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Thread: PFM's Jet Lag - Undervalued Or Jump The Shark LP?

  1. #51
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    Yes, it's a good reason to keep albums by your favorite bands that might be a bit spotty, but seem fresher after all those years because you haven't played them to death....

  2. #52
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    ^^^

    Agreed. My motto was that the more I liked an album, the less I played it. Seems like controverted logic to some, but it worked for me in extending a good deal of the albums desirable shelf life by years or decades. However, some didn't survive that logic and I got tired of them anyway, and retired them. All of PFM's albums worked out well and I still enjoy them immensely, with the exception of Passpartu and Suonare, Suonare, which I didn't like from the outset.

  3. #53
    Member since March 2004 mozo-pg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sputnik View Post
    Love Canto di Primavera! I think that was my first Banco album, I believe I found it used for almost nothing and took a chance. I still really enjoy it, though it is, as you say, a bit different from their earlier stuff. But still quite worthy to me. But this is the last of there's I enjoy.

    I know I tried Florian at some point. It didn't grab me. Maybe time for a revisit.

    Bill
    Bill, I started another thread on Banco. I'd be interested to hear your views.
    What can this strange device be? When I touch it, it brings forth a sound.

  4. #54
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    Jet Lag was a big disappointment after the brilliant Chocolate Kings. But Jet Lag is at least listenable, which I can't say of Passpartu.

  5. #55
    Small compilation the many various versions of "Impressioni" by Italian as well as international artist, including Battiato (of course, a top-5 hit in Italy in the late 90s), and Patti Smith singing a direct translation as opposed to Sinfield's. A bit of fun, this one.

    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  6. #56
    Member TheH's Avatar
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    ^^
    "Impressioni" is a cult classic in Italy. Many well known Pop bands covered the song (Matia Bazar, Marlene Kuntz etc.).
    Young Guys and Girls (even Children) sing that song at casting Shows and so on..

  7. #57
    I know. There are a few examples of the "evergreen effect" with international progressive groups, sporting songs that aren't necessarily too celebrated by their core fanbase but have become very well known with overall audiences - like this one and Itoiz' "Lau Teilatu" or "Ode Emile" by Ange. All of which are highly poetic and somehow direct statements of wonder.

    When Battiato did "Impressioni" it was, by his own account, out of respect for the song's depths of imagery and multi-levelled interpretations. There's pure love but also loneliness and immense alienation in those lyrics. Not as impossibly ambiguous as "Whiter Shade of Pale" perhaps, but almost passionately soaked in picturesque message none the less.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  8. #58
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    Small compilation the many various versions of "Impressioni" by Italian as well as international artist, including Battiato (of course, a top-5 hit in Italy in the late 90s), and Patti Smith singing a direct translation as opposed to Sinfield's. A bit of fun, this one.

    wow - interesting - the punk originator and the italian proggers Well.. Battiato himself started as an avant-garde progger - then turned pop AND successful...

    v

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