Thread: What are you currently reading?

  1. #2126
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    Currently reading "Hollywood Godfather, My Life In The Movies And The Mob" by Gianni Russo. Russo is probably best known for playing Carlo in "The Godfather" movie, but has also been in more than 40 other films. He was also an associate of mob boss Frank Costello when he was young. He shot and killed a member of Pablo Escobar's cartel in the restaurant Russo owned, and had an affair with Marilyn Monroe. He has certainly led an interesting life.

  2. #2127
    Member Lopez's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveSly View Post
    Currently reading "Hollywood Godfather, My Life In The Movies And The Mob" by Gianni Russo. Russo is probably best known for playing Carlo in "The Godfather" movie, but has also been in more than 40 other films. He was also an associate of mob boss Frank Costello when he was young. He shot and killed a member of Pablo Escobar's cartel in the restaurant Russo owned, and had an affair with Marilyn Monroe. He has certainly led an interesting life.
    That's on my list after I finish a couple others.
    Lou

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  3. #2128
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lopez View Post
    That's on my list after I finish a couple others.
    If everything is true in this book, this guy has led one hell of a life.

  4. #2129
    Monastery Nightmare by Ross H. Spencer (1921-1998)
    Published 1986

    Mickey Spillane/Raymond Chandler style private detective novel. Extremely funny descriptions.

  5. #2130
    Just started Cherie Priest's The Agony House, about a teenager whose family moved out of Norleans to Houston after the flood. Now they (minus dad, who died in the flood; plus a newish stepdad) move back to the Easy to start a B&B in a house that has ... history. And a lot of rot and mould.
    Maka ki ecela tehani yanke lo!

  6. #2131
    Quote Originally Posted by Crawford Glissadevil View Post
    The Stepford Wives by Ira Levin (1929-2007)
    Published 1972
    I stole that and The Boys From Brazil from Mom a while back. Haven't read Stepford but it should be a good read. Just finished Good Omens as I can't watch the series and on deck is We Need to Talk About Kevin. Started a while back and never finished it. It's rather depressing.
    Carry On My Blood-Ejaculating Son - JKL2000

  7. #2132
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    I'm rereading "The Catcher In The Rye" for the first time since I was probably about Caulfield's age. It's a completely different experience, but then I guess everything experienced at 16 and then again at 62 probably would be. Still a great, great book.
    No matter how corrupt, greedy, and heartless our government, our corporations, our media, and our religious and charitable institutions may become, the music will still be wonderful. - Kurt Vonnegut

  8. #2133
    Quote Originally Posted by TheLoony View Post
    I stole that and The Boys From Brazil from Mom a while back. Haven't read Stepford but it should be a good read. Just finished Good Omens as I can't watch the series and on deck is We Need to Talk About Kevin. Started a while back and never finished it. It's rather depressing.
    Have not read "We Need to Talk About Kevin". Although the novel appears on a bunch of lists. I'm not so sure it's my kind of horror. I'm not into depressing. I considered Dostoyevsky's "Crime and Punishment" depressing horror. Super-human writing but it made me feel awful.

  9. #2134
    Member Jerjo's Avatar
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    Going Postal by Terry Prachett
    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  10. #2135
    I'm here for the moosic NogbadTheBad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerjo View Post
    Going Postal by Terry Prachett
    Great book, and not a bad show on Amazon Prime
    Ian

    I blame Wynton, what was the question?
    There are only 10 types of people in the World, those who understand binary and those that don't.

  11. #2136
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    End of Watch by Stephen King. Finally getting to the last of the Bill Hodges trilogy. Halfway in and not disappointed.
    A Comfort Zone is not a Life Sentence

  12. #2137
    Quote Originally Posted by Lou View Post
    End of Watch by Stephen King. Finally getting to the last of the Bill Hodges trilogy. Halfway in and not disappointed.
    The first one is on my to-read pile. The question is, do I want to buy the other two and have them on deck, or can I comfortably pause between them?
    Maka ki ecela tehani yanke lo!

  13. #2138
    Member Lou's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sturgeon's Lawyer View Post
    The first one is on my to-read pile. The question is, do I want to buy the other two and have them on deck, or can I comfortably pause between them?
    I had at least a year between each one. Even with a long time in between, it wasn't hard to pick it back up. King does a good job reminding you of the previous plots.
    A Comfort Zone is not a Life Sentence

  14. #2139
    The Djinn by Graham Masterton (1946- )
    Published 1977

    Masterton's was the editor of Penthouse Magazine. His first novel (The Manitou) was made into a movie in 1978, staring Tony Curtis and Susan Strasberg.

    Lou said- End of Watch by Stephen King. Finally getting to the last of the Bill Hodges trilogy. Halfway in and not disappointed.

    I've only read the first Bill Hodges book. I thoroughly enjoyed it, and need to purchase the remaining two.

  15. #2140
    Of interest: King talks about writing Mr. Mercedes a fair amount in this (long) speech/Q&A session:

    Maka ki ecela tehani yanke lo!

  16. #2141
    Oh, yeah. Now reading: A Night in the Lonesome October, by Roger Zelazny, illustrated by Gahan Wilson. I'm rereading this for the first time since it came out; it may be Zelazny's last masterpiece, and his writing matches Wilson's illustrations beautifully.
    Maka ki ecela tehani yanke lo!

  17. #2142
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    Someone posted a while back about the book "Blitzed Drugs In Nazi Germany". I just started reading it and am finding it very interesting so far. I have worked in the Pharma industry for 30 years and enjoyed reading about the origins and background of some of these drugs that have been around for years and were mostly developed by well known Pharma companies like Merck. I am only about a 3rd of the way into the book so far, but thanks for the recommendation.

  18. #2143
    Quote Originally Posted by Lopez View Post
    That's on deck for me.

    Currently, I'm reading a recent Hard Case Crime release, A Bloody Business, by Dylan Struzan. It's a monster tome, over 600 pages; a novelization of the beginnings of organized crime in America, the key players being Meyer Lansky, Charlie Luciano, and Benny Siegel, all just teenagers. Yeah, I know it's been done before, but I'm enjoying it.
    I picked this book up, after reading this note. I'm a big fan of the Hard Case imprint, & this sounded like an intriguing book. Sadly, I think the writing is poor. It's neither "pulp"y enough to fit with the "house style" of Hard Case, nor "experimental" enough to go the full Ellroy mile - so it's sort of fragmentary, & flat.

    I put it down after 100 or so pages, & am reading The Rift, Nina Allan's second novel - which has hooked me right from the off.

  19. #2144
    Member Lopez's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by per anporth View Post
    I picked this book up, after reading this note. I'm a big fan of the Hard Case imprint, & this sounded like an intriguing book. Sadly, I think the writing is poor. It's neither "pulp"y enough to fit with the "house style" of Hard Case, nor "experimental" enough to go the full Ellroy mile - so it's sort of fragmentary, & flat.
    At about 100 pages is where I tossed in the towel, too. You are correct that the writing is not that good, especially for a book that the writer supposedly worked on for 20 years. You'd think she or a good copyeditor would have sharpened it up. As for books about Lucky, Bugsy, and Meyer, there are plenty of non-fiction, true-life ones out there with more action and certainly better written.

    I've since moved on to Taking Woodstock by Elliot Tiber while my wife reads Hollywood Godfather by Gianni Russo, which Steve Sly recommended. She-who-must-be-obeyed is enjoying it, and she's hard to please. Even Joe Lansdale doesn't do much for her. The horror!
    Last edited by Lopez; 1 Week Ago at 07:46 AM.
    Lou

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  20. #2145
    I'm here for the moosic NogbadTheBad's Avatar
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    Paul Ferris - The Boy On The Shed, autobiography from an Irish football player who lived through "the troubles", was the youngest player to start for Newcastle United, had a career cut short by injury and became a physio. Very well written, interesting and entertaining.
    Ian

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    There are only 10 types of people in the World, those who understand binary and those that don't.

  21. #2146
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lopez View Post
    At about 100 pages is where I tossed in the towel, too. You are correct that the writing is not that good, especially for a book that the writer supposedly worked on for 20 years. You'd think she or a good copyeditor would have sharpened it up. As for books about Lucky, Bugsy, and Meyer, there are plenty of non-fiction, true-life ones out there with more action and certainly better written.

    I've since moved on to Taking Woodstock by Elliot Tiber while my wife reads Hollywood Godfather by Gianni Russo, which Steve Sly recommended. She-who-must-be-obeyed is enjoying it, and she's hard to please. Even Joe Lansdale doesn't do much for her. The horror!
    I finished "Hollywood Godfather". I am still not sure that I believe everything Russo says happened in the book. If everything is true, the guy lived one of the most interesting lives ever. I have seen critics of the book cite that almost everyone Russo claims to have had interactions with in the book are dead, so it is almost impossible to verify many of his claims. Some people call him a "wannabe" gangster, but who knows I guess. The book was certainly entertaining.

  22. #2147
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
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    Rick Wilson -Everything Trump Touches Dies, Updated.
    "If you want to see the true nature of humanity, just look at the internet."

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  23. #2148
    Larry Niven and David Gerrold, The Flying Sorcerers, a book I found hilarious in high school. We'll see what I think 40+ years later.
    Maka ki ecela tehani yanke lo!

  24. #2149
    Quick update - Nina Allan's The Rift is really outstanding. It works as SF, it works as a serious reflection on survivor guilt, on trauma, on personal identity, on how we relate to one another... & it does so through a variety of styles & texts, all of which are brilliantly rendered.

  25. #2150
    Yesterday I started reading The Testaments by Margaret Atwood. It's more or less a sequel to The Handmaids Tale, although written from other perspectives. Just noticed she won the Booker Prize 2019 for this novel.

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