Thread: What are you currently reading?

  1. #2101
    The Legacy by John Coyne (1937- )
    Published 1978

  2. #2102
    Just started Sara Collins' The Confessions Of Frannie Langton (2019)
    A "did she do it?" situated in London 1826.

  3. #2103
    Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway. Part of a multi-year project of reading her complete works in (roughly) chronological order. This is her first "masterpiece", and the first one I've found at all difficult to get into.
    Maka ki ecela tehani yanke lo!

  4. #2104
    Quote Originally Posted by Sturgeon's Lawyer View Post
    Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway. Part of a multi-year project of reading her complete works in (roughly) chronological order. This is her first "masterpiece", and the first one I've found at all difficult to get into.
    Whoa! You're at the beginning of a really spectacular four novel run.

    Difficult? Yep. Rewarding? Yes. In my opinion, the resplendent prose of modernists like Woolf, Faulkner, Forster, Joyce, Conrad, and Lawrence remains unsurpassed. Oh, there's Poe, Undset, Marquez, and a few others, but still...

  5. #2105
    The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling by Henry Fielding (1707-1754)
    Published 1749

  6. #2106
    Member Lou's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Cincinnati-ish
    Posts
    1,513
    The Road to Mars by Eric Idle

    Sci fi novel set in the year 2300. A comedy duo is desperately trying to get to Mars (where are the good clubs are). Aided by their humanoid Carlton, who is
    modeled after David Bowie. Danger, suspense, hijinks, and lots of laughs. This is brilliant!
    A Comfort Zone is not a Life Sentence

  7. #2107
    Quote Originally Posted by Lou View Post
    The Road to Mars by Eric Idle

    Sci fi novel set in the year 2300. A comedy duo is desperately trying to get to Mars (where are the good clubs are). Aided by their humanoid Carlton, who is
    modeled after David Bowie. Danger, suspense, hijinks, and lots of laughs. This is brilliant!
    If I remember correctly, there was a promotional quote from Steve Martin on the back cover that says something like: "I laughed. I cried. Then I read the book." -Steve Martin


  8. #2108
    Member Lou's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Cincinnati-ish
    Posts
    1,513
    Quote Originally Posted by aith01 View Post
    If I remember correctly, there was a promotional quote from Steve Martin on the back cover that says something like: "I laughed. I cried. Then I read the book." -Steve Martin

    You are correct sir!
    A Comfort Zone is not a Life Sentence

  9. #2109
    Member Koreabruce's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Chuncheon, South Korea
    Posts
    866
    Quote Originally Posted by Lou View Post
    The Road to Mars by Eric Idle

    Sci fi novel set in the year 2300. A comedy duo is desperately trying to get to Mars (where are the good clubs are). Aided by their humanoid Carlton, who is
    modeled after David Bowie. Danger, suspense, hijinks, and lots of laughs. This is brilliant!
    I read that one back in the early 2000s. Great book! Idle is obviously a very witty wordsmith and storyteller.

  10. #2110
    Member Joe F.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Bothell, Washington
    Posts
    243
    Quote Originally Posted by rcarlberg View Post
    Yup, the Vonnegut world is worth spending a few months inhabiting. I recommend:
    • Cat's Cradle
    • Breakfast of Champions
    • Slapstick
    • Galapagos
    • Hocus Pocus
    • Timequake
    • Welcome to the Monkeyhouse
    • Wapeters, Foma and Granfalloons
    I would add Mother Night and God Bless You Mr. Rosewater to that list.

  11. #2111
    While a translation of Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle lies waiting to be read, I'm working my way through Kathryn Kalinak's Film Music: A Very Short Introduction (2010).
    This can be tough stuff, but Kalinak knows how to reach the reader, by starting to explain why Stuck In The Middle With You worked so well in Reservoir Dogs.

  12. #2112
    Now on my Kindle: The History Of The Hobbit, a presentation of and commentary on the drafts of Tolkien's book.
    Maka ki ecela tehani yanke lo!

  13. #2113
    The Nightwalker by Thomas Tessier (1947- )
    Published 1979

  14. #2114
    Member Lopez's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Medford, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,525
    Quote Originally Posted by Crawford Glissadevil View Post
    The Nightwalker by Thomas Tessier (1947- )
    Published 1979
    Good stuff. I'm a big fan of TT's work.
    Last edited by Lopez; 09-24-2019 at 06:24 AM.
    Lou

    Awarded the Krusty Brand Seal of Approval. It's not just good, it's good enough.

  15. #2115
    Quote Originally Posted by interbellum View Post
    Just started Sara Collins' The Confessions Of Frannie Langton (2019)
    A "did she do it?" situated in London 1826.
    Didn't do much justice to the book with this last line. Although the novel is about a trial, the real story is about slavery and racism.

  16. #2116
    Although I read gobs great literature, I must feed my horror fetish. I buy horror books in bulk lots off Ebay. I have several boxes of unread novels. A few days ago, I started "Power of Six" by Pitticus Lore. I threw in the towel after 50 pages. Couldn't read it anymore, because it felt juvenile. At age 10, I would have finished the the book. Unbeknownst to me, "Power of Six" is the 2nd novel in a sci-fi, young adult series. I'm not the target audience. Not the books fault...probably.

    I always feel a slight feeling of displeasure with myself, when I give up on a novel. Does that happen to you?
    What books thwarted your best efforts to finish? Why? Did you feel displeasure with yourself?
    Last edited by Crawford Glissadevil; 09-26-2019 at 10:45 AM.

  17. #2117
    Member Lopez's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Medford, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,525
    I used to feel the same way. The first time I quit a book was about 30 years ago, I started the supposed sci-fi "classic" A Voyage to Arcturus by David Lindsay. Man, what a snoozer. I got about 50 pages in and decided, nope, this is not doing it for me. So I stopped. I had bought the book, so there's the double whammy. Quitting a book and having paid for it. There are so many books out there that I want to read, that I'll stop a quarter of the way in if I'm not being entertained on some level. I want a good story first. If it's got symbolism and all that literary crap, so much the better. Heck, Moby-Dick is loaded with literary crap, but it's a damn great story. Too many books, not enough time.
    Lou

    Awarded the Krusty Brand Seal of Approval. It's not just good, it's good enough.

  18. #2118
    @Lopez: I'm sorry you had that experience with Voyage to Arcturus; it's a favorite of mine. Perhaps you were too young for it? I certainly didn't "get" it until I was in my 40s!

    At any rate, it's intentionally surreal, which means "not for everyone", so maybe it just isn't for you.
    Maka ki ecela tehani yanke lo!

  19. #2119
    facetious maximus Yves's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    1,600
    Gotta love iBooks. I am reading a trilogy that is not sold as a bundle. I paid 8.99 for book 1, 1.99 for book 2, but they want 16.99 for book 3! They're like pushers once they got you hooked....
    "Corn Flakes pissed in. You ranted. Mission accomplished. Thread closed."

    -Cozy 3:16-

  20. #2120
    Member Lopez's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Medford, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,525
    Quote Originally Posted by Sturgeon's Lawyer View Post
    @Lopez: I'm sorry you had that experience with Voyage to Arcturus; it's a favorite of mine. Perhaps you were too young for it? I certainly didn't "get" it until I was in my 40s!

    At any rate, it's intentionally surreal, which means "not for everyone", so maybe it just isn't for you.
    Now I'm intrigued. I'll have to give it another try.
    Lou

    Awarded the Krusty Brand Seal of Approval. It's not just good, it's good enough.

  21. #2121
    [QUOTE=Sturgeon's Lawyer;929011]@Lopez: I'm sorry you had that experience with Voyage to Arcturus; it's a favorite of mine. Perhaps you were too young for it? I certainly didn't "get" it until I was in my 40s!

    At any rate, it's intentionally surreal, which means "not for everyone", so maybe it just isn't for you.[/QUOT I don't think I would have got it at age 10.





    I read it and liked it. It would have baffled me at age 10 too.


    Ghosts by Noel Hynd (1952- )
    Pubished 1993
    Last edited by Crawford Glissadevil; 09-27-2019 at 06:38 AM.

  22. #2122
    Quote Originally Posted by interbellum View Post
    Very funny, but also at times sad book by Mark Haddon (who recently published a new book called The Porpoise. (Haven't read that one yet, but it's on the pile of recently bought new books.)

    B.t.w. some years ago The Curious Incident (...) was addapted to a stage play.

    Finally started reading Haddon's The Porpoise. Well, he sure knows how to catch the attention of the reader right from the beginning. And he also knows how to change the atmosphere in one sentence. Curious how this will lead to.

  23. #2123
    The Complete Short Stories of Ambrose Bierce
    (1842- 1914)

  24. #2124
    All Things Must Pass spellbound's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Eastern Sierra
    Posts
    1,637
    How To: Absurd Scientific Advice For Common Real-World Problems, by Randall Munroe, who also does this:


  25. #2125
    Quote Originally Posted by Crawford Glissadevil View Post
    I always feel a slight feeling of displeasure with myself, when I give up on a novel. Does that happen to you?
    What books thwarted your best efforts to finish? Why? Did you feel displeasure with yourself?
    The only time I can recall that happening to me was with Peter F. Hamilton’s The Reality Dysfunction. A fascinating concept for a sci-fi story that blended some strong horror elements. But after a couple hundred pages probably, I stopped. The cast of characters was really large, and none of them were likable. Not even the “protagonist”, a young stud starship captain who proceeded to bed every single female he encountered.

    Between the gratuitous sex, and the lack of any likable (or even just decent) people, I couldn’t take anymore. It just became an ugly, unpleasant slog for me. It was unfortunate, because I’d read some of Hamilton’s later books and really enjoyed them.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •