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Thread: RIP Jimi Hendrix 50 years ago today

  1. #26
    Member Jerjo's Avatar
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    A big memorial thread over on Hoffman

    https://forums.stevehoffman.tv/threa...s-gone.996761/
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  2. #27
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    The 1969 LA Forum and San Diego shows should have been re-released by now (instead of that In The West reissue, which added on some of San Diego as extra tracks). I think the only official release of either were in long-deleted boxes. And I understand that both of those were edited.

  3. #28
    Highly Evolved Orangutan JKL2000's Avatar
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    Whenever I think about iconic figures passing away, I wonder what Hendrix would have done if hed lived longer. Such a shame, not to know.

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by ronmac View Post
    I'm pretty sure that's only the first few seconds, isn't it?

    A better link



    I like this one better than the Fillmore one.
    Heard. Gotta be honest. No comparison to the definitive BOG version. Just my opinion.

    Today I watched A Band of Gypsys DVD that I've had for 10 or more years. It's a documentary but there's bonus footage of those Fillmore East shows.

  5. #30
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    ^That Fillmore show on the DVD happens to be the show which 'Machine Gun' on the original album came from. (I do not know if any others were videotaped but I doubt it.) A surprising amount of landmark live performances were caught on camera.

    I'm not mad about Buddy Miles but Band Of Gypsys has grown on me over the years. One I don't like much is the Isle Of Wight show. There's a good 'Red House' and 'Machine Gun' and a terrific closing version of 'In From The Storm'. Otherwise I find it a fairly depressing experience. ISTR he just chucked his guitar after finishing up the set.
    Last edited by JJ88; 4 Weeks Ago at 06:04 PM.

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by JJ88 View Post
    ^

    I'm not mad about Buddy Giles .
    Lol. Miles.

  7. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by JJ88 View Post
    One I don't like much is the Isle Of Wight show. There's a good 'Red House' and 'Machine Gun' and a terrific closing version of 'In From The Storm'. Otherwise I find it a fairly depressing experience. ISTR he just chucked his guitar after finishing up the set.
    Yep, the Isle of Wight show is not one of his better 1970 performances. Same with the Atlanta Pop show that they released not too long ago.
    "A conspiracy of silence speaks louder than words."

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  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by JKL2000 View Post
    Whenever I think about iconic figures passing away, I wonder what Hendrix would have done if he’d lived longer. Such a shame, not to know.
    Well I'm certain he wanted to progress musically, and was influenced by progressive rock. In 1969 he called King Crimson the best band in the world. And it is true that he also wanted to join Emerson, Lake & Palmer, but Emerson didn't want Jimi to steal his limelight. Many speculate that he would have drifted into the realms of jazz/fusion. Too bad we'll never know.
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  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by AncientChord View Post
    Well I'm certain he wanted to progress musically, and was influenced by progressive rock. In 1969 he called King Crimson the best band in the world. And it is true that he also wanted to join Emerson, Lake & Palmer, but Emerson didn't want Jimi to steal his limelight. Many speculate that he would have drifted into the realms of jazz/fusion. Too bad we'll never know.
    I don’t think Hendrix was planning to play with Emerson and Lake, but Mitch Mitchell might have been. I saw this 2012 article in ultimateclassicrock.com and I suspect Hendrix did not know he was being lined up to play with them.

    https://ultimateclassicrock.com/jimi...n-lake-palmer/
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  10. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by AncientChord View Post
    Well I'm certain he wanted to progress musically, and was influenced by progressive rock. In 1969 he called King Crimson the best band in the world. And it is true that he also wanted to join Emerson, Lake & Palmer, but Emerson didn't want Jimi to steal his limelight. Many speculate that he would have drifted into the realms of jazz/fusion. Too bad we'll never know.
    Betty Davis had already been trying to line up Jimi and Miles for a collaboration, so I'd say a move into some kind of fusion would have been inevitable. It might have been more toward soul jazz/funk (like Donald Byrd or the Headhunters) rather than chops-heavy "white guy fusion". God, Jimi would have made amazing music with folks like Herbie Hancock, George Duke or Alphonse Mouzon.

    There would have been a lot of commercial pressure against that from record labels and the crooks that were handling his business affairs, though. I also hate to say it, but dying young and pretty might have been the best thing that happened to his career. The solidification of pop genres in the Seventies (driven by the radio business) would have been a struggle for a genre-fluid musician like Jimi, and the business never had much use for people getting middle-aged.

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by profusion View Post
    There would have been a lot of commercial pressure
    "Jimi, this is David Foster; he'll be producing your next album... you don't even have to play guitar!"

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    I've been on a Hendrix kick for the last few weeks, and didn't realise it was the 50th anniversary until the other day.

    I already had the first three albums, but decided to buy the 4 disc box set to go deeper.

    I'm probably already preaching to the converted, but if you haven't tried this set then perhaps a blog I published yesterday might tempt you:
    https://momentstransition.wordpress....perience-2000/

  13. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by Valen View Post
    I've been on a Hendrix kick for the last few weeks, and didn't realise it was the 50th anniversary until the other day.

    I already had the first three albums, but decided to buy the 4 disc box set to go deeper.

    I'm probably already preaching to the converted, but if you haven't tried this set then perhaps a blog I published yesterday might tempt you:
    https://momentstransition.wordpress....perience-2000/
    Yes, it is indeed a great set and essential.
    "A conspiracy of silence speaks louder than words."

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  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Valen View Post
    I've been on a Hendrix kick for the last few weeks, and didn't realise it was the 50th anniversary until the other day.

    I already had the first three albums, but decided to buy the 4 disc box set to go deeper.
    The other essential studio recordings are his 1969/70 ones, released in a few permutations over the years. The 90s collections First Rays Of The New Rising Sun and South Saturn Delta are the easiest way to get them. Neither is especially well sequenced, IMHO, but most of the best recordings are there, at least.

  15. #40
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    Any recommendations on official live releases that are in print?
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  16. #41
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    The problem with most of Jimi's live concerts was the fact that he was ahead of his time, and technology had not yet caught up with him. Every time Jimi used the effects of the whammy bar on his Fender Stratocaster's, the abuse he gave the guitar basically put it out of tune, and he couldn't fix it until a break between songs. Plus in those days, tuning was by ear, not by a modern tuning device. And because of time restrictions, sometimes he didn't get the tuning quite right. Because of that many viewed him as a sloppy guitarist, which was not the case. I really have no idea what is still available, but here's my list of worthy listens. These are in no particular order: Live at the Monterey Pop Festival, 1967. Winterland, 1968. Hendrix In The West, 1972. Experience (Live at Royal Albert Hall) 1969. Live at the L.A. Forum (Inglewood) Bootleg 1969 (I was there at 15 years old. Plus it's a great performance.) The Complete BBC Sessions. (most of the tracks are live in the studio.) Happy listening!
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  17. #42
    Quote Originally Posted by AncientChord View Post
    These are in no particular order: Live at the Monterey Pop Festival, 1967. Winterland, 1968. Hendrix In The West, 1972. Experience (Live at Royal Albert Hall) 1969. Live at the L.A. Forum (Inglewood) Bootleg 1969 (I was there at 15 years old. Plus it's a great performance.) The Complete BBC Sessions. (most of the tracks are live in the studio.) Happy listening!
    Monterey is great.
    Winterland is liked by many, but he's not particularly sharp to my ears. Although there are some standouts.
    In the West is really good and still available. (I thought it was OOP.)
    Experience (Albert Hall) has never been officially released, but, IMO, is the best performance available. If you dig around, you can find it.
    LA Forum is pretty good and, I think was part of In the West.
    The BBC stuff is great.

    Other in print items to consider:

    I think no collection is complete without the Woodstock performance. Killer.

    Band of Gypsies is essential. But Buddy Miles's playing doesn't compare to Mitch's. There's also an expanded set of his Fillmore performances.

    Live in Maui will be out next month and is quite good.

    Live at Berkley is great.

    The new Atlanta Pop is pretty uninspired. Not necessary.
    "A conspiracy of silence speaks louder than words."

    - Dr. Winston O'Boogie

  18. #43
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    Actually the purple box has a decent selection of live tracks as an introduction. Some really early live performances on there, like fragments of a Paris gig from 1966.

    The original In The West is out of print. The CD using that title now is a weird mish-mash, with substitutions for the Royal Albert Hall tracks. I'd have preferred they'd have done a 2cd of San Diego and LA Forum in full.

    I quite like the 80s collection Concerts. Although the mix is very reverb-y, I think it kind of works- it has a nice flow to it. I listen to it surprisingly often. I don't think the later Winterland album is as good a listen.

  19. #44
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    Experience (Albert Hall) has never been officially released, but, IMO, is the best performance available. If you dig around, you can find it.
    As a matter of fact, that's one I do have...
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  20. #45
    Quote Originally Posted by JJ88 View Post
    The original In The West is out of print. The CD using that title now is a weird mish-mash, with substitutions for the Royal Albert Hall tracks. I'd have preferred they'd have done a 2cd of San Diego and LA Forum in full.

    I quite like the 80s collection Concerts. Although the mix is very reverb-y, I think it kind of works- it has a nice flow to it. I listen to it surprisingly often. I don't think the later Winterland album is as good a listen.
    Oh, yes, that's correct about In the West. My mistake.

    The Concerts collection has some great performances. But some are edited and, yes, it is way over-produced. Another cash grab by the evil greedy bastard, Alan Douglas.
    "A conspiracy of silence speaks louder than words."

    - Dr. Winston O'Boogie

  21. #46
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    The BBC Sessions are a good, fun listen. He played various tracks which he never did in the studio. The one session he did for Alexis Korner's show Rhythm And Blues (Zeppelin did an early session for this show too) was particularly good. I think it was all songs not on studio albums.

    There was recently a big box of the Fillmore shows recorded for Band Of Gypsys. I have the original album and that 2cd 'best of the rest' which came out in the 90s. Oh, and the DVD. I think the estate has access to the Fillmore multi-tracks now, which they didn't in the 90s.

  22. #47
    Quote Originally Posted by AncientChord View Post
    And it is true that he also wanted to join Emerson, Lake & Palmer, but Emerson didn't want Jimi to steal his limelight. Many speculate that he would have drifted into the realms of jazz/fusion. Too bad we'll never know.
    Do we know for sure that Jimi wanted to play with Keith and Greg? From what I recall, Keith said they jammed with Jimi, but nothing ever came of it. I can't imagine it working too well.

    There's always been talk that Jimi was going to make a record with Gil Evans, the bandleader and arranger who shepherded Miles Davis' Miles Ahead, Porgy And Bess, and Sketches Of Spain into existence. Gil, for his part, did an album of Jimi tunes in the mid 70's, as well as including them in his live sets and several of his subsequent albums. One version of the story has it that it was going to be Jimi, Gil and Miles working together.

    And I still think, the Gil Evans project aside, he'd have been more inclined to go into a funkier area, giving P-Funk, Kool & The Gang, and his old bosses The Isley Brothers a run for their money.

    As for live stuff, I used to think the mid 80's Live At Winterland release was really good, until I heard the unedited tapes of those six shows. The first show from the second night in particular, where he does like a 12 minute Are You Experienced?, with flautist Virgil Gonzalez sitting in, is really cool, but yeah, the guitar goes out of tune a lot, but you can hear how brilliant Jimi was a performer. I believe there's a version of Red House from each night, and each one is different. One really curious thing is the version of Fire that opens Live At Winterland was actually taken from the middle of one of the shows on the third night (or was it the second show on the second night?) where he had an organist sitting in, but they mixed the organist out. Just as well, since Jimi and Noel didn't bother tuning to the organ, so you've got that ever so slightly out of tune happening on the raw tapes.

    Speaking of Red House, I also recall there was a series of releases that came out in the late 80's, I think they were called The Jimi Hendrix Reference Library, or something like. And there was something like three or four different titles. Most of them were excerpts from songs and jams, showing Jimi's expertise in particular areas, like his use of pedals, or this or that playing technique. But one release was called Red House: Variations On A Theme, and it was I think 5 or 6 versions of the song, taken from various sources, mostly live versions, but there was one studio take, where he had cut it with an expanded band. And each version, again, was totally different. On a couple of them Jimi does this sort of chord melody solo, like the jazz guys do, and on one, there's a bit where Noel (I thikn it's Noel, it might be Billy) takes the bass "for a walk" (in other words, he drops into a walking bass line). To cap it off, there was a (at the time) new recording of the song, done by John Lee Hooker, to demonstrate that it was, at it's core, a straight blues song.

    And I still think the Voodoo Child/Stepping Stone/Star Spangled Banner/Purple Haze/Villanova Junction suite from Woodstock is one of the most amazing things imaginable.

  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by JKL2000 View Post
    Whenever I think about iconic figures passing away, I wonder what Hendrix would have done if hed lived longer. Such a shame, not to know.
    I'd like to think if had he lived (LONGER), Jimi would have seen what Genesis, ELP, Yes, and KC (also the early Krautrock experimental bands) were doing and try his hand at creating some extended, creative Spacey/Art/Prog rock stuff, much like he had already done on Electric Ladyland....

  24. #49
    Contrariwise, I think Hendrix would have moved more towards jazz and, ultimately, fusion. I have no real evidence for this but it seems to fit.
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  25. #50
    Quote Originally Posted by Mythos View Post
    I'd like to think if had he lived (LONGER), Jimi would have seen what Genesis, ELP, Yes, and KC (also the early Krautrock experimental bands) were doing and try his hand at creating some extended, creative Spacey/Art/Prog rock stuff, much like he had already done on Electric Ladyland....
    As you say, he had already done it in Electric Ladyland, so why would he go back? I can sort of see him doing something jazz oriented, as per the talk of the Gil Evans collaboration, but as others have said, if he was gonna go fusion, it was gonna more like Herbie Hancock's Headhunters, not Mahavishnu Orchestra, I think.

    But in the end, who knows what would have caught his interest. Maybe he would have heard something like Tangerine Dream and say "That's what I want to do next!".

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