Thread: What are you currently reading?

  1. #3151
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    Quote Originally Posted by headcrash View Post
    About halfway through Lenny Kaye's "Lightning Striking: Ten Transformative Moments in Rock & Roll", in which he documents and offers his unique perspective on many pivotal events in rock history, some well known (Beatles, Elvis) and some maybe not so well known (Professor Longhair, MC5). To me, Kaye's writing has always been a bit of an acquired taste: some passages seem to go on longer than they need (he's never met a semicolon he doesn't like). But here his style seems appropriate. And of course he's well qualified to chronicle the chapter on the NYC scene in 1975 as he was right in the middle of things. And there aren't many books around referencing both Joe Meek and Norwegian black metal.
    That sound interesting.

  2. #3152
    Picked up Keith Richards' "Life" for a buck at Goodwill.
    You say Mega Ultra Deluxe Special Limited Edition Extended Autographed 5-LP, 3-CD, 4-DVD, 2-BlueRay, 4-Cassette, five 8-Track, MP4 Download plus Demos, Outtakes, Booklet, T-Shirt and Guitar Pick Gold-Leafed Box Set Version like it's a bad thing...

  3. #3153
    Member Koreabruce's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Garden Dreamer View Post
    Picked up Keith Richards' "Life" for a buck at Goodwill.
    It's worth a buck, but it is far too long and rambling in places for me to give it any sort of great recommendation. I confess that I was never very much of a Stones fan, but I bought this on audiobook because I was very curious to know about the band's history, understanding that it's a history from the point-of-view of just one of the major players. The early years are indeed fascinating and constitute what is easily the best part of this book. Discussions of various album recording sessions are also of interest. Personally, I thought the book would have been greatly improved by including A LOT more of that and a lot LESS about his drug use and feud with Jagger. Things get severely bogged down in heroin-junkie land and all of Keith's associated run-ins with the law in the overly-long middle section, which makes for some depressing reading. What is amazing is that Keith's first son Marlon manages to come away relatively sane and unscathed considering all that transpired around him. The last part just sort of meanders around about random topics. Overall, there are some truly great stories to be had from this, and again, it's certainly $1.00 well spent, but I recommend dipping in rather than attempting a cover-to-cover read. There is far more chaff than wheat.

  4. #3154
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    Quote Originally Posted by Koreabruce View Post
    It's worth a buck, but it is far too long and rambling in places for me to give it any sort of great recommendation. I confess that I was never very much of a Stones fan, but I bought this on audiobook because I was very curious to know about the band's history, understanding that it's a history from the point-of-view of just one of the major players. The early years are indeed fascinating and constitute what is easily the best part of this book. Discussions of various album recording sessions are also of interest. Personally, I thought the book would have been greatly improved by including A LOT more of that and a lot LESS about his drug use and feud with Jagger. Things get severely bogged down in heroin-junkie land and all of Keith's associated run-ins with the law in the overly-long middle section, which makes for some depressing reading. What is amazing is that Keith's first son Marlon manages to come away relatively sane and unscathed considering all that transpired around him. The last part just sort of meanders around about random topics. Overall, there are some truly great stories to be had from this, and again, it's certainly $1.00 well spent, but I recommend dipping in rather than attempting a cover-to-cover read. There is far more chaff than wheat.
    Interesting take. Personally, I really enjoyed the book. Yes, it rambled at times, but what else would you expect from a Richard's biography. I have also read Bill Wyman's "Stone Alone" and several other books on the Stones. I thought Richard's book was a nice companion piece to those other works.

  5. #3155
    Member Jerjo's Avatar
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    Keith was the absolute epitome of the unreliable narrator but damn, there were some great stories buried in that book.
    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  6. #3156
    Member BobM's Avatar
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    Continuing on with Jack Reacher - Without Fail
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    A gentleman is defined as someone who knows how to play the accordion, and doesn't.

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  8. #3158
    Lost Illusions, by Balzac (in Kathleen Raine's translation). Admired by many as the supreme achievement of Balzac's "human comedy", into which I've been recently dipping my toes.

  9. #3159
    Quote Originally Posted by MortSahlFan View Post
    The Unauthorized Biography of James Pankow
    Was not aware of this. (Goes and looks.) Oh, and Bobby Lamm has a book! That goes onto Mt. TBR right next to Seraphine's book.
    If a bird can speak, who once was a dinosaur,
    and a dog can dream
    should it be impossible
    that a man might supervise the construction of light?

  10. #3160
    3 members of Chicago have books out? I gotta get up to speed!
    You say Mega Ultra Deluxe Special Limited Edition Extended Autographed 5-LP, 3-CD, 4-DVD, 2-BlueRay, 4-Cassette, five 8-Track, MP4 Download plus Demos, Outtakes, Booklet, T-Shirt and Guitar Pick Gold-Leafed Box Set Version like it's a bad thing...

  11. #3161
    Man of repute progmatist's Avatar
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    I'm reading Dickens' David Copperfield. Still waiting for the part where he makes the Statue of Liberty disappear.
    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"--Dalai Lama

  12. #3162
    Quote Originally Posted by Garden Dreamer View Post
    3 members of Chicago have books out? I gotta get up to speed!
    Two. The Pankow is an unauthorized biography by someone called Bill Fleck. I've glanced at it, it looks like it's probably worth the $2.99 for the Kindle edition. The other two are must-haves.
    If a bird can speak, who once was a dinosaur,
    and a dog can dream
    should it be impossible
    that a man might supervise the construction of light?

  13. #3163
    Quote Originally Posted by progmatist View Post
    I'm reading Dickens' David Copperfield. Still waiting for the part where he makes the Statue of Liberty disappear.
    If a bird can speak, who once was a dinosaur,
    and a dog can dream
    should it be impossible
    that a man might supervise the construction of light?

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