Page 3 of 10 FirstFirst 12345678910 LastLast
Results 51 to 75 of 248

Thread: Eddie Van Halen Dead at 65

  1. #51
    Member AncientChord's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Mojave Desert
    Posts
    413
    Quote Originally Posted by Rarebird View Post
    He acknowledged he took the two hand tapping from Steve Hackett.
    I'm glad you acknowledged that. But no disrespect to a fine guitarist. I never did get into Van Halen as a whole. I had already moved on from the classic rock bands and into prog. Plus I truly hated David Lee Roth's adolescent screaming, which made me cringe. A bass player friend used to practice with his band back then in Pasadena, and I remember that his band used to gig with Van Halen in small venues before they got famous. And I had a part time job renting cars in Pasadena. David Lee Roth's proud father used to rent cars from me frequently. But I never dissed on his son. RIP Eddie.
    Day dawns dark...it now numbers infinity.

  2. #52
    Quote Originally Posted by Painter View Post
    As influential in his era as Hendrix was in his own. A fellow guitar-playing childhood friend and I agree after hearing this news ... the top three most influential guitarists - Hendrix, Eddie, and Jimmy Page. None of them were our favorite, but I can't think of three other guitarists that inspired as many people. It can be argued that without Eddie, Satriani and Vai likely wouldn't have had the careers they did, if at all.
    I would add Clapton to that list.

    Not that EVH might not have influenced him, but Satriani's guitar hero is Jimi Hendrix.
    "A conspiracy of silence speaks louder than words."

    - Dr. Winston O'Boogie

  3. #53
    Member Paulrus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    The Left Coast
    Posts
    1,477
    Quote Originally Posted by Zeuhlmate View Post
    The NYT has a new obit from Jon Pareles that includes this nugget:
    Another non-blues influence was progressive rock, particularly the keyboard-like tapping technique of the English guitarist Allan Holdsworth, which Eddie Van Halen used in some of his swiftest, wildest solos.
    I'm holding out for the Wilson-mixed 5.1 super-duper walletbuster special anniversary extra adjectives edition.

  4. #54

  5. #55
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    The Planet Lovetron
    Posts
    7,596
    65 is too young, but the legend will live on. I was a fan in high school, and first saw them play live at Cleveland Music Hall in 1980. They were supporting Van Halen II, and before the show they did an in-store at a record shop in Willowick, Ohio, or Painesville, I don't remember which. They arrived in a horse-drawn carriage, and stayed for maybe an hour. I got to meet all the band members, and they were having a blast, enjoying the whole Rock Star trip. I still have a bunch of photos somewhere that I took at that event. The concert was great, and I think I saw them two other times, the last on the Women And Children First tour. I like(d) the first 3 albums, but interest waned after that.

    Sad that he's left us.

  6. #56
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Parlin, New Jersey
    Posts
    1,970
    i was never a VH fan, but he was one of the best guitarists.... RIP

  7. #57
    I was in seventh grade in Okinawa, Japan living on an Air Force base, when I first heard a Van Halen song played live. We had a school event at a theater/movie theater where they had an actual Air Force touring rock band. Who would have thought? Everything but the hair. ;-)

    There were certainly other American rock bands out there, but Van Halen broke through to me where many English bands were. They were loud, and I liked it!

    I saw on another thread some folks mocking ( slightly ) Michael Angelo Batio, who is overkill for some folks, and I know he covers some Eddie songs, so I looked him up, and he has a video from six months ago where he plays through some Van Halen songs, with his added musical embelishments and speed. At least you get to see his hands. ;-)
    https://youtu.be/bW2oxzh0-pk

  8. #58
    Quote Originally Posted by luvyesmusic View Post
    I was in seventh grade in Okinawa, Japan living on an Air Force base, when I first heard a Van Halen song played live. We had a school event at a theater/movie theater where they had an actual Air Force touring rock band. Who would have thought? Everything but the hair. ;-)
    I read an interview in Guitar Player back in the 80's, with a Marine, I think it was, who was a bassist in a military band. Apparently, you have to double on a conventional "band instrument" like a brass instrument or sax or whatever, to be able to play in the "concert band" where they use guitar, Fender bass, etc. In fact, I remember seeing an military recruitment ad in one of the magazines around that time, that hinged on that very topic: "Join the Army! Play Guitar! See The World!" or whatever. When I joined the Navy, that was one of the things I put forth, the main stumbling block being I have zero formal training and at the time, didn't really read music very well (with basically zero sight reading skills) so that idea got binned.



    I saw on another thread some folks mocking ( slightly ) Michael Angelo Batio, who is overkill for some folks, and I know he covers some Eddie songs, so I looked him up, and he has a video from six months ago where he plays through some Van Halen songs, with his added musical embelishments and speed. At least you get to see his hands. ;-)
    https://youtu.be/bW2oxzh0-pk
    Maybe when I have some time on Monday I might take a look at that. The only thing I've really heard from MAB was that Nitro video that was posted on that other thread, and as I said there, it really made me feel like the whole "guitarmanship as Olympic level sports" thing had gone too far. It's easy to see why you had that big backlash against the shredders in the 90's, when hear something like that.

  9. #59
    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    I read an interview in Guitar Player back in the 80's, with a Marine, I think it was, who was a bassist in a military band. Apparently, you have to double on a conventional "band instrument" like a brass instrument or sax or whatever, to be able to play in the "concert band" where they use guitar, Fender bass, etc. In fact, I remember seeing an military recruitment ad in one of the magazines around that time, that hinged on that very topic: "Join the Army! Play Guitar! See The World!" or whatever. When I joined the Navy, that was one of the things I put forth, the main stumbling block being I have zero formal training and at the time, didn't really read music very well (with basically zero sight reading skills) so that idea got binned.

    It would certainly make sense to be a multi-instrumentist to have the honor and priviledge playing music in the military and having a side, fun gig, different than the norm. Funny thing is The Carpenters' Interplanetary Craft was also on the setlist. Didn't go over so well with the rest of the rocking songs.

    Too bad you couldn't play. I would have liked to have seen that article. The ad, I may have seen that but that was a long, long time ago. ;-) Reminds me a bit of that Goldie Hawn military movie where she signs up.






    Maybe when I have some time on Monday I might take a look at that. The only thing I've really heard from MAB was that Nitro video that was posted on that other thread, and as I said there, it really made me feel like the whole "guitarmanship as Olympic level sports" thing had gone too far. It's easy to see why you had that big backlash against the shredders in the 90's, when hear something like that.
    True, much was/is overkill. I love all music but am a huge 80s metal head, along with YES-fan. Trevor Rabin certainly didn't do it for this YES-fan, and he was below standards put against the shredders I enjoyed.

    Michael Angelo Batio is naturally left handed, usually plays right handed, but really is ambidextrous when it comes to playing. At around 64, he hasn't seemed to lose any of his guitar-gymnastics.

  10. #60
    Quote Originally Posted by Rarebird View Post
    He acknowledged he took the two hand tapping from Steve Hackett.
    See now, I remember him saying he got it from seeing Page do the Heartbreaker solo, where he does the hammer on/pull off thing with just his left hand, and Eddie said to himself, "I bet you could do that with your right hand too". On at least one occasion, he said something like "I'm not saying I was the first to do it, I'm just saying I didn't copy it from someone else".

    But Eddie was kinda known for telling tall tales in interviews. I remember when he was on Guitar Player the first time, he went into all this about his favorite Marshall was heavily customized, and how he used a Variac (which is actually really dangerous, you can get electrocuted using those things), and so on.

    Well about a decade later, Eddie took that amp into have some maintenance work on it, and the tech who worked on it said it was almost completely stock. Then a few years after that, Eddie said in Guitar Player that he was trying to give some attention Jose Arrerondo, the amp tech who regularly serviced his gear back in the day. He said though that Jose ended up getting mobbed by teenagers hoping to meet Eddie, apparently under the assumption that Eddie hung out at Jose's shop or whatever.

    There's also apparently multiple stories of how they got the car horn sound at the beginning of Running With The Devil.

  11. #61
    Occipital Provocatee Plasmatopia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Plague Sanctuary, Vermont
    Posts
    1,583
    I don't see why a Variac would be prone to electrocuting anyone. It's basically a metal box with a cord that plugs into the wall, an outlet to plug your amp (or whatever) into, and a knob to control the output voltage. You might do some damage to your amp though.
    Just sitting at home rocking back and forth and jealously caressing my invisible collection of theoretical assets.

  12. #62
    Member Zeuhlmate's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Copenhagen, Denmark
    Posts
    4,824
    Zappa taps on Inca Roads (1976)
    It has probably been invented several times independently.

  13. #63
    Member Guitarplyrjvb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Northeast Pennsylvania USA
    Posts
    714
    ^^ I believe Zappa's technique isn't tapping. He uses the edge of the pick instead of his right hand fingers and gets a very tasty trilling effect. The idea is basically the same, though. Using extended hammer-on's to get very fast phrases that would be difficult for a non-Holdsworth to execute!

  14. #64
    Member Garyhead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    720
    Quote Originally Posted by Zeuhlmate View Post
    Zappa taps on Inca Roads (1976)
    It has probably been invented several times independently.
    Emmett Chapman claims to have "invented" two hand tapping in 1969. He started producing Chapman Sticks in 1974.

    http://stick.com/
    The Ice Cream Lady Wet her drawers........To see you in the Passion Playyyy eeee - I. Anderson

    "It's kind of like deciding not to date a beautiful blonde anymore because she farted." - Top Cat

    I was expecting to be kinda meh, but it made my nips stiffen - Jerjo

    (Zamran) "that fucking thing man . . . it sits there on my wall like a broken clock " - Helix

    Social Media is the "Toilet" of the Internet - Lady Gaga

  15. #65
    Member Jerjo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    small town in ND
    Posts
    4,524
    My one frustration with Eddie was that he didn't push into other directions. There were so many possibilities within that soundscape he created and yet he confined himself into that hard rock structure. Oh sure, there were occasional instrumental bits on VH albums but he could have done so much more.
    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  16. #66
    Occipital Provocatee Plasmatopia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Plague Sanctuary, Vermont
    Posts
    1,583
    Just sitting at home rocking back and forth and jealously caressing my invisible collection of theoretical assets.

  17. #67
    Occipital Provocatee Plasmatopia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Plague Sanctuary, Vermont
    Posts
    1,583
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerjo View Post
    My one frustration with Eddie was that he didn't push into other directions. There were so many possibilities within that soundscape he created and yet he confined himself into that hard rock structure. Oh sure, there were occasional instrumental bits on VH albums but he could have done so much more.
    I loved EVH's guitar playing and he was amazing at what he did, but I feel like he just "knew what he knew" and didn't go beyond that.

    Just sitting at home rocking back and forth and jealously caressing my invisible collection of theoretical assets.

  18. #68
    Quote Originally Posted by Rarebird View Post
    He acknowledged he took the two hand tapping from Steve Hackett.
    That's cool, because according to wiki, it seems he didn't even know about that Genesis early on!

    " In 1972, the Van Halen brothers formed a band called Genesis featuring Eddie as lead vocalist/guitarist, Alex on drums, and Mark Stone on bass..."

  19. #69
    Member Paulrus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    The Left Coast
    Posts
    1,477
    Quote Originally Posted by Plasmatopia View Post
    Ironically, Steve Howe has mentioned Roy Smeck as an influence, and yet he never explored two handed tapping.
    I'm holding out for the Wilson-mixed 5.1 super-duper walletbuster special anniversary extra adjectives edition.

  20. #70
    ALL ACCESS Gruno's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Dio, Alabama
    Posts
    2,101
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerjo View Post
    My one frustration with Eddie was that he didn't push into other directions. There were so many possibilities within that soundscape he created and yet he confined himself into that hard rock structure. Oh sure, there were occasional instrumental bits on VH albums but he could have done so much more.
    Perhaps he stayed where he felt he could shine best with his own creativity.

  21. #71
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    The Streets of San Francisco
    Posts
    226
    Quote Originally Posted by syncopatico View Post
    That's cool, because according to wiki, it seems he didn't even know about that Genesis early on!

    " In 1972, the Van Halen brothers formed a band called Genesis featuring Eddie as lead vocalist/guitarist, Alex on drums, and Mark Stone on bass..."
    You beat me to it... I was just going to post their first band name was called Genesis! Another new thing of interest I read yesterday, Pete Townshend was approached to due the Michael Jackson Beat It solo... Pete did not feel it was a good fit for him so he recommended Eddie...

    On a side note I don't know the Van Halen catalogue very well, I heard a killer acoustic thing played on the Stern show yesterday. It was 90 second studio track, sounded like it could have been on Friday Night in San Fransisco with Di Meola, De Lucia/McGlaughlin... Does anyone have insight to the song names of things Ed did acoustically? I would love to hear them.

  22. #72
    ALL ACCESS Gruno's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Dio, Alabama
    Posts
    2,101
    Quote Originally Posted by rich View Post
    You beat me to it... I was just going to post their first band name was called Genesis! Another new thing of interest I read yesterday, Pete Townshend was approached to due the Michael Jackson Beat It solo... Pete did not feel it was a good fit for him so he recommended Eddie...

    On a side note I don't know the Van Halen catalogue very well, I heard a killer acoustic thing played on the Stern show yesterday. It was 90 second studio track, sounded like it could have been on Friday Night in San Fransisco with Di Meola, De Lucia/McGlaughlin... Does anyone have insight to the song names of things Ed did acoustically? I would love to hear them.
    Was it 316? Titled after his son's birthdate.


  23. #73
    Quote Originally Posted by Plasmatopia View Post
    I loved EVH's guitar playing and he was amazing at what he did, but I feel like he just "knew what he knew" and didn't go beyond that.
    He more or less admitted that over the years. In interviews he veered between tall tales and a big ego but also being quite humble about what he did and was trying to do.

  24. #74
    Quote Originally Posted by Plasmatopia View Post
    I don't see why a Variac would be prone to electrocuting anyone. It's basically a metal box with a cord that plugs into the wall, an outlet to plug your amp (or whatever) into, and a knob to control the output voltage. You might do some damage to your amp though.
    I've forgotten the explanation of the technical points, but I recall reading a couple different times in Guitar Player that electrocution is indeed a hazard with a Variac, and one article even said you basically have to use a wireless system to remove yourself from the amp's electrical circuit.

  25. #75
    Quote Originally Posted by Plasmatopia View Post
    If I remember correctly, that film is from the 1930's. Banjoist Jack Bland was doing fingerboard tapping as early as 1929:


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •