Thread: What are you currently reading?

  1. #2076
    Pikachupacabra spellbound's Avatar
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    Here's Joe's website.

    http://www.joerlansdale.com/
    Can this be the swan song? The final elbow?

  2. #2077
    Currently on the Kindle: Virginia Woolf's first series of "The Common Reader." Interesting essays on old books, pretty much none of which I have read or intend to...
    Maka ki ecela tehani yanke lo!

  3. #2078
    For All the Tea in China: How England Stole the World's Favorite Drink and Changed History
    Fascinating read.. especially if you partake of a cuppa' now and then..

  4. #2079
    Now up on the Kindle: The God Particle, by Nobel prize winner Leon Lederman.
    Maka ki ecela tehani yanke lo!

  5. #2080
    I'm in the middle of The Silent Patient by Alex Michaelides. My wife urged me to read it. Nice story, which runs of course to a who done it?

  6. #2081
    Boo! walt's Avatar
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    Just started "How To Be An Antiracist" by Ibram X. Kendi.I recently read a feature article about Kendi in The New Yorker and bought his book based on that article.
    "please do not understand me too quickly"-andre gide

  7. #2082
    I'm here for the moosic NogbadTheBad's Avatar
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    Paul Sears' book Angels & Demons That Play.
    Ian

    I blame Wynton, what was the question?
    There are only 10 types of people in the World, those who understand binary and those that don't.

  8. #2083
    Member Lopez's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NogbadTheBad View Post
    Paul Sears' book Angels & Demons That Play.
    That's on deck for me.

    Currently, I'm reading a recent Hard Case Crime release, A Bloody Business, by Dylan Struzan. It's a monster tome, over 600 pages; a novelization of the beginnings of organized crime in America, the key players being Meyer Lansky, Charlie Luciano, and Benny Siegel, all just teenagers. Yeah, I know it's been done before, but I'm enjoying it.
    Lou

    Awarded the Krusty Brand Seal of Approval. It's not just good, it's good enough.

  9. #2084
    Member Zeuhlmate's Avatar
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    Convenience Store Woman by Sayaka Murata

  10. #2085
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    Quote Originally Posted by NogbadTheBad View Post
    Paul Sears' book Angels & Demons That Play.
    Paul's book is a fun read.

  11. #2086
    The Stepford Wives by Ira Levin (1929-2007)
    Published 1972
    Last edited by Crawford Glissadevil; 1 Week Ago at 07:55 PM.

  12. #2087
    Pikachupacabra spellbound's Avatar
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    Re-reading Cat's Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr., now that the end of the world is fast approaching.
    Can this be the swan song? The final elbow?

  13. #2088
    Quote Originally Posted by spellbound View Post
    Re-reading Cat's Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr., now that the end of the world is fast approaching.
    I have a hypothesis... Writer/Director, Richard Kelly modeled Donny Darko after Cat's Cradle.

  14. #2089
    Member Emeritus (A.M.P.) rcarlberg's Avatar
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    Lately I've been reading a lot of super-short short stories (1-3 pages). Back in 1982 I read and enjoyed a collection (by Howe and Howe) called "Short Shorts" and after finishing last month a 500-page novel by Connie Willis ("Crosstalk," it actually went pretty fast) I decided to treat myself to some short attention span reading. This genre is now called "flash fiction" and there's a ton of it out. I read an international compilation and I'm on my third American compilation. Like anything else some of the stories are meh, some are pretty good and some are jaw droppingly good.

  15. #2090
    Quote Originally Posted by spellbound View Post
    Re-reading Cat's Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr., now that the end of the world is fast approaching.
    Quote Originally Posted by Crawford Glissadevil View Post
    I have a hypothesis... Writer/Director, Richard Kelly modeled Donny Darko after Cat's Cradle.
    After reading The Universe Versus Alex Woods by Gavin Extence, which has Vonnegut all over it, and these two remarks, I really should invest some more in him. Besides his most read Slaughterhouse Five I haven't read anything by him. And I love Donny Darko!

  16. #2091
    Member Emeritus (A.M.P.) rcarlberg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by interbellum View Post
    Besides Slaughterhouse Five I haven't read anything by him.
    Yup, the Vonnegut world is worth spending a few months inhabiting. I recommend:
    • Cat's Cradle
    • Breakfast of Champions
    • Slapstick
    • Galapagos
    • Hocus Pocus
    • Timequake
    • Welcome to the Monkeyhouse
    • Wapeters, Foma and Granfalloons

  17. #2092
    ^^thanks for the recommendations. Don't know if some of them are translated into Dutch, so maybe I have to go for the originals.

  18. #2093
    Quote Originally Posted by NogbadTheBad View Post
    Paul Sears' book Angels & Demons That Play.
    I'm also reading that now.

  19. #2094
    Quote Originally Posted by rcarlberg View Post
    Yup, the Vonnegut world is worth spending a few months inhabiting. I recommend:
    • Cat's Cradle
    • Breakfast of Champions
    • Slapstick
    • Galapagos
    • Hocus Pocus
    • Timequake
    • Welcome to the Monkeyhouse
    • Wapeters, Foma and Granfalloons


    Fantastic list. Allow me to add "Sirens of Titan". I named my dog after Kazak , the Chrono-Synclastic Infundibulated space hound. Kazak also appears in Galápagos and Breakfast of Champions as a Doberman pinscher, a vicious guard dog which attacks Kurt's character.

  20. #2095
    Quote Originally Posted by rcarlberg View Post
    Yup, the Vonnegut world is worth spending a few months inhabiting. I recommend:
    • Cat's Cradle
    • Breakfast of Champions
    • Slapstick
    • Galapagos
    • Hocus Pocus
    • Timequake
    • Welcome to the Monkeyhouse
    • Wapeters, Foma and Granfalloons
    I ordered a second hand copy of a translation of Cat's Cradle. It seems a lot of his books got a translation, although most of them are out of stock, so you have to go for the second hand market, which offers plenty.

  21. #2096
    Member Lou's Avatar
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    The Midnight Book Club Super Box Set

    Almost 600 pages of horror, in short stories and short novels by Jeremy Bates. Bates is a gifted author. I've previously read a half dozen of his
    books and have enjoyed them all. This is quite good as well. Highly recommended!
    A Comfort Zone is not a Life Sentence

  22. #2097
    I would honestly say that Vonnegut's masterpiece is Mother Night, which you did not list. It is the story of a man who committed (technically) war crimes (broadcasting pro-Nazi propaganda) as part of being a US spy in Germany during WWII. But his role as a spy is secret, so he is considered a war criminal, and the Nazi-hunters find him, and...
    Maka ki ecela tehani yanke lo!

  23. #2098
    Pikachupacabra spellbound's Avatar
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    They made a movie of Mother Night, which I have seen. Good one; worth seeing if you can track it down. 1996 film starring Nick Nolte.

    IIRC, Vonnegut has a cameo appearance.
    Can this be the swan song? The final elbow?

  24. #2099
    Yes, excellent film. I would read the book first though.
    Maka ki ecela tehani yanke lo!

  25. #2100
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    I have been reading the new book on Crosby Stills Nash & Young by David Browne. I am really enjoying it as it really covers a lot of ground in great detail. I had ready both of Crosby's books, Young's book, and Nash's book all of which are great, but this one sums up the whole story from all of the different perspectives. If you are into this "band" at all you would probably find it a good read.

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