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Thread: When Bands Went on Hiatus in the 70s...

  1. #1

    When Bands Went on Hiatus in the 70s...

    It encompassed a shorter timespan than the time between albums for an active band today.
    No matter what anyone says, you are the decider of how you will listen to music.

  2. #2
    Yeah, in the 60's you had to do basically two albums a year, then in the 70's it kinda slowed down to one a year, most of the time. By the 80's, it was becoming commonplace to deliver an album every two or three years, and so on. Course, nowadays, the only bands worth listening to don't have the budget or the label connections to support that kind of a release schedule.

  3. #3
    Man of repute progmatist's Avatar
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    ^^ And they'd have to tour to support those 2 albums a year, all the while writing the material for their next album. In the end, they ran themselves ragged.
    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"--Dalai Lama

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by progmatist View Post
    ^^ And they'd have to tour to support those 2 albums a year, all the while writing the material for their next album. In the end, they ran themselves ragged.
    That's right. I remember there being a comment about how one of those guys in Jethro Tull mentioned that Ian Anderson would "retire for the night" earlier then the rest of the band, when they were on tour, but everyone knew that really he was going back to his room to write material so they'd have songs for them to do when they came off the road.

    A lot of time wasn't given to bands to get material together for the next album. There's the old mantra about how "You've got your whole life to write your first album, but only six months to write your second" and at least back then, that was true. That's why you sometimes had bands digging into their old material that didn't make it onto their first album to come up with material for the next album. I remember there's songs on Hotter Than Hell and Dressed To Kill that originated with Wicked Lester, the band Paul Stanley and Gene Simmons had before Kiss. And some of the stuff on the later Roth era Van Halen albums, that actually predated the first album. House Of Pain I think was on the demo they did in 1977 (with Gene, again), before they got signed to Warners, and I believe Jump was a few years old too by the time they recorded it.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    That's right. I remember there being a comment about how one of those guys in Jethro Tull mentioned that Ian Anderson would "retire for the night" earlier then the rest of the band, when they were on tour, but everyone knew that really he was going back to his room to write material so they'd have songs for them to do when they came off the road.
    Although in the interview on the 25th Anniversary Thick As A Brick, Ian says he was up at all hours furiously writing material to present to the band the next day.

    Deep Purple is the band I think of when it comes to album/tour/album/tour burnout.

  6. #6
    Member TheH's Avatar
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    It's all relative. The average CD today is worth 1.5 to 2 Albums in the 70s in minutes of recorded Music.

    And hardly any band makes real Money out of released Albums any more..

  7. #7
    Jazzbo manqué Mister Triscuits's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    A lot of time wasn't given to bands to get material together for the next album. There's the old mantra about how "You've got your whole life to write your first album, but only six months to write your second" and at least back then, that was true. That's why you sometimes had bands digging into their old material that didn't make it onto their first album to come up with material for the next album.
    Of course that syndrome is not limited to sophomore albums. Sometimes bands will resort to raiding their early leftovers well down the line, as with the Beatles reviving "One After 909" for Let It Be, or Procol Harum plundering their 1967 outtakes for both Exotic Birds and Fruit in 1974 ("Monsieur R. Monde") and Procol's Ninth the following year ("Pandora's Box").
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