Thread: What are you currently reading?

  1. #2826
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    Currently reading "VJ The Unplugged Adventures Of MTV's First Wave". Anyone who grew up with MTV in the 80's would probably dig this book. It is basically a series of interviews with the original MTV VJ's and their time working for the network. One of the cool things is that often you can look up their stories on YouTube and watch them. I just got to a part of the book where they talked about Nina Blackwood's disaster of an interview with Frank Zappa which almost destroyed her career. It is cool to be able to go on YouTube and watch Frank basically just tear her apart on the air. The book is very interesting so far, with a lot of great stories of the era.

  2. #2827
    The Lamplighters, by Emma Stonex.

    A reimagining of the disappearance of three lighthouse keepers from the Eilean Mor lighthouse off the Outer Hebrides, the subject of a poem by Wilfred Gibson that will be known to all folk schooled in Scotland: https://allpoetry.com/Flannan-Isle

    The novel moves the mystery forward by a little under a century, & down to the far southwest of Cornwall.

    Joins the tradition going back through Jeff VanderMeer's Annihilation trilogy to A Plague of Lighthouse Keepers...
    Last edited by per anporth; 07-13-2021 at 03:02 PM.

  3. #2828
    All Things Must Pass spellbound's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveSly View Post
    Currently reading "VJ The Unplugged Adventures Of MTV's First Wave". Anyone who grew up with MTV in the 80's would probably dig this book. It is basically a series of interviews with the original MTV VJ's and their time working for the network. One of the cool things is that often you can look up their stories on YouTube and watch them. I just got to a part of the book where they talked about Nina Blackwood's disaster of an interview with Frank Zappa which almost destroyed her career. It is cool to be able to go on YouTube and watch Frank basically just tear her apart on the air. The book is very interesting so far, with a lot of great stories of the era.
    There are entire generations that probably don't know MTV used to feature music and musicians.

  4. #2829
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    Quote Originally Posted by spellbound View Post
    There are entire generations that probably don't know MTV used to feature music and musicians.
    Very true. How times have changed......

  5. #2830
    Studmuffin Scott Bails's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveSly View Post
    C I just got to a part of the book where they talked about Nina Blackwood's disaster of an interview with Frank Zappa which almost destroyed her career. It is cool to be able to go on YouTube and watch Frank basically just tear her apart on the air. The book is very interesting so far, with a lot of great stories of the era.
    I had to search this out. Steve is spot-on.

    Music isn't about chops, or even about talent - it's about sound and the way that sound communicates to people. Mike Keneally

  6. #2831
    Quote Originally Posted by Lopez View Post
    My son recently was asking about the 1964-1965 New York World's Fair. I pulled out the Guide Book for it my mom bought when we went there in the summer of 64. The Guide Book is still in excellent shape. I've been reading the descriptions of the exhibits. So many memories of the fair are coming back. What a great memory trip. The fair was fantastic and very futuristic. A lot of the stuff the fair anticipated came true, such as driver-less cars (well, sort of) and television phones. Stuff like colonization of the ocean floor and the Moon never happened. The book has a lot of ads in it for Japanese electronic companies. At that time, most anything labeled "Made in Japan" was considered cheap. I guess those companies in their ads were trying to dispel that notion.
    Gadzooks, Lou, I remember that Fair with such fondness and good memories. To this day my family is mystified that every time we visit Disneyland I have to ride "It's a Small World", not only for a long relaxing bit of air conditioning, but because when I am on that ride I am six years old and at the NYWF.

    Oh, and the wonders of the past and future, and of so many different countries ... I suspect there must be something racist in me that remembers the African dancers so well ... I think if I had a time machine and could go to any one thing from my past, this would be it.

    I would positively kill for a copy of that guidebook.

    Waitaminnit.

    Just found one on ABE books for $7 plus shipping. Bingo!

    Thanks for prompting me to go look for it!
    National Flat Earth Society: The only thing we have to fear, is sphere itself.

  7. #2832
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lopez View Post
    My son recently was asking about the 1964-1965 New York World's Fair. I pulled out the Guide Book for it my mom bought when we went there in the summer of 64. The Guide Book is still in excellent shape. I've been reading the descriptions of the exhibits. So many memories of the fair are coming back. What a great memory trip. The fair was fantastic and very futuristic. A lot of the stuff the fair anticipated came true, such as driver-less cars (well, sort of) and television phones. Stuff like colonization of the ocean floor and the Moon never happened. The book has a lot of ads in it for Japanese electronic companies. At that time, most anything labeled "Made in Japan" was considered cheap. I guess those companies in their ads were trying to dispel that notion.
    My wife has her copy from when she went with her dad! [emoji106]

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  8. #2833
    Member wideopenears's Avatar
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    Reading Elegant People, the Weather Report book by Curt Bianchi. Great, so far....
    "And this is the chorus.....or perhaps it's a bridge...."

  9. #2834
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Bails View Post
    I had to search this out. Steve is spot-on.
    ]
    That is a good one, but not the interview I was talking about with Nina Blackwood. It gets really cringe worthy around the 3:30 mark Here it is:

    Frank: Jump up and down for me.

    Nina: I thought you were a nice guy.

    Frank: Who told you that?

    Last edited by SteveSly; 07-13-2021 at 11:56 PM.

  10. #2835
    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Bails View Post
    I had to search this out. Steve is spot-on.

    It's a good interview, thanks for posting it Scott.


    Quote Originally Posted by SteveSly View Post
    That is a good one, but not the interview I was talking about with Nina Blackwood.
    Yeah, quite a bit different. I think Frank was pretty nice and down to earth in this one. Even though he makes it clear he's not a fan of MTV (or the music business as a whole), he's not being mean to the lady interviewing him.

    The one with Nina Blackwood on the other hand, yes that is cringeworthy.

  11. #2836
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    Quote Originally Posted by aith01 View Post

    The one with Nina Blackwood on the other hand, yes that is cringeworthy.
    In the book Nina talks about how this was one of her first ever interviews and she had no clue what she was doing. Some of the other VJ's comment that Frank sized her up right from the beginning as someone who was wet behind the ears who had very little knowledge about him or his music, so he pounced on her. It almost killed her career. She was moved to the overnight shift on MTV and pulled out of several promo spots and other extra activities after the interview and came very close to being fired.

  12. #2837
    Studmuffin Scott Bails's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveSly View Post
    In the book Nina talks about how this was one of her first ever interviews and she had no clue what she was doing. Some of the other VJ's comment that Frank sized her up right from the beginning as someone who was wet behind the ears who had very little knowledge about him or his music, so he pounced on her. It almost killed her career. She was moved to the overnight shift on MTV and pulled out of several promo spots and other extra activities after the interview and came very close to being fired.
    Wow. Never heard about that before.
    Music isn't about chops, or even about talent - it's about sound and the way that sound communicates to people. Mike Keneally

  13. #2838
    Member since March 2004 mozo-pg's Avatar
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    Peter Gabriel - Global Citizen (Paul Hegarty)
    What can this strange device be? When I touch it, it brings forth a sound.

  14. #2839
    Member Lopez's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sturgeon's Lawyer View Post
    Gadzooks, Lou, I remember that Fair with such fondness and good memories. To this day my family is mystified that every time we visit Disneyland I have to ride "It's a Small World", not only for a long relaxing bit of air conditioning, but because when I am on that ride I am six years old and at the NYWF.

    Oh, and the wonders of the past and future, and of so many different countries ... I suspect there must be something racist in me that remembers the African dancers so well ... I think if I had a time machine and could go to any one thing from my past, this would be it.

    I would positively kill for a copy of that guidebook.

    Waitaminnit.

    Just found one on ABE books for $7 plus shipping. Bingo!

    Thanks for prompting me to go look for it!
    I'm sure you'll enjoy reminiscing about the fair as I am. It was quite magical for me. I was 10. My mom, who is still with us, went to the 1939 New York World's Fair, titled The World of Tomorrow. She was 7 at the time and was quite amazed at what was presented then. I found some original guide books for that fair on Ebay, but I'll pass as either they are really beat or really expensive.

    I'm originally from Rhode Island, and we, of course, had to visit the RI exhibit at the fair. There wasn't much to it, but there was a computer that, I think sponsored by a RI insurance company, would tell you when you were going to die. No matter how many times I punched in my information, it said I was going to die at 68. I'm sure it was just going by actuarial tables for the time, but the day I turn 69, in 16 months, will be the happiest day of my life.
    Last edited by Lopez; 07-16-2021 at 10:18 AM.
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  15. #2840
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    My visit to the NY World's Fair in 1964 was a class trip with my elementary school from NJ. I remember the "It's A Small World" exhibit and the massive Unisphere, but the thing that made the greatest impression was the sight of the brand new Shea Stadium just across the highway, sporting those huge orange and blue metal squares on the outside.
    No matter how corrupt, greedy, and heartless our government, our corporations, our media, and our religious and charitable institutions may become, the music will still be wonderful. - Kurt Vonnegut

  16. #2841
    Member Koreabruce's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Bails View Post
    I had to search this out. Steve is spot-on.

    Seriously, how can you not love this man? From 16:13~17:16:

    “Let’s look at it realistically. If a person likes music, that is not enough in the 80s. You can like music and you can play music; you can sing, you can dance, you can have all these things going for you, but you’re not even going to get to first base unless you have science fiction hair and diagonal zippers on your clothes. Forget it. You go to a record company to make a deal, and the first thing they’re gonna do it look at your publicity picture. If they don’t like that, they won’t even listen to the tape. In fact, they don’t even care about the tape because they can always get Trevor Horn to fix it. And so after Trevor has fixed it and they’ve approved your publicity photo, then you get the video treatment and everything gets formulated according to the Warner Brothers aesthetic and goes on to MTV and goes on to any other competitor that hasn’t been bought by MTV yet, and the group gets exactly one chance to do one thing. And their, um, musical lifespan is in direct proportion to the interest that the audience has to the way they look… because the whole thing is based on the visual merchandising. So, what happened to music?”

  17. #2842
    Quote Originally Posted by Koreabruce View Post
    Seriously, how can you not love this man? From 16:13~17:16:

    “Let’s look at it realistically. If a person likes music, that is not enough in the 80s. You can like music and you can play music; you can sing, you can dance, you can have all these things going for you, but you’re not even going to get to first base unless you have science fiction hair and diagonal zippers on your clothes. Forget it. [...] So, what happened to music?”
    Yes, exactly.

  18. #2843
    All Things Must Pass spellbound's Avatar
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    I did not attend the 1964 World's Fair in New York. But my parents did take us kids to the Seattle World's Fair in 1962. So I did get to experience one World's Fair, the one for which they built Seattle's famous Space Needle, as well as a monorail.

  19. #2844
    Washington Square, by Henry James.

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  21. #2846
    Member Koreabruce's Avatar
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    Apollo 8: The Thrilling Story of the First Mission to the Moon by Jeffrey Kluger.

  22. #2847
    Stories for Chip, a festschrift for Samuel R. Delany
    National Flat Earth Society: The only thing we have to fear, is sphere itself.

  23. #2848
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    Just started "Deep Under Cover" by Jack Barsky. It is written by an East German who spied for the Soviet Union in the United States. I just finished watching the TV series "The Americans" so wanted to get a factual story about the spy game. So far this is a very interesting book.

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  25. #2850
    Felix Holt: The Radical, by George Eliot

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