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Thread: The History of Yes Pt. 1- w/Henry Potts & Aymeric Leroy

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    Moderator Sean's Avatar
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    The History of Yes Pt. 1- w/Henry Potts & Aymeric Leroy

    I occasionally do a themed episode on my show and I'd been itching to do one about Yes. Rather than hear me jabber on for the duration I brought in a couple co-hosts that will surely be familiar to you here- Henry Potts (Bondegzou) and Aymeric Leroy (Calyx). Two quasi-historians. You've no doubt seen Henry's long running (about 25 years) Yes info site, Where Are They Now? Aymeric wrote an excellent book on Yes as well, so they seemed the perfect co-hosts. This show was a first too. The first one to take place in three countries at once- the US, UK, and France.

    I suspect a lot of this isn't new to you many of you, but I hope we managed to offer it up in a somewhat fresh way. I learned a few new things, maybe you will too. A lot of my viewers aren't into prog per se, so some of this was done with them in mind too.

    I will add time stamps to the comments ASAP, indexed for each album. The first part of the show is about us and our memories of finding Yes. Then we dive into a deep look at their discography.

    I was foolish to think we could cover all this in one show. You just can't gloss over the albums or it will just be a typical look at their past that you've heard. So as it drew on I realized we better stop once we discuss Drama and do the rest in another show in December.

    So here is the debut through Drama....

    Last edited by Sean; 3 Weeks Ago at 12:00 AM.

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    (aka timmybass69) timmy's Avatar
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    nice!
    "Why is it when these great Prog guys get together, they always want to make a Journey album?"
    - fiberman, 7/5/2015

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    Sounds great so far, Sean. Will have to break this one up a bit into different segments, given the running time.

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    Moderator Sean's Avatar
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    I would too. Time just flys when you start talking music.

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    Member Top Cat's Avatar
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    wow, this looks really interesting.
    Like other people have suggested, I'll check this out later today(in segments)..great idea for a themed show Sean.
    Soundcloud page: Richard Hermans, musical meanderings https://soundcloud.com/precipice Bandcamp: https://richardhermans.bandcamp.comYouTube: https://youtu.be/F34jl6fQVmA

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    I must apologise to fellow Yes experts/trainspotters that at one point I got mixed up between Jack Barrie (who ran the Marquee Club and the La Chasse bar where Jon and Chris met) and Roy Flynn (who ran the Speakeasy and Blaise's where Yes played their breakthrough gig leading to Flynn becoming their manager).
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  7. #7
    Great episode as always.
    It takes a Yes themed show to hear a french guy speak english so fluently (bravo Aymeric). Things are always a bit strange in Yesworld.

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    Member Steve F.'s Avatar
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    Quite honestly, these are probably the only two people that I would have ANY interest in hearing speak about YES!

    Great pick! Will listen tonight.
    Steve F.

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    please add 'imo' wherever you like, to avoid offending those easily offended.

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    Member since March 2004 mozo-pg's Avatar
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    Great idea for co-hosts. I really enjoy reading their posts here. I'll definitely tune in this week!
    What can this strange device be? When I touch it, it brings forth a sound.

  10. #10
    Thanks for posting.. I'll listen later today

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    Member since March 2004 mozo-pg's Avatar
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    I managed to squeeze in all 3 hours on a rainy Sunday afternoon. It was one of the most fascinating interviews yet, encloypedic (sp) knowledge. The history was presented in a in interesting and engaging way. I think Yes is almost as good as Genesis.
    What can this strange device be? When I touch it, it brings forth a sound.

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    Member since March 2004 mozo-pg's Avatar
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    The PowerPoint slide show was an excellent idea. My first Yesshow was in the Round in 77 (I think).
    What can this strange device be? When I touch it, it brings forth a sound.

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    Moderator Sean's Avatar
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    I'm glad you enjoyed it. These themed shows are showing me that I can take a favorite subject and make a show out of it that can be as interesting as when I have a regular guest. It helps to have talented co-hosts the know the subject inside and out. I can see a number of themed shows coming up in the next 6 months. There's other catalogs I would like to look into. And sub-genres

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    Member since March 2004 mozo-pg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sean View Post
    I'm glad you enjoyed it. These themed shows are showing me that I can take a favorite subject and make a show out of it that can be as interesting as when I have a regular guest. It helps to have talented co-hosts the know the subject inside and out. I can see a number of themed shows coming up in the next 6 months. There's other catalogs I would like to look into. And sub-genres
    I greatly enjoyed it! One thing you said particularly resonated with me. Tales is my favourite Yes album. Despite it being maligned, you stand firm is recognizing is beauty and scope of effort. The artwork is georgeous.
    What can this strange device be? When I touch it, it brings forth a sound.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by mozo-pg View Post
    I greatly enjoyed it! One thing you said particularly resonated with me. Tales is my favourite Yes album. Despite it being maligned, you stand firm is recognizing is beauty and scope of effort. The artwork is georgeous.

  16. #16
    Oh I really enjoyed that. It's ace that no matter how many books and articles you read, there is always another titbit that forms a more detailed picture. I didn't know that JA was in the frame in the build up to Drama in early 1980, I thought that him and Rick Wakeman had had some kind of heart to heart in Montreux and decided to definitively split together at that point.

    Can't wait for part 2! What happened to Benoit??

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    Quote Originally Posted by revporl View Post
    I didn't know that JA was in the frame in the build up to Drama in early 1980, I thought that him and Rick Wakeman had had some kind of heart to heart in Montreux and decided to definitively split together at that point.
    That happened in Paris. The heart-to-heart surely did happen in some form, but as we know, what cut the Paris sessions short was Alan's broken ankle. Surely, the seeds of Anderson and Wakeman leaving were sown during those unpleasant sessions, but the band didn't break up there and then. Chris Welch's report in Musicians Only in February 1980 describes a rehearsal/writing session with Anderson trying out lyrics/melodies to the other three's musical ideas. It is said that Wakeman can't yet join them due to him being a tax exile in Switzerland, and will only attend the eventual recording sessions. The decision to relocate to London made it a problematic situation for Wakeman, where no such restrictions were placed on him if the process took place in Paris, i.e. outside the UK. Whether it was truly Wakeman's intention to eventually join them is difficult to know, but once Anderson was out of the picture, so was Wakeman, and he has been consistent in his "no Jon, no Yes" stance since.
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    Musicians Only - February 23, 1980 (Part 1)

    Yes, The Basement Tapes

    By Chris Welch

    Packed into a small hot basement studio, the group were rehearsing. They could have been any one of a thousand bands. But as they laboriously suffered the birth pangs of an idea, with an accompaniment of grunts, gestures, winks and nods, familiar to all musicians in the throes of creativity, it was evident their particular brand of telepathy was born of long association

    For this was Yes, hard at work, creating new music for the 80's and facing up to the challenge of a second decade together. Jon Anderson sat on a high stool clutching his acoustic guitar and repeatedly playing back sections of the rehearsal on a cassette machine, forever by his side.

    In the far corner, Steve Howe, bending over a slide guitar and obviously extracting great pleasure from a series of ascending notes that sounded like a Grand Prix racing car tackling some of the more torturous bends at Brands Hatch.

    Chris Squire loomed large beside me, swaying slightly with his massive bass guitar, producing an array of tones and effects courtesy of the latest in Microchip technology, and exchanging encouraging glances with drummer Alan White, his alter ego in the Yes rhythm section. Alan, in dazzling white John Travolta-style waistcoat, was emersed in his trusty Ludwig drum kit, attacking them with that mixture of hard-rock violence and jazz independence peculiarly his own.

    The music roared, shuddered, flared up and faded, leaving a curious silence in a room overcrowded with equipment. 'What was that called?' asked a voice. My own. The tension relaxed into smiles. 'No 3, I think', said Steve. Yes never like to be tied down until that final moment when they are on stage and have one real commitment, their audience.

    Yes still have a devoted worldwide following, unbowed by the howling wind of change that swept through rock during the last couple of years. They expect to sell two million albums a year on back catalogue alone. And from the evidence of the rehearsal I saw in London last week, they haven't lost their creative drive.

    Yet they will be the first to admit there have been doubts fears and torments. Nobody likes to appear out of date, least of all a group who have been accustomed to setting the pace.

    At the end of last year, they tried the experiment of recording in Paris with producer Roy Thomas Baker, most famous for his work with groups like Queen. The music was good apparently, but it wasn't quite Yes and the work got binned leaving the group to face 1980 without an album in the can. With Rick Wakeman in exile in Switzerland, the rumours began to grow that Yes were finally on the verge of chucking in the towel. But the group insisted, when they talked exclusively to Musicians Only, that they'd never let Yes fade away on a negative note after all the hard work and past battles fought and won.

    And in many ways, now is a singularly positive time for the much loved band. They realise that music, like art and life, is made up of a series of compromises, and that the pursuit of perfection is always doomed. It was that pursuit that drove them onwards throughout the greater part of the Seventies.
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    Musicians Only - February 23, 1980 (Part 2)

    Yes, The Basement Tapes

    By Chris Welch

    What now is their motivation? Steve Howe explained there is a desire to recreate some of the happiness that characterised their first five years together. And part of that desire involves a search for roots and the reasons why they started creating music together in the first place. Hence the return to London as home-base, and the blowing together on songs instead of putting albums together in patchwork-quilt fashion in the oft dehumanising processes of the recording studio.

    Jon Anderson is enjoying the delights of a hit single, 'I Hear You Now' with Vangelis, and more Yes singles are on the way, including the unexpected teaming of Chris Squire and Phil Lynott, and the vocal debut of Mr Rick Wakeman whose 'I'm So Straight I'm Weird' threatens to be very silly indeed. All this is building up towards the full blown return of Yes next summer, when they will release their follow up album to TORMATO and embark on a world tour that will include Great Britain -- or UK as it is now known.

    Despite all this outward activity, are Yes inwardly happy? I got the feeling they had been unnerved by the rapid pace of events in their home country, over-stretched by constant touring, and were yearning to find their old togetherness and special Yes chemistry. Whether it is working for them again, we won't know fully until they release their next album and start touring again. But from conversations with Jon, Alan, Steve and Chris it was evident they were still as dedicated to the idea of Yes. The absence of Rick Wakeman was explained by his limited number of days off from exile in Switzerland. He was due to rejoin the group for recording within a few days. And Jon's apparent tiredness was understandable after long hours of singing and going through arrangements.

    As I arrived, they were picking their way carefully through a difficult piece involving a section with Alan battering out a phrase in 6/8 time in unison with the bass and guitar which returned to a typical Yes loping backing beat, Jon singing high wordless vocals over the top, which suddenly reminded me of The Police. Except that Yes had been doing that kind of thing for rather a long time!

    Soft discussion followed the hot blasts of music. 'We go back to A when Steve starts the slide, right?...' 'Gosh that guitar sounds horrible'... 'What's that bit? O, it's all come flooding back...'

    And none of it was written down. Every twist and turn, every change of rhythmic emphasis and spiralling sweeps of chords had to be memorised and honed by constant repetition. But once the phrases had dovetailed together, even in a room smaller than most offices, without windows, air-conditioning or audience, they sounded a helluva band.

    When did they start work again, I asked Jon?

    'We've been back in town since last year, and we started rehearsing in January. We hope to record in March or April in England -- at Virgin's Town House Studio. The LP will be out in June, and it's our first in two years. After our last tour of America the group was exhausted. But it was a great tour -- one of our best. Now we want to have a rethink for the new decade. We're into the Eighties now, and what we are doing now is to look ahead to the next few years and redefine the group. All of us face a challenge. There are so many good things going on now and the music scene has blossomed after the doldrums of the Seventies. The last couple of years have been confusing as regards what is important -- what mattered to people. With our group it has to stem from a musical appreciation, and that has not been the focal point -- has it? It's been an image time.'
    Calyx (Canterbury Scene) - http://www.calyx-canterbury.fr
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    Musicians Only - February 23, 1980 (Part 3)

    Yes, The Basement Tapes

    By Chris Welch

    Did Jon find it unsettling -- a time to question their beliefs? 'In a way we do that all the time. But now there have been additional pressures on us. We have always tried to battle against the danger of resting on our laurels. Now we want to do a good tour of England -- that's very important to us. Many of the older bands seem to be thinking the same way.'

    Was he excited about his single success with his keyboard-playing buddy Vangelis? 'It's nice to hear the single getting played. It's from the album SHORT STORIES we did together in three weeks. We've been close for years as you know.'

    Another important facet of the Yes return was the reappearance of Eddie Offord, the engineer who worked on many of the classic albums and now lives in America. 'Eddie's coming in March, and we don't know how it will work out, but he's coming over to see if he can produce us again. We have high hopes.'

    Alan White explained that when he saw him in Woodstock, New York, Eddie had been recording groups by putting himself in the middle of the studio and placing the musicians all around him, a technique he may try on Yes. 'He's totally into it,' said Alan. 'He's got a lot of new ideas about how he wants to record Yes.'

    How was the new album shaping up so far?

    'We've done ten numbers,' said Steve, 'and the music is now being structured. Basically it's Yes instrumentals and songs with more precise interplay between the structures. We're not rushing things though; we need time before we go into the studios.'

    It was time for a break in rehearsals and Chris and I repaired to the studio lounge to talk about his solo plans and his view about the current state of Yes.

    I was intrigued to hear that Chris was planning to release a solo single with Phil Lynott and said I didn't realise he know Phil. 'Well I didn't. We met in a traffic jam on the M4. I invited him over to my house for a jam and we got some songs down. He had a go on guitar, and we actually just did it in a jam situation. We didn't set out to write songs as such. It came about in the space of a couple of hours. Phil is one of the most spontaneous people I have ever come across with lyrics. It's his kind of song really -- I just put some harmony vocals on it. In fact the song _might_ be called -- "Call My Bluff" -- I'm not sure actually. That's one of the lines in the chorus. It's the first time I've recorded with anybody outside the group, although I did some stuff while we were on tour, in Los Angeles, with Toto and Greg Lake, believe it or not. We did the old Tamla number "You Keep Me Hanging On". But I had to leave to carry on touring and to this date it hasn't appeared. But the backing tracks were great! Jeff Pocaro was on drums. All these guys in Toto are LA session men. Greg was around because he was in the process of recording a solo album in LA and was using those guys to play on it. He may have postponed his plans for that album.'

    It was interesting that a lot of Britain's best players, including Carl Palmer, seem to be moving back to England. Said Chris: 'Well obviously the tax thing got a bit easier but I think it goes further than that. A lot of English musicians are remembering how much easier it is to work here. They feel more committed and convinced about what they are doing. The home feeling spreads into the music. Definitely that's true for me and the rest of the band. We started to do this album in Paris, which was a lot of fun but didn't quite have that feeling. I feel much more confident about what we are doing back in England.

    'It must have something to do with where we come from in the first place. I'm quite pleased everyone is getting back here. Rick is still in Switzerland which is where I lived for seven months in '77. And before that we lived in LA. After we did GOING FOR THE ONE in Switzerland, we went on a series of world tours, so we were away from England for twenty months, and of course everything was changing here. We came back then and did TORMATO which wasn't an entirely successful attempt to get back to roots.

    'We will be playing England this year probably in a mixture of ways and I don't know if we'll be using the revolving stage this time. It depends on the venues. There's a lot to be gained from playing in a smaller environment. We've yet to talk to Michael Tait, our stage manager, about plans. I don't know how much longer we'll carry on with the round stage. We might give it another year. We may do some dates in August and then some more in November and December.'

    What actually happened in Paris last year? 'Half the album came out really good... Alan broke his foot. Did you know that? No, I'm not going to tell you how! That's up to him. But that's what happened and we had to stop recording because he'd broken his bass drum foot. Also we had been recording with Roy Thomas Baker who is a lovely chap, but Yes work in a particular kind of way, and we weren't getting that into the music.' Although Yes now rate as one of the longest serving British rock bands, their audience, especially in America, seem to be getting younger and not older with the band. 'If you want to know my theory' said Chris, 'all the younger brothers and sisters of the kids who bought our original records are listening to them. You find kids now who would have been ten years old when FRAGILE was released, knowing everything about the album. They've grown up with the records.'
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    Musicians Only - February 23, 1980 (Part 4)

    Yes, The Basement Tapes

    By Chris Welch

    Did Chris think the next album would appeal to the whole new audience that has grown up for rock? 'I hope so -- it's a fact of life there is a certain age for record buying. Later on it's all on to nappies and prams. Obviously our next album has got to be as fresh as THE YES ALBUM was in 1971. We're trying to recapture that same kind of enthusiasm.

    'We've been through the phases of long, drawn out, Yes, orchestral-type pieces. The crux of the matter is not whether we do a three minute pop song or something twenty minutes long. It's the amount of energy that's in the music. That's what we captured in those early albums and was less evident in later albums. The band should be a band, all committed to the same end. That's how it was. We have to make sure, that's how it is now. Obviously when you're struggling, you're gonna go for it, necessity is driving you. You have to put yourself in that same psychological position and go for that commitment.'

    Did Chris think they had managed to regenerate that feeling?

    'Yeah! It's all part of coming back here and rehearsing in Bayswater. You don't have to force it and talk about it. Somehow it's naturally coming back. We feel more free to take chances as well.'

    Did he get tired of people's tendency (among the ill-informed) of bracketing Yes with other groups like Genesis and ELP? Chris grinned. 'As long as people still talk about us! I don't care what bracket they put us in. Our music is quite different but they still identify us with that era don't they? Obviously all three bands are different. It's a shame ELP split up.'

    While Chris was rehearsing he had proudly shown me his bass guitar, which seemed to produce a baffling array of effects. 'The St Louis Music Company had the basic idea. Instead of a guitarist needing pedals in front of him, how much nicer to make a guitar with all the effects built in. They tried it before unsuccessfully, but they really worked hard at it to make sure all the effects really sounded good. They came to me for advice on the shape of the guitar and its appearance. So I helped them to develop the idea and I have the prototype. You can exchange modules which fit into the back of the guitar, which give you the effects. There are fourteen varieties - fuzz, envelope shaper, flanger, octave dropper, all quite well known effects. But they are all damn good and close to the guitar. You don't have to go through lots of leads and lose quality. They are all perfectly matched to the guitar. That's why a lot of guitars don't sound good.

    'People have to find an effect that sounds good with their instrument because of the different strengths of the signal. Their idea was to build something that matched the guitar and you'd buy it all as a package. You can use two effects together of swap them around. The modules are filled with micro-chips and are about two inches square.

    'It's amazing. The flanger is one of the best I've ever heard and it's very small for such a complex effect. WIth another effect you can plug in a pair of headphones and listen to yourself playing. The rest are wah-wah sounds and bubbling noises. The octave box and flanger together is a particularly good combination, which you heard me using. The guitar itself is called an MPC but don't ask me what that stands for! My bass is a one-off, but it's now going into production. It won't be that cheap, probably between the cost of a Rickenbacker and an Alembic. It has a standard long scale neck. The reason the company came to me in the first place was because they saw me using a lot of pedals with my Rickenbacker and other guitars to get certain effects. They came to me and Said "Well Chris, just throw all this away and buy our new invention!" I guess it's full of micro-chips, because they are very cunning about it and keep it sealed inside a plastic blob so you can't find out what's in it. I know, they spent a year working on the flanger alone.'

    Chris planned to use the bass during recording and if it proved satisfactory he'd use it on stage as well. 'But I'll never forsake my Rickenbacker because it's a lovely guitar to play. I don't have to look at it. I've had it since 1965, and it's the guitar I've used throughout Yes' career. The relationship between me and that guitar has given me an identity.'

    Steve Howe feels much the same fondness and affection for his massive collection of guitars, although he was restricting his use of them on this stripped-for-action day of rehearsal. 'I was using a double necked slide guitar this afternoon,' he explained. 'I'm limiting myself quite a lot, and just brought down one Les Paul and a couple of Fenders. Most of the tracks will be done with those guitars and perhaps some others will come into it eventually.'

    Steve explained how they were working out the arrangements and new material. 'Jon or Chris will play something and then I think of another way of doing it, like the whining sound on the slide guitar, going up and up. We are interacting as opposed to developing ideas that had already been sketched out. It seems to be working and bringing out the best in the group. We've had twelve years to try out the other way! It's definitely the way we're doing it now and brought about a very happy feeling. We've got nothing to moan about anymore.'

    When the band started touring, would they incorporate any of their individual material? 'Who knows? It hasn't worked for us before. We didn't feel we could stick at it, at the expense of an audience. And to an extent, it's not what you play, it's how you play. Getting it across is crucial and the main priority is Yes music. Because we've got something going on quite urgent with us I don't think we'll be able to get the solo things in as well. When we take a break we can work on solo projects but right now it's eyes down.'
    Calyx (Canterbury Scene) - http://www.calyx-canterbury.fr
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    My latest books : "Yes" (2017) - https://lemotetlereste.com/musiques/yes/ + "L'Ecole de Canterbury" (2016) - http://lemotetlereste.com/musiques/lecoledecanterbury/ + "King Crimson" (2012/updated 2018) - http://lemotetlereste.com/musiques/kingcrimson/
    Canterbury & prog interviews - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdf...IUPxUMA/videos

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    Musicians Only - February 23, 1980 (Part 5)

    Yes, The Basement Tapes

    By Chris Welch

    How did Steve think Yes would sound in the eighties? He rolled his eyes heavenwards and smiled at the prospect of such a daunting prediction. 'Over the last few years we have been more song orientated although they've had instrumental sections. The main changes will come in the arrangements... I can hear the changes but to describe it in words is very difficult. I think we've got rid of the Yes doldrums -- those long, sustained doomy chords. You know, we'd reach a high and then switch to a cold abstract mood. We are re-organising lots of things like that, including our environment. There's a lot of bands coming up and for us it's time to spring clean. We've been perfectionists to a certain extent and after a while you get despondent because -- where is perfection? The only way we can reach perfection I guess is understand what everyone else wants. When you see a young group playing in a pub, well they've got an idea. That is their reason for existence. Well older groups have ideas too, and we've got one going right now. It's a real thing, not created by record companies or management.'

    Looking back, if there were faults in Yes music, what would Steve say they were? 'As I said, the search for perfection is an impossibility. A lot of happiness was created by Yes music in the first five years of the seventies, and to some extent, less happiness was created universally in the last five years.

    'And without realising it we directed our energies to America and let Britain drift which caused a certain amount of unreality. We'd get back from a tour and see what had changed here in just a few months. We want to be much more part of that, than what is happening in America. We've all got our ambitions but we want to see the group go on.'

    Could Steve imagine a life without Yes, if it all ground to a halt? How would it leave him feeling?

    'The way it happened would be a primary factor. I can believe it happening. Obviously I don't want it to happen, but one could accept it if the situation was -- "we have come to our end, let's cool it there." But we've been through lots of hard times, and you know that, and we've actually managed to come out of them again! So we feel, if we can't get through a problem after all these years, then we would have really failed in a very big sense.'

    Alan White was in a similarly determined mood. We adjourned to a nearby pub with sections of the Yes road crew and Alan talked about the spirit of the band. 'The last American tour was tremendous. We were number one in Billboard for the highest attendances of the year and we did something like fifty gigs which was a lot of work. And our album sales were between one and two million in America alone. The point is we're happy and creating music we want to create. We've never copped out or let down our ardent fans. And we're playing a kind of music that nobody else is playing. That's the whole idea of the band -- the whole concept. It's what makes us different. And now we're playing together again there is so much enthusiasm -- a big burst of energy that we can create among ourselves. It's what it's all about.'

    How did Alan see his function within Yes? 'I like to kick the band and make it heavy. But I also like to play jazz-oriented rhythms. I guess I play American orthodox style and the way I play feels comfortable to me. That's the main thing for any drummer, to feel comfortable.'

    Before Yes, Alan played in many different kinds of groups and with all kinds of artists. Many were involved in the heyday of Apple when he played on the legendary Peace in Toronto gig with John Lennon and on such classic songs as "Imagine" and "All Things Must Pass" with George Harrison. 'I miss playing along with other artists to a certain extent, but I get enough pleasure out of Yes and their music is always a challenge. It's never too easy.'

    Alan also plays guitar and has been writing a lot.

    'Some of it is not necessarily for Yes and will be developed for my next solo LP. I like to get the songs down on an 8-track, playing guitar and keyboards which I've been studying for a year. I use a drum machine first then add my own drums on after. Basically, I do the whole thing myself. I'd like to record with Jeff Berlin or Phillip Chen who are great bass players. But the solo LP is just in my head at the moment, I'm still planning it.'

    I had to tell Alan that I never liked the title of his last solo album RAMSHACKLED -- it seemed to cast a downer on proceedings. 'I believed in that project and was creatively involved in it for a long time. But the title wasn't my idea -- it was the guitarist's! I really believed in the music. People didn't understand what it was all about back in 1976. But I'm more interested in the future now. It's a very positive time for us.'

    Did Yes have a role in the eighties?

    'Absolutely! The eighties have given us a boost and I'm very enthusiastic about what's going to happen. There's a big world out there we're going to play to.'

    Why wasn't Rick on hand to get involved?

    'Rick can work things out really quickly and he doesn't like to spend a long time working through the arrangements. He can realise his keyboard role quickly, and he's working on a new solo LP and single right now. Being at home again will make us all feel much closer and recreate the English atmosphere of Yes.

    'The most important thing for me is touring and playing to the public. A drummer needs that more than most.'
    Calyx (Canterbury Scene) - http://www.calyx-canterbury.fr
    Legends In Their Own Lunchtime (blog) - https://canterburyscene.wordpress.com/
    My latest books : "Yes" (2017) - https://lemotetlereste.com/musiques/yes/ + "L'Ecole de Canterbury" (2016) - http://lemotetlereste.com/musiques/lecoledecanterbury/ + "King Crimson" (2012/updated 2018) - http://lemotetlereste.com/musiques/kingcrimson/
    Canterbury & prog interviews - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdf...IUPxUMA/videos

  23. #23
    Member Paulrus's Avatar
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    Good stuff, Aymeric -- thanks. It really helps fill in Yes' post-Paris sessions history.

    But it also makes me think things must have come to a REALLY abrupt halt not long after the Chris Welch piece was published. I'm sure some of it had to do with the music (I can imagine Jon telling the others "Look, I just had a hit with "I Hear You Now" -- why can't we go in that direction?" and the others say "No f-ing way."), but I'm also sure it came down to the money issues alluded to in Sean's interview with you and Henry. I remember one of you mentioning "wives" in that context, and it would be interesting to dig more into that!
    I'm holding out for the Wilson-mixed 5.1 super-duper walletbuster special anniversary extra adjectives edition.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paulrus View Post
    Good stuff, Aymeric -- thanks. It really helps fill in Yes' post-Paris sessions history.

    But it also makes me think things must have come to a REALLY abrupt halt not long after the Chris Welch piece was published. I'm sure some of it had to do with the music (I can imagine Jon telling the others "Look, I just had a hit with "I Hear You Now" -- why can't we go in that direction?" and the others say "No f-ing way."), but I'm also sure it came down to the money issues alluded to in Sean's interview with you and Henry. I remember one of you mentioning "wives" in that context, and it would be interesting to dig more into that!
    There are interesting elements in both the Dan Hedges and Chris Welch books. Surely there were issues with Jon overspending, consuming far more of his share of the band revenue, which Steve in particular resented, being far more frugal in his lifestyle. Things came to a head during a heated argument where Jon was offered a settlement - I think the idea was that he would renounce his fee for a certain number of shows so that the balance would be restored. Jon was offended and stormed out, or something like that. But was this the last straw ? Not sure. From the Hedges book, my understanding is that Anderson acted very much like Roger Waters later did with Pink Floyd - he stopped coming to rehearsals, believing that to be tantamount to the band ceasing to exist, or "taking a break", which was his suggestion to get over the crisis. But, much like Gilmour and Mason in 1986, Howe-Squire-White decided they had the potential to carry on without him. Surely manager Brian Lane must have also alerted them to the fact that a US tour was booked with tickets already on sale for some of the dates, and cancelling it would be a disaster for their finances.

    I've just re-read the relevant passages in the Hedges book and it's said that they were still in touch with Wakeman throughout this phase, with Wakeman being sent tapes of the new music, but not reacting to them much - he was busy working on his next solo album and was either too busy with that, or not too interested.
    Calyx (Canterbury Scene) - http://www.calyx-canterbury.fr
    Legends In Their Own Lunchtime (blog) - https://canterburyscene.wordpress.com/
    My latest books : "Yes" (2017) - https://lemotetlereste.com/musiques/yes/ + "L'Ecole de Canterbury" (2016) - http://lemotetlereste.com/musiques/lecoledecanterbury/ + "King Crimson" (2012/updated 2018) - http://lemotetlereste.com/musiques/kingcrimson/
    Canterbury & prog interviews - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdf...IUPxUMA/videos

  25. #25
    I'm here for the moosic NogbadTheBad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve F. View Post
    Quite honestly, these are probably the only two people that I would have ANY interest in hearing speak about YES!

    Great pick! Will listen tonight.
    Same for me, will listen tonight, great picks Sean.
    Ian

    Gordon Haskell - "You've got to keep the groove in your head and play a load of bollocks instead"
    I blame Wynton, what was the question?
    There are only 10 types of people in the World, those who understand binary and those that don't.

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