Thread: What are you currently reading?

  1. #2051
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Kalamazoo Michigan
    Posts
    3,319
    Just started Todd Rungren's book. It is all written like a series of short snippets of his life, but so far I am enjoying it.

  2. #2052
    Quote Originally Posted by SteveSly View Post
    Just started Todd Rungren's book. It is all written like a series of short snippets of his life, but so far I am enjoying it.
    Nice. I finished it a few weeks ago; really enjoyed it, and learned a lot about the man that I had never known/read before. Certainly an interesting read.

  3. #2053
    Audrey's Door by Sarah Langan
    Published 2009

  4. #2054
    I'm about to start R.J. Ellory's Kings Of America about the early days in Hollywood (1937).

  5. #2055
    Reading a massive tome containing N.K. Jemisin's first fantasy trilogy ("The Inheritance Trilogy"), plus an additional novella. I may strain my back lifting it. Jemisin is an incredibly original fantasist.
    Maka ki ecela tehani yanke lo!

  6. #2056
    Loose Balls by Terry Pluto, about the old ABA (American Basketball Association). Hysterical!
    "Moustache stays right where it's at" - Clutch

  7. #2057
    Just finished Richard Lloyd Parry’s Ghosts of the Tsunami, an account of the Great Tohoku earthquake/tsunami that hit Japan on March 11th, 2011. Parry focuses on the most tragic tsunami event, the loss of 69 of 74 primary school students at Okawa Primary School.

    Being based in Japan with three kids of my own, the telling of the multiple stories behind the tragic hesitation and confusion that lead to the drowning of so many children like my own, was emotionally compelling, without being maudlin or intrusive.

    Unfortunately, Parry goes all finger-pointing Gaijin on the reader in one late chapter, throwing out the usual ‘here’s what’s wrong with Japan’ motifs that sullied the total product for me.

  8. #2058
    Quote Originally Posted by interbellum View Post
    I just started reading a little book in Bloomsbury 33 1/3-series: Clare Nina Norelli's Soundtrack From Twin Peaks
    The book also mentions Industrial Symphoni No. 1, featuring Julie Cruise:


  9. #2059
    Member Jerjo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    small town in ND
    Posts
    3,531
    Three books at once here, depending on my mood:

    The End of All Things by John Scalzi, Fire & Blood by GRRM, and Cibola Burn by James SA Corey.
    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  10. #2060
    Member Lou's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Cincinnati-ish
    Posts
    1,190
    Sixty Five Stirrup Iron Road

    Just finished this bizarre book. It is a novel collectively written by some of the biggest names in hardcore horror, with the profits going to colleague Tom Piccirilli. (towards medical bills).
    The authors are Edward Lee, Jack Ketchum, Brian Keene, Bryan Smith, Wrath James White, Shane McKenzie, Ryan Harding, Nate Southard, and J F Gonzalez. A story about history repeating itself
    in terms of violence and deviant sexual activity at the house that occupies Sixty Five Stirrup Iron Rd. A different author writes each succeeding chapter. If you are familiar with any of these authors,
    then you know exactly what to expect. Graphic violence and depravity, along with some humor. A no brainer for fans of any of these guys.
    A Comfort Zone is not a Life Sentence

  11. #2061
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Kalamazoo Michigan
    Posts
    3,319
    Quote Originally Posted by aith01 View Post
    Nice. I finished it a few weeks ago; really enjoyed it, and learned a lot about the man that I had never known/read before. Certainly an interesting read.
    I liked it, but didn't love it. Although there was a lot interesting stuff, there was also a lot that he left out that I would have liked to have heard about. As others have mentioned he does not go much into the making of his music itself, which I would have liked a bit more of. I admit that I have been hot and cold on Rungren over the years. I like some of his stuff, and don't care for some.

    I read Bebe Buell's book a while back and it is interesting to compare. They definitely have different perspectives on things.

  12. #2062
    facetious maximus Yves's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    1,411
    Just started reading " A Natural History Of Beer" and 2 chapters in, it's totally engrossing. It's trying to cover the entire history of beer as well as give a layman's explanation of the brewing process... It would make a great multi-part TV documentary.
    "Corn Flakes pissed in. You ranted. Mission accomplished. Thread closed."

    -Cozy 3:16-

  13. #2063
    Quote Originally Posted by Lou View Post
    Sixty Five Stirrup Iron Road

    Just finished this bizarre book. It is a novel collectively written by some of the biggest names in hardcore horror, with the profits going to colleague Tom Piccirilli. (towards medical bills).
    The authors are Edward Lee, Jack Ketchum, Brian Keene, Bryan Smith, Wrath James White, Shane McKenzie, Ryan Harding, Nate Southard, and J F Gonzalez. A story about history repeating itself
    in terms of violence and deviant sexual activity at the house that occupies Sixty Five Stirrup Iron Rd. A different author writes each succeeding chapter. If you are familiar with any of these authors,
    then you know exactly what to expect. Graphic violence and depravity, along with some humor. A no brainer for fans of any of these guys.
    Read a bunch by the first 5 names. Was it scary? I like scary.

  14. #2064
    Member Lou's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Cincinnati-ish
    Posts
    1,190
    Quote Originally Posted by Crawford Glissadevil View Post
    Read a bunch by the first 5 names. Was it scary? I like scary.
    Not particularly. Suspenseful more than scary. If you haven't read J F Gonzalez, I highly recommend you check out his work. His book Survivor might be the most disturbing thing
    I have ever read.
    A Comfort Zone is not a Life Sentence

  15. #2065
    Quote Originally Posted by Lou View Post
    Not particularly. Suspenseful more than scary. If you haven't read J F Gonzalez, I highly recommend you check out his work. His book Survivor might be the most disturbing thing
    I have ever read.
    Thanks! Put it on my list!

  16. #2066
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Kalamazoo Michigan
    Posts
    3,319
    Quote Originally Posted by Yves View Post
    Just started reading " A Natural History Of Beer" and 2 chapters in, it's totally engrossing. It's trying to cover the entire history of beer as well as give a layman's explanation of the brewing process... It would make a great multi-part TV documentary.
    I will have to check into that one. Never heard of it, but sounds right up my alley.

  17. #2067
    Member hippypants's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Tyler, Tx
    Posts
    724
    Elastic Rock: A Survey of Jazz, Tony Adam

  18. #2068
    Quote Originally Posted by hippypants View Post
    Elastic Rock: A Survey of Jazz, Tony Adam
    This sounds like an excellent, valuable resource. I'll be picking this up and probably returning to many times.

  19. #2069
    Member Koreabruce's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Chuncheon, South Korea
    Posts
    720
    Michael Pollan - How to Change Your Mind: What the New Science of Psychedelics Teaches Us About Consciousness, Dying, Addiction, Depression, and Transcendence

    Fascinating 13+ hour audiobook from 2018 that focuses on psychoactive drugs, mainly psilocybin and LSD and new (and not so new) research that underscores their highly useful applications. Pollan was nearly 60 when he first actively pursued these substances and writes vividly of his experiences. The refreshing part is that this is absolutely not a "hippie" perspective; he's a journalist and sets out to give as straightforward an account of his "travels" as possible. He's also the narrator here, and his reading is excellent. Highly recommended!

  20. #2070
    Quote Originally Posted by hippypants View Post
    Elastic Rock: A Survey of Jazz, Tony Adam
    Wow, 762 pages!! Mmm, I guess I stick with my copy of Stuart Nicholson's Jazz Rock - A History which covers more or less the same period (although slightly longer) but is more focussed on the scene in the USA, but it's tempting.
    I noticed Adam also wrote books on Jazz Rock in America, Japan, Australia, Scandinavia and Finland.

  21. #2071
    facetious maximus Yves's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    1,411
    Quote Originally Posted by SteveSly View Post
    I will have to check into that one. Never heard of it, but sounds right up my alley.
    Pretty good so far... I'm learning a few things...
    "Corn Flakes pissed in. You ranted. Mission accomplished. Thread closed."

    -Cozy 3:16-

  22. #2072
    It wouldn't surprise me if this book was mentioned earlier in this (or another) thread.
    I'm in the middle of Experiencing Progressive Rock - A Listener's Companion by Robert G.H. Burns.
    Like many of you I've read a couple of other books on "our" genre, like Macan's Rocking The Classics, David Weigel's The Show That Never Ends and Romano's Prog Rock FAQ, but something on the back-cover made me interested enough to buy this one too: Burns is a musician himself and has spoken to many of his colleagues, so this "companion" describes progrock more from the inside.

  23. #2073
    I hardly read books from Dutch writers, but a lot of people urged me to get Peter Buwalda's Bonita Avenue. Well, it got it's 30th edition lately, which became a nice bound version, so that got me (always love books that also look good!). Beginning is promissing and some things happened quite near where I live, so that makes it even nicer.

  24. #2074
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Kalamazoo Michigan
    Posts
    3,319
    I am currently reading "The Castle On Sunset" which is a history of the Chateau Marmot hotel in Hollywood. It is probably best known as the place where John Belushi died, but the place has been around since the 1920's and has an interesting history with all of it's connections to Hollywood and the music biz over the years.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •