous" and "subversive" Jim Morrison was. One kid even says something to the effect that he's not that familiar with The Doors, but "I've heard Morrison is trying to create a bad scene" or whatever. It's the most idiotic thing you've ever seen.

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