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Thread: Some recent discoveries and indulgences

  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by chalkpie View Post
    Michael - Where do these sit with you(?):

    Memoire Magnetique Vol I
    Les Soliel...
    La Brulure...
    Rock

    These are all on Tidal.
    Hi Frank,

    All 4 of these were released posthumously. "Rock" and "Memoire Magnetique Vol 1" on the Transversales Disques label stand apart from his wider catalog as both of these seem to be him messing around in the studio with a synth of some sort. This same label released a Francois Bayle archival session as well. I wouldn't say the Parm's are essential from this label and I definitely would not suggest starting a Parm binge with either of these. That being said, "Memoire..." is pretty darn good so, if you can grab that one, do it, it definitely has the Parm vibe to it, while "Rock" seemed almost like a semi-failed experiement.

    "Les Soleils de l'lle de Paques/La Brulure de Mille Soleils" was another posthumous release from 2018 and to be honest I haven't revisited it since I got it. I do remember my initial reception to it was not that enthusiastic but to be fair, it probably deserves to be revisited. Again, if you can get it cheap, or stream it somehow, I'd be curious to know what you think but compared to his catalog that was released while he was alive, this one didn't cut it for me if I remember correctly.

    Because of this thread, I started (which I hope will be) a major re-assesment of his works. Time permitting, I'll post some thoughts about certain pieces that I think stand out (which will be hard for me, since I have a very biased bro-love relationship with his music).

    best
    Michael
    If it ain't acousmatique-It's crap

  2. #27
    another discovery
    Hans Reichel: Shanghaied on Tor Road


  3. #28
    I loved this Tomas Di Muzio track since I first heard it on the RER Quarterly

    https://thomasdimuzio.bandcamp.com/track/inception

  4. #29
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    I mentioned earlier that I was doing a sort of re-assesment of Parmegiani's work. My source for this is the beyond great 12 cd box that INA GRM put out several years ago. It's billed as his complete works but it's really not given the posthumous releases over the last few years. Regardless, one could probably start and stop here and be satisfied with a lifetime of listening and re-listening. By the way, this exercise is really difficult for me because having to pick what I think is "essential" listening from him within a catalog of, for the most part, all essential is...well, an exercise in futility. I'll most likely run out of steam in posting stuff like this after a few when I fully recognize the futility of it all and just say fuck it...listen to it all. Anyway, here is my first choice...but first...

    Here is the box on the electrocd website that I'm using as my source:

    https://electrocd.com/en/album/2544/...icale_en_12_CD

    Right out of the chute, his first piece from 1963 called "Violostries" is a stone cold masterpiece of sonic manipulation. Here is an excerpt from a review on the Dusted magazine site about one of the re-issues of this piece.

    "The title track was his first major work. In 1963, the violinist Devy Erlih commissioned Parmegiani to make some music to accompany a dance performance; it took him over a year to realize the taped elements of the 16:39 minute-long piece. All of his contributions were sourced from violin sounds, which he sped up, slowed down, filtered, diced and stitched together into an alien accompanist to Erlih’s virtuoso fiddling, whose dramatic plucks and bowed slashes inhabit a realm of high flickers, low expulsions and warped re-shapings of the violin’s familiar sounds. At the time, it represented a challenge to listeners to give up their preconceived notions of any instrument’s limitations; over a half century later, it remains an amazingly detailed sequence of sound events."

    The piece was assembled the old fashion way with razor blade and tape. it must have taken him forever to build it up. Tod Dockstader worked in a similar manner early in his career too. It's split up into 3 parts but best listened to in its entirety all at once. I'll post a youtube but hearing it through a computers speakers DOES NOT do it service. It's all about the mixage, and Paremegiani is a master.



    best
    Michael
    If it ain't acousmatique-It's crap

  5. #30
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    Another Parm classic in my book. Also from Disc 1 on the box that I mentioned above ^^^

    The piece is "Jazzex". Similar (in concept) to "Violostries"..."Jazzex" deconstructs an avant garde jazz quartet while "Violostries" does the same with a (Classcal???) violinist. The fact that both this piece and the one above is from disc 1 of the box is probably telling that I might as well say the whole damm box is essential (which it is)...but, Ill try to cull.

    Here is a quote from the Francois Couture from the allmusic.com site that does a great job at describing it.

    "Clocking in at 17 minutes, "JazzEx" is the result of a collaboration between the composer and a free jazz quartet consisting of Jean-Louis Chautemps (sax), Bernard Vitet (trumpet), Gilbert Rovère (double bass) and Charles Saudrais (drums). The tape part was derived from recordings of the quartet that were manipulated in very creative ways, and the musicians interact with this part in real time, improvising their way through the piece. The result was resolutely ahead of its time, relegating most every other "psychedelic" experiment of the time to childhood noodling. The piece is fierce, complex, driving and relentless. It still sounds fresh to this day."

    I like his observation of the "psychedelic-ness", especially since I never really thought of it that way. But when I went back to listen to it again I can definitely agree that it is indeed, a lysergic listen. So, for anyone who is not really a free jazz, avant garde jazz fan, I don't think you should be put off from listening to this. The reason I say that is because I think the "real" reason you should listen (and this is not a denigration in any way to the Jazz musicians involved in this quartet) is because of the (sometimes subtle, sometimes not subtle) manipulations that BP did sonically with electronic tape.

    Usual disclaimers about listening to this through a casual Youtube link, but here it is:



    Best
    Michael
    If it ain't acousmatique-It's crap

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