Thread: What are you currently reading?

  1. #701
    Member hippypants's Avatar
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    Boy's Life--horror title by Robert McCammon which has a nostalgic boyhood feel to it.

  2. #702
    All Things Must Pass spellbound's Avatar
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    Yes Please by Amy Poehler.

  3. #703
    Quote Originally Posted by gryphs also View Post
    That's fantastic that you don't use "canned" units.
    Everything is from the ground up. Though I often borrow some study guide or guided reading questions from AP. They're generally of a higher level, and I often modify for the things I discuss in class, anyhow. But I've always written my own tests, done my own research, pulled in secondary sources of my choosing--it's not easy, but it's a lot easier to stand in front of the kids honestly.
    Honestly, being a principal has taken any joy out of reading.
    That is a bummer. Being an educator has certainly changed how I read. I'm probably the only guy to spend a week on a beach in Antigua annotating Vonnegut and Kesey. I wound up not teaching Kesey (and probably never will), realized that half way through Cuckoo's Nest and kept annotating it all the same. There are nights and days when I can't read for pleasure--like during the week when I graded about 150 essays--but I've never lost the desire even if it's just the monthly issue of Batman or Saga.
    Last edited by polmico; 05-11-2015 at 05:00 PM.
    I want to dynamite your mind with love tonight.

  4. #704
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    I use to love creating massive, interesting units, but when the prescriptive curriculum for Gr. 1-8 came out, there was so much to cover that there was no way to make units of grandeur work. It was part of the reason I moved into administration: the prescriptive curriculum took the fun out if teaching.

  5. #705
    Quote Originally Posted by hippypants View Post
    Boy's Life--horror title by Robert McCammon which has a nostalgic boyhood feel to it.
    This was the first book of McCammon I read in the early 90's. I loved it. I noticed it was Winner of the 1991 Bram Stoker Award and the 1992 World Fantasy Award for Best Novel. The second one was "Stinger" which was more in the horror-vein and lastly "Mine", a fine thriller.
    Coincidentally these are the only titles which were translated in Dutch. Maybe his new "Matthew Corbett Series" will change that.
    Last edited by interbellum; 05-15-2015 at 01:21 PM.

  6. #706
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    Undergraduate dissertations. I can slowly feel the will to live slipping away...

  7. #707
    Member Lopez's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by interbellum View Post
    This was the first book of McCammon I read in the early 90's. I loved it.
    The first book of his that I read was Swan Song. Man, was that brilliant. Very much like King's The Stand. End of the world stuff like Earth Abides, Alas Babylon, etc.
    Lou

    Awarded the Krusty Brand Seal of Approval. It's not just good, it's good enough.

  8. #708
    Quote Originally Posted by interbellum View Post
    This was the first book of McCammon I read in the early 90's. I loved it. I noticed it was Winner of the 1991 Bram Stoker Award and the 1992 World Fantasy Award for Best Novel. The second one was "Stinger" which was more in the horror-vein and lastly "Mine", a fine thriller.
    Coincidentally these are the only titles which were translated in Dutch. Maybe his new "Matthew Corbett Series" will change that.
    Just noticed that the same thing happened with the books of Tim Powers. The only three books I've read from him (The Anubis Gates (1983), Last Call (1992) and Expiration Date (1995)) are also the only three translated in Dutch.

  9. #709
    Jefferson James
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    Brushing Away the Blues: My Life as BB King's Hairstylist, by C. Percival McBroom

  10. #710
    Progga mogrooves's Avatar
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    Chris Hedges - Wages of Rebellion: The Moral Imperative of Revolt
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  11. #711
    Member No Pride's Avatar
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    Peter Erskine - No Beethoven

  12. #712
    Well, not exactly reading, but great stuff to watch:

    Disco-covers

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  13. #713
    All Things Must Pass spellbound's Avatar
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    I gave up on the Poehler book in the middle and switched to Terry Pratchett's collection of short stories "A Blink Of The Screen."

  14. #714
    facetious maximus Yves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lopez View Post
    The first book of his that I read was Swan Song. Man, was that brilliant. Very much like King's The Stand. End of the world stuff like Earth Abides, Alas Babylon, etc.
    Swan Song would make a perfect TV series for the likes of AMC, imo...

    I've been on an epic fantasy binge of late. Just started the "Farseer" trilogy by Robin Hobb. It treads a lot of familiar ground but it's enjoyable so far!
    "Corn Flakes pissed in. You ranted. Mission accomplished. Thread closed."

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  15. #715
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    Been reading a lot of post-apocalyptic, dystopian fiction (as opposed to the post-apocalyptic non-fiction) lately. Currently in the middle of Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel. A definite page-turner, a little different than the standard "end-of-the-world-and-what-happens-next" type thing in that it switches between pre-and-post apocalypse and has no one main protagonist. I like it fine so far.
    No matter how corrupt, greedy, and heartless our government, our corporations, our media, and our religious and charitable institutions may become, the music will still be wonderful. - Kurt Vonnegut

  16. #716
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    On those rare moments I get to read for pleasure:

    Peter F. Hamilton - The Dreaming Void. Modern-day Brit space opera, very much in the vein of Banks (RIP)/Reynolds/Stross, etc. and really rather good!

  17. #717
    Member Lopez's Avatar
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    I'm about half way through Donald Westlake's The Comedy Is Finished. It's a book he shelved years ago before he died because it's about a comedian who is kidnapped by some 60s radical-types. He felt is was too much like the movie The King of Comedy. The book was unearthed about three years ago and is pretty good. Lots of one liners by the has-been comic who's held hostage; even bound with a deadline to death, he just can't quit the comedy.
    Lou

    Awarded the Krusty Brand Seal of Approval. It's not just good, it's good enough.

  18. #718
    facetious maximus Yves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kid_runningfox View Post
    On those rare moments I get to read for pleasure:

    Peter F. Hamilton - The Dreaming Void. Modern-day Brit space opera, very much in the vein of Banks (RIP)/Reynolds/Stross, etc. and really rather good!
    Very good series. Better than it's prequel (Pandora's Star/ Judas Unchained). Hamilton has returned to this world with his latest book "The Abyss Beyond Dreams". I am now awaiting the sequel to that one.
    "Corn Flakes pissed in. You ranted. Mission accomplished. Thread closed."

    -Cozy 3:16-

  19. #719
    For light relief I recently completed This Little Ziggy by Martin Newell. Many here will not know of him, but he is a gifted English songwriter / poet / writer, who had some notoriety with his quirky lo-fi "band" The Cleaners From Venus and also has a string of solo releases, including the rather wonderful "The Greatest Living Englishman" which was produced by Andy "XTC" Partridge... Anyway this book tells that tale of his early life through to his 70's glam rock band, Plod, who gigged widely but had no releases or real success. It's an utterly hilarious read, totally truthful, no holds barred, and essential reading for anyone who loves a good tale of rock 'n' roll woes.

    Another memoir I recently read was Viv Albertine's, "Clothes, Music, Boys". Viv was guitarist in the Slits, and this too is impossible to put down, and warts 'n' all, highly recommended.

  20. #720
    Progga mogrooves's Avatar
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    Sheldon Wolin ~ Democracy Incorporated: Managed Democracy and the Specter of Inverted Totalitarianism
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  21. #721
    Studmuffin Scott Bails's Avatar
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    Finally finished Man in the Empty Suit, by Sean Ferrell. Man, what a slog to get through. An interesting premise spoiled by unlikable characters, a depressing tone, and just surreal imagery. Not my cup of tea.

    4 out of 10 parrots.
    Music isn't about chops, or even about talent - it's about sound and the way that sound communicates to people. Mike Keneally

  22. #722
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lopez View Post
    The first book of his that I read was Swan Song. Man, was that brilliant. Very much like King's The Stand. End of the world stuff like Earth Abides, Alas Babylon, etc.
    Swan Song was indeed an incredible book. Always surprised it was never made into a movie.

  23. #723
    Benjamin Percy: "Red Moon".

    Bio
    Benjamin Percy is the author of three novels, most recent among them The Dead Lands (Grand Central/Hachette, April 2015), a post apocalyptic reimagining of the Lewis and Clark saga. He is also the author of Red Moon (Grand Central/Hachette, May 2013) and The Wilding (Graywolf Press, 2010), as well as two books of short stories, Refresh, Refresh (Graywolf Press, 2007) and The Language of Elk (Grand Central/Hachette, 2012; Carnegie Mellon University Press, 2006).

    His fiction and nonfiction have been read on National Public Radio, performed at Symphony Space, and published by Esquire (where he is a contributing editor), GQ, Time, Men’s Journal, Outside, The Wall Street Journal, The Paris Review, McSweeney’s, Ploughshares, Glimmer Train, and Tin House. He also works for Detective Comics and writes the Green Arrow series, teamed with artist Patrick Zircher.

    His honors include a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Whiting Writers’ Award, two Pushcart Prizes, the Plimpton Prize, and inclusion in Best American Short Stories and Best American Comics.

    He is adapting Red Moon as a series with Oscar-winner Akiva Goldsman (A Beautiful Mind, I am Legend) with producer Ilene Staple for FOX TV. He is also currently at work on the screenplay adaptation of The Wilding for filmmaker Tanya Wexler (Hysteria). His original crime series Black Gold, which takes place in the oil fields of North Dakota, is currently in development at Starz with James Ponsoldt attached to direct.

    He has taught at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop.

  24. #724
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    Another steam punk novel.

  25. #725
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    Murakami - After Dark
    I'm halfway through and still don't know what he's playing at, but then, that's why I read Murakami.
    Wake up to find out that you are the eyes of the world.

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