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Thread: STEVE HACKETT - A Genesis In My Bed: The Autobiography review

  1. #76
    Quote Originally Posted by boilk View Post
    I didn't think that it was implied that it was. Just a general negativity at times, on Mike's part.

    neil
    My apologies if I misunderstood. I thought that old myth was resurfacing again.

  2. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by aith01 View Post
    My apologies if I misunderstood. I thought that old myth was resurfacing again.
    What is prog, anyways?

    neil

  3. #78
    Member Rajaz's Avatar
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    Was watching this latest Live CD/DVD set (Selling England-Spectral) over the weekend and was so surprised to see Steve's mom so vigorous and well spoken at her age!

    And Steve so graciously signing autographs and taking pictures with fans, a true gentleman and amazing musician as well.

    I too have the digital Biographical book and am keeping it in my "bed" while enjoying it!

  4. #79
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JJ88 View Post
    Yes I've never agreed with those Hackett quotes from Rutherford. Banks gets a lot of flak but he's always praised Hackett's contribution to the band. Go back as far as the A History (where Rutherford says that 'stronger player than writer' thing) documentary. Banks says that he was surprised Hackett left when he did, because of how much he had contributed to W&W. Similarly later on, he says that after Hackett left, he lost a musical ally, in terms of doing slightly more offbeat things.
    I knew it!!! It was not Phil that ruined Genesis, but Steve!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by Progatron View Post
    As far as I understand, there are legal reasons why Steve cannot delve too deeply there.
    Or maybe even Kim's fault?

    really bitter divorce, I guess??

    Quote Originally Posted by aith01 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Splicer View Post
    I'll assume that Mike wrote the lyrics to "Down and Out" considering how bitter they are.
    "Down and Out" was not about Steve.
    It's not that much about Steve (at least I don't read anything against him in those yrics) as the need to do something new and redirect into a new direction. At least that's the way I read back then, and I still fill it's a valid reading

    Quote Originally Posted by boilk View Post
    I didn't think that it was implied that it was. Just a general negativity at times, on Mike's part.
    I always assumed that it was Tony that had much bitterness towards Steve (since I always assumed nothing went on in Genesis withput his consent), but apparently it's Mike that is behind it
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from drug-addicts to complete nutcases.

  5. #80
    Quote Originally Posted by aith01 View Post
    "Down and Out" was not about Steve.
    Not what I meant (although I've heard those stories as well). They just don't sound very Banks-like although they might have a hint of Phil in the phrasing.
    No matter what anyone says, you are the decider of how you will listen to music.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rajaz View Post
    Was watching this latest Live CD/DVD set (Selling England-Spectral) over the weekend and was so surprised to see Steve's mom so vigorous and well spoken at her age!

    And Steve so graciously signing autographs and taking pictures with fans, a true gentleman and amazing musician as well.

    I too have the digital Biographical book and am keeping it in my "bed" while enjoying it!
    I still remember one of the times Steve played NEARfest (think this was Trenton). A bunch of people were hanging out in the hotel bar / lobby area and there stood Steve right in the middle of it all, just hanging out and talking to people. He seemed very friendly and genuinely interested in talking to people. It just seemed very cool to me.

  7. #82
    Quote Originally Posted by Progatron View Post
    I had previously met him in 2005, as well as his brother John, and we chatted about the then-new VDGG album Present. He was very warm and friendly. And now he's shared this book review on his Twitter, which sent our web traffic through the roof!
    Just curious... did Steve speak favorably of VdGG or was it not his thing? Also, is VdGG (or the Six Bob Tour of ‘71) mentioned in his autobiography (being fellow Charisma artists and a sort of sister act to Genesis in those days)? Thnx!

  8. #83
    Quote Originally Posted by Bucka001 View Post
    Just curious... did Steve speak favorably of VdGG or was it not his thing? Also, is VdGG (or the Six Bob Tour of ‘71) mentioned in his autobiography (being fellow Charisma artists and a sort of sister act to Genesis in those days)? Thnx!
    Yes, page 66/67. There's a typo there too "Van der Graff Generator" (twice in fact). Steve tells how he loved to move between the folks from Lindisfarne and VDGG in the tourbus. About the music he wrote: "Van der Graff Generator had an interesting sound, but for me Genesis' music was more special, with so much variety and potention."

  9. #84
    Jazzbo manqué Mister Triscuits's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by interbellum View Post
    Yes, page 66/67. There's a typo there too "Van der Graff Generator" (twice in fact).
    Of course the band's name was itself a typo all along; the inventor of the generator was Van de Graaff.
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  10. #85
    Insect Overlord Progatron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bucka001 View Post
    Just curious... did Steve speak favorably of VdGG or was it not his thing?
    I asked him if he had heard the new album and he hadn't. He asked me what it was called, and when I told him 'Present', he thought that was clever. He then said something about how they were a very good band, but we didn't stay on the topic long.
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  11. #86
    Down & Out lyrics (whomever wrote them) is the perfect explanation of why prog rock died by 1978. Corporate Rock, Punk, Disco, early New Wave were the flavors of the day. The Record company said to Genesis straight out, just like the Record Companies said to probably every other prog band or band who’s particular style was past the five year lifespan of any musical style, that Genesis had to know the score, that they are not getting any younger, that there were bands ready to take their place with a more commercial view and fresher face. So, boys, you best adapt to the times by writing shorter more accessible songs or go extinct.

    If you look at pop/rock music since the Beatles, most genres and bands in those genres have about 5 years before styles change. Yes, these bands can still record, tour, but few get past that “sell by” date.

    The Beatles constantly adapted to whatever style was happening at the time. From Chuck Berry type Rock N Roll, to Dylan, to Sgt. Pepper (Pet Sounds), Magical Mystery Tour and Psychedelic (Pink Floyd), to British Blues. The Stones did the same going from UK pop, to Brit Blues to Disco by the end of the 70’s.

    There have only been a few big time artists that were able to last with only minor changes to their sound/songwriting. Eric Clapton, Elton John, Bowie was a musical chameleon. Not too many others.

    John Wtton saw the same writing on the studio wall during UK as Genesis did in 1978. Better start writing hits boys . He got it right with Asia, and then Yes followed suit with 90125. If not for MYV, I doubt Asia and 90125 would have gotten any FM radio airplay and basically, Asia and Yes were 1 and done during the 80’s.

    I’m just happy that prog came back from the dead and many of my favorite bands reformed, put out new material, and toured. They mostly have to thank neo-prog bands (Marillion, IQ) for getting us through the 80’s into the 90’s; Flower Kings, Spock’s Beard for the 90’s and 00’s, which then gave birth to a prog renaissance. I think The Musical Box was also a HUGE reason for prog’s comeback and they must have certainly influenced SH to start Genesis Revisited.

    Finally, while Rutherford was probably the better “songwriter” during the 1971-1977 Genesis, Steve had the task of coming up with guitar parts that complimented and enhanced the music. That is “writing music.” Plus, after Steve left and Mike took over all guitar playing, he probably constantly heard criticism that he wasn’t as good a guitarist as Steve. Mike is a very underrated bassist, a GREAT 12 string player, and really the secret sauce to Genesis because he allowed Steve to not have to play rhythm guitar but instead come up with unique quirky additions. So, time for Mike and SH to kiss and make up already.

    After reading SH and Tony dissing each other about SH leaving Genesis since 1978, it made me happy when Tony admitted what a great song Blood on the Rooftops is. Tony’s synth playing really added to the song. And as much as I like Your Own Special Way and Wot Gorilla, SH was right that Inside & Out should have taken those two songs place on W&W - one of my top 5 albums of all time.

    Lastly, I LIKE MORE FOOL ME.

  12. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adinfinitum View Post
    Down & Out lyrics (whomever wrote them) is the perfect explanation of why prog rock died by 1978. Corporate Rock, Punk, Disco, early New Wave were the flavors of the day. The Record company said to Genesis straight out, just like the Record Companies said to probably every other prog band or band who’s particular style was past the five year lifespan of any musical style, that Genesis had to know the score, that they are not getting any younger, that there were bands ready to take their place with a more commercial view and fresher face. So, boys, you best adapt to the times by writing shorter more accessible songs or go extinct.

    If you look at pop/rock music since the Beatles, most genres and bands in those genres have about 5 years before styles change. Yes, these bands can still record, tour, but few get past that “sell by” date.

    The Beatles constantly adapted to whatever style was happening at the time. From Chuck Berry type Rock N Roll, to Dylan, to Sgt. Pepper (Pet Sounds), Magical Mystery Tour and Psychedelic (Pink Floyd), to British Blues. The Stones did the same going from UK pop, to Brit Blues to Disco by the end of the 70’s.

    There have only been a few big time artists that were able to last with only minor changes to their sound/songwriting. Eric Clapton, Elton John, Bowie was a musical chameleon. Not too many others.

    John Wtton saw the same writing on the studio wall during UK as Genesis did in 1978. Better start writing hits boys . He got it right with Asia, and then Yes followed suit with 90125. If not for MYV, I doubt Asia and 90125 would have gotten any FM radio airplay and basically, Asia and Yes were 1 and done during the 80’s.

    I’m just happy that prog came back from the dead and many of my favorite bands reformed, put out new material, and toured. They mostly have to thank neo-prog bands (Marillion, IQ) for getting us through the 80’s into the 90’s; Flower Kings, Spock’s Beard for the 90’s and 00’s, which then gave birth to a prog renaissance. I think The Musical Box was also a HUGE reason for prog’s comeback and they must have certainly influenced SH to start Genesis Revisited.

    Finally, while Rutherford was probably the better “songwriter” during the 1971-1977 Genesis, Steve had the task of coming up with guitar parts that complimented and enhanced the music. That is “writing music.” Plus, after Steve left and Mike took over all guitar playing, he probably constantly heard criticism that he wasn’t as good a guitarist as Steve. Mike is a very underrated bassist, a GREAT 12 string player, and really the secret sauce to Genesis because he allowed Steve to not have to play rhythm guitar but instead come up with unique quirky additions. So, time for Mike and SH to kiss and make up already.

    After reading SH and Tony dissing each other about SH leaving Genesis since 1978, it made me happy when Tony admitted what a great song Blood on the Rooftops is. Tony’s synth playing really added to the song. And as much as I like Your Own Special Way and Wot Gorilla, SH was right that Inside & Out should have taken those two songs place on W&W - one of my top 5 albums of all time.

    Lastly, I LIKE MORE FOOL ME.
    Extremely well written and insightful.
    Brian Dennehy: "I'm now 80 and I'm just another actor and that's fine with me. I've had a hell of a ride," ... "I have a nice house. I haven't got a palace, a mansion, but a pretty nice, comfortable home. I've raised a bunch of kids and sent them all to school, and they're all doing well. All the people that are close to me are reasonably healthy and happy. Listen, that's as much as anybody can hope for in life."

  13. #88
    Quote Originally Posted by Adinfinitum View Post
    Down & Out lyrics (whomever wrote them) is the perfect explanation of why prog rock died by 1978...
    Nicely said.
    No matter what anyone says, you are the decider of how you will listen to music.

  14. #89
    Member Guitarplyrjvb's Avatar
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    ^^ Yup, Adinfinitum sums up my feelings almost exactly. I haven't heard Inside and Out, though. Have to remedy that.

  15. #90
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adinfinitum View Post
    Down & Out lyrics (whomever wrote them) is the perfect explanation of why prog rock died by 1978. Corporate Rock, Punk, Disco, early New Wave were the flavors of the day. The Record company said to Genesis straight out, just like the Record Companies said to probably every other prog band or band who’s particular style was past the five year lifespan of any musical style, that Genesis had to know the score, that they are not getting any younger, that there were bands ready to take their place with a more commercial view and fresher face. So, boys, you best adapt to the times by writing shorter more accessible songs or go extinct.

    The Beatles constantly adapted to whatever style was happening at the time. From Chuck Berry type Rock N Roll, to Dylan, to Sgt. Pepper (Pet Sounds), Magical Mystery Tour and Psychedelic (Pink Floyd), to British Blues. The Stones did the same going from UK pop, to Brit Blues to Disco by the end of the 70’s.

    John Wtton saw the same writing on the studio wall during UK as Genesis did in 1978. Better start writing hits boys . He got it right with Asia, and then Yes followed suit with 90125. If not for MYV, I doubt Asia and 90125 would have gotten any FM radio airplay and basically, Asia and Yes were 1 and done during the 80’s.
    Always the way how I understood from the first time I sat down and heard the albums with the lyrics gatefold open on the first week it was out. But I didn't read it that the record label was saying it to the band, but rather thaty the band came to that idea themselves (and therefore took the time tto explain it to their fans)

    Not sure if the Beatles followed suit, rather than create them, though.

    Of course, it it wasn't for MTV, Asia wouldn't have sold neartly as many albums. Not that sure about Yes, though, for the sonic break was enormous between Tormato/Drama and 90125 (Owner of a Lonely Fart could've been a Duran track, for ex), much bigger than the sonic change between Danger Money and Asia's debut.
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from drug-addicts to complete nutcases.

  16. #91
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    In Steve's book he mentions how he parted ways with Charisma at a time when they even hired that complete charlatan Malcolm McLaren as a 'consultant'. It was the musical equivalent of the night of the long knives.

  17. #92
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
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    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from drug-addicts to complete nutcases.

  18. #93
    Quote Originally Posted by Trane View Post
    Always the way how I understood from the first time I sat down and heard the albums with the lyrics gatefold open on the first week it was out. But I didn't read it that the record label was saying it to the band, but rather thaty the band came to that idea themselves (and therefore took the time tto explain it to their fans)

    Not sure if the Beatles followed suit, rather than create them, though.

    Of course, it it wasn't for MTV, Asia wouldn't have sold neartly as many albums. Not that sure about Yes, though, for the sonic break was enormous between Tormato/Drama and 90125 (Owner of a Lonely Fart could've been a Duran track, for ex), much bigger than the sonic change between Danger Money and Asia's debut.
    Tony said the same thing many times.. they wanted to see how many different sounds they could get on a album..

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