Thread: What are you currently reading?

  1. #2176
    Finished that, now reading Cherie Priest's new(ish) The Toll. Southern Gothic with a serious atmosphere of dread (so far).
    Maka ki ecela tehani yanke lo!

  2. #2177
    Member Lopez's Avatar
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    I've been getting into old pulp novels lately such as those by Charles Willeford, Jim Thompson, and the like. Doing so I've discovered 50s pulp novels written by women, sometimes under a pseudonym. I'm currently reading Bunny Lake Is Missing by Evelyn Piper. It's about a young single mother who is waiting for her 3-year-old to be returned to her after the girl's first day at nursery school; only the girl never shows up, and the mother is convinced the toddler is in the locked school. I'm not too far into the book yet, and the back cover suggests mom might be crazy and there is no little girl. A movie was made of the book in the early 60s, but I'll stay away until after I finish reading.
    Lou

    Awarded the Krusty Brand Seal of Approval. It's not just good, it's good enough.

  3. #2178
    Member Emeritus (A.M.P.) rcarlberg's Avatar
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    "Permanent Record" by Edward Snowden.

    No matter what you think of Snowden and what he did -- Susan Rice for one has no kind words -- this book is extremely well written. It's factual and matter-of-fact, it's self-deprecating, it's surprising and it's funny as hell. Who knew Snowden was such a good writer?

  4. #2179
    Pikachupacabra spellbound's Avatar
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    Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel

    No matter what you think of Snowden and what he did -- Susan Rice for one has no kind words -- this book is extremely well written. It's factual and matter-of-fact, it's self-deprecating, it's surprising and it's funny as hell. Who knew Snowden was such a good writer?
    There are a surprising number of very smart people who have been screwed over by the establishment, sometimes for their political views, sometimes as part of the dumbing-down of America.
    Can this be the swan song? The final elbow?

  5. #2180
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    Quote Originally Posted by rcarlberg View Post
    "Permanent Record" by Edward Snowden.

    No matter what you think of Snowden and what he did -- Susan Rice for one has no kind words -- this book is extremely well written. It's factual and matter-of-fact, it's self-deprecating, it's surprising and it's funny as hell. Who knew Snowden was such a good writer?
    That sounds interesting. May have to pick it up.

  6. #2181
    Based On A True Story by Norm MacDonald

  7. #2182
    Quote Originally Posted by Lopez View Post
    I've been getting into old pulp novels lately such as those by Charles Willeford, Jim Thompson, and the like. Doing so I've discovered 50s pulp novels written by women, sometimes under a pseudonym. I'm currently reading Bunny Lake Is Missing by Evelyn Piper. It's about a young single mother who is waiting for her 3-year-old to be returned to her after the girl's first day at nursery school; only the girl never shows up, and the mother is convinced the toddler is in the locked school. I'm not too far into the book yet, and the back cover suggests mom might be crazy and there is no little girl. A movie was made of the book in the early 60s, but I'll stay away until after I finish reading.
    Love me some Jim Thompson. The Killer Inside Me gave me the creeps. Excellent novel! I didn't know the movie Bunny Lake is Missing was based on a novel. If the novel is better than the movie, than it's a must read. We'll approach the Bunny Lake mystery from opposite directions. You look for clues in the book...I'll start with the...

  8. #2183
    Last night started M.R. James's Ghost Stories of an Antiquary. Deliberately paced, non-splattery horror. This will take me past the Hallowe'en reading season
    Maka ki ecela tehani yanke lo!

  9. #2184
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    Quote Originally Posted by arabicadabra View Post
    Based On A True Story by Norm MacDonald
    I read that one. Much of it is hilarious, but if you are looking for an accurate autobiography, this ain't it.

  10. #2185
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    I am reading a biography of Evel Knievel called “Evel The High-Flying Life Of Evel Knievel Showman Daredevil & Legend”. It came out in 2012 and is really interesting. I was all in on Knievel when I was a kid, so I remember everything in the book. In reality the guy was kind of an asshole. Although there is no doubt that the guy had balls of steel, he was also a carnival huckster who was a master at media manipulation. He was a probable alcoholic (he made many of his jumps totally shitfaced), womanizer, bully, and spent money as fast as he got it. The whole thing is pretty fascinating and there are many interviews with prominent people in Evel’s life. Anyway, I am enjoying it. I am right up to the point where he does the Snake River jump.

  11. #2186
    Member Lopez's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crawford Glissadevil View Post
    Love me some Jim Thompson. The Killer Inside Me gave me the creeps. Excellent novel!
    Have you read his Pop. 1280? It's similar to The Killer Inside Me but with a totally psychopathic sheriff whom everyone loves. I remember in a Stephen King movie when the main characters are driving into town, they pass a welcoming sign for the town that says "Pop. 1280." I know King's a fan.
    Lou

    Awarded the Krusty Brand Seal of Approval. It's not just good, it's good enough.

  12. #2187
    Quote Originally Posted by Lopez View Post
    Have you read his Pop. 1280? It's similar to The Killer Inside Me but with a totally psychopathic sheriff whom everyone loves. I remember in a Stephen King movie when the main characters are driving into town, they pass a welcoming sign for the town that says "Pop. 1280." I know King's a fan.
    Nope. I haven't read Pop. 1280...yet. You just put it on my list.

    Outstanding King, Easter egg find!

  13. #2188
    Quote Originally Posted by interbellum View Post
    Yesterday I started reading The Testaments by Margaret Atwood. It's more or less a sequel to The Handmaids Tale, although written from other perspectives. Just noticed she won the Booker Prize 2019 for this novel.
    After finishing The Testaments I found a copy of the graphic novel that was made from The Handmaids Tail. A fine way to remind me of that book and the story as a whole:


  14. #2189
    Don't know that I'll read The Testaments. The original was quite bleak enough for me.
    Maka ki ecela tehani yanke lo!

  15. #2190
    Quote Originally Posted by Sturgeon's Lawyer View Post
    Don't know that I'll read The Testaments. The original was quite bleak enough for me.
    Somehow The Testaments is less dark. It plays 15 years after the original story, partly in Canada, partly in Gilead. It is told through the testaments of three women. First the stories don't seem to connect to each other, but slowly the events get connected.

  16. #2191
    Interesting. Still, I'll probably wait for the paperback.

    Meanwhile, on to another classic I've been meaning to read for years, Of Mice and Men. Very thin book but 20 pages in looks to be a heartbreaker.
    Maka ki ecela tehani yanke lo!

  17. #2192
    Occultation and Other Stories by Laird Barron (1970- )
    Published 2010

    Probably the cream of modern Lovecraftian horror authors. He was a 2007 and 2010 Shirley Jackson Award winner for his collections The Imago Sequence and Other Stories and Occultation and Other Stories. Barron raced the Alaskan Iditarod three times during the early 1990s, and worked as fisherman on the Bering Sea.

  18. #2193
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    Currently reading Bud Selig's autobiography "For The Good Of The Game". I would guess that most baseball fans would find this one interesting. I am only about half way through it, so have not hit the steroid era yet, but up to this point the book has been a very good read.

  19. #2194
    Michael Robotham: Good Girl, Bad Girl (2019).

    Robotham starts a new series with new characters, but after reading a couple of chapters I can say it's a typical Robotham-story, which is a good thing.

  20. #2195
    Boo! walt's Avatar
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    Most of the way through "The Weather Machine-A Journey Inside The Forecast" by Andrew Blum.I've enjoyed reading the history behind and the infrastructure of the everyday weather forecast.

    I'm Walt Mattes and i recommend this book.
    "please do not understand me too quickly"-andre gide

  21. #2196
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    Quote Originally Posted by walt View Post
    Most of the way through "The Weather Machine-A Journey Inside The Forecast" by Andrew Blum.I've enjoyed reading the history behind and the infrastructure of the everyday weather forecast.

    I'm Walt Mattes and i recommend this book.
    That sounds interesting. I will look into it.

  22. #2197
    Of Mice and Men was just astounding.

    And now for something completely different: The Surprising Adventures of Baron Munchausen by Rudolph Erich Raspe.
    Maka ki ecela tehani yanke lo!

  23. #2198
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    "What You Have Heard is True" by Carolyn Forche, poet and anthologist, etc.
    Harrowing memoir of the El Salvador situation in the seventies. Excellent book.
    "And this is the chorus.....or perhaps it's a bridge...."

  24. #2199
    Boo! walt's Avatar
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    Just started "The Music Instinct-How Music Works And Why We Can't Do Without It" by Philip Ball.A friend who shares my love for different musics urged me to read this.

    Ball writes clearly and avoids academic verbiage(so far).
    "please do not understand me too quickly"-andre gide

  25. #2200
    Munchausen started quite niftily but the second part descended into crud.

    Now reading Gene Wolfe's Book of the New Sun: A Chapter Guide, by Michael Andre-Driussi. For those who don't know, The Book of the New Sun is one of the genuine masterpieces of 20th-Century American science fiction. It's filled with allusions and quasiquotations and Michael (an acquaintance) has tracked down and identified huge numbers of them.
    Maka ki ecela tehani yanke lo!

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