Thread: What are you currently reading?

  1. #526
    Member Jerjo's Avatar
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    Just finished Dust of Dreams by Steven Erikson (9th doorstop in a 10 doorstop fantasy series) and now moving on to Charlie Stross's Atrocity Archives to cleanse the palate.
    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  2. #527
    Member Yodelgoat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Reid View Post
    The Fabric Of The Cosmos-Brian Greene
    The Origin Of Consciousness-Julian Jaynes
    How is the Origin of Consciousness? - Ive read Biocentrism by Robert Lanza - seems like a welcome reprieve from the onslaught of books I had on my list regarding string theory. Not a refutation per se, just a departure from it. A new way of looking at reality. It was lovely at times. I would like to read more on the subject of consciousness.
    I got nothin' :dgtest

    ...avoiding any implication that I have ever entertained a cognizant thought.

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  3. #528
    Member davis's Avatar
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    Keith Richards - Life
    Robert Mladinich - From the Mouth of the Monster: The Joel Rifkin Story

    back and forth.

  4. #529
    Boo! walt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by per anporth View Post
    What did you make of it, Walt? - John Harris gave it a lukewarm review in the Guardian, here in the UK - my first kneejerk response was to dismis his review. However, having started reading, I have come round to the opinion that he was pretty much spot on in his review. I've put it aside, rather sadly, after 40 or 50 pages - he is *such* a bad writer, & it is so badly edited...
    It started out well but it's getting kind of.....ponderous.I bought it based on a positive review in The Quietus.I'll try to finish it, just to get my money's worth.
    "please do not understand me too quickly"-andre gide

  5. #530
    All Things Must Pass spellbound's Avatar
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    Just finished Tibetan Peach Pie. A memoir of sorts, though author Tom Robbins denies it is an autobiography. If you like his novels, you will be intrigued and amused by the stories he tells from his life. A good read.

  6. #531
    facetious maximus Yves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gryphs also View Post
    Intentional Interruption by Steven Katz and Lisa Ain Dank: A book for leaders on how to implement professional change in their business and staff.
    .
    I'm waiting for the movie version...
    "Corn Flakes pissed in. You ranted. Mission accomplished. Thread closed."

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  7. #532
    Member Camelogue's Avatar
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    Finished "Caesar's Messiah" and "Eminent Hipsters" what a whiny old man Fagen is but spot on frequently. I guess I'm just growin old too.

    Now reading "Shakespeare's Messiah" and "Dirty Minds"

  8. #533
    Member -=RTFR666=-'s Avatar
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    Introducing my son to Carl Hiaasen's kids' series - Chomp, Hoot, Scat, and Flush. Finished Chomp and currently reading Hoot. Set in South Florida and they're turning out to be just as funny as his adult works, minus the sex, drugs, profanity, and for the most part, alcohol...yeah, yeah, release the snark, PE-ers...
    -=Will you stand by me against the cold night, or are you afraid of the ice?=-

  9. #534
    All Things Must Pass spellbound's Avatar
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    They made a movie out of Hoot. It's decent enough you can sit through it with a kid.

    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0453494/?ref_=nv_sr_1

  10. #535
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Bails View Post
    I've been wanting to read Koontz's "Odd Thomas" books, as I've heard good things about them.

    Anyone?
    Quote Originally Posted by spellbound View Post
    I believe I have read all his Odd Thomas books. I also recently found that the first one had been made into a movie, so I watched that. Follows the book pretty closely, if I remember the book this long after I read it. Not a bad series of books, IMO. Start with the first one, and if in a later book you lose interest, just stop.
    I'm halfway through the first "Odd Thomas" and I'm liking it a lot! Like Stephen King, Koontz throws a lot of humor into his supernatural horror stories and there are some moments that are lol funny. Sometimes I get a little self-conscious when I'm reading and laughing on an airplane like I was last night, but... oh well! I'll probably want to continue on with the series.

  11. #536
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    Quote Originally Posted by -=RTFR666=- View Post
    Introducing my son to Carl Hiaasen's kids' series - Chomp, Hoot, Scat, and Flush. Finished Chomp and currently reading Hoot. Set in South Florida and they're turning out to be just as funny as his adult works, minus the sex, drugs, profanity, and for the most part, alcohol...yeah, yeah, release the snark, PE-ers...
    I've read three Hiassen books over the past year (discovered him through this thread) and I've been enjoying his stuff. Maybe one or two more "adult" novels before I try one of his "kiddie" books.

  12. #537
    All Things Must Pass spellbound's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by No Pride
    Like Stephen King, Koontz throws a lot of humor into his supernatural horror stories and there are some moments that are lol funny.
    I like Koontz's humor and his sense of suspense and action. My main complaint about him is that in some cases the endings to his books are lame. But that hasn't deterred me from reading a lot of them.

    Sometimes I get a little self-conscious when I'm reading and laughing on an airplane like I was last night, but... oh well!
    Why worry about it? At least people can see that you are reading and it must be something funny in the book. I once went to a movie at which my friend and I were the only ones laughing. Maybe we were supposed to feel sorry for the characters who seemed stupid, but we saw them as comic relief in a movie that was a little too maudlin.

  13. #538
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    Quote Originally Posted by spellbound View Post
    I like Koontz's humor and his sense of suspense and action. My main complaint about him is that in some cases the endings to his books are lame. But that hasn't deterred me from reading a lot of them.
    That's exactly what I often say about Stephen King.

    Quote Originally Posted by spellbound View Post
    Why worry about it?
    Oh, I don't actually worry about it. I'm too old to care what people think of me. I might still have a moment, but I generally come back to my senses in a second or two. Besides, there are plenty of people on airplanes that should worry about their behavior... but unfortunately for the rest of us, don't.

  14. #539
    Just finished A Quiet Believe In Angels by R.J. Ellory. I hadn't read anything from him yet, but loved it very much. It's a thriller, a coming of age and a drama (some parts even remembered me of Styron's Sophie's Choice). When I googled his name I found out Ellory was the one who wrote reviews for his own books on Amazon. Well, he did apologize for that when it came out, but a strange story it was... He'll release a new book these days.

  15. #540
    All Things Must Pass spellbound's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by No Pride View Post
    Oh, I don't actually worry about it. I'm too old to care what people think of me. I might still have a moment, but I generally come back to my senses in a second or two. Besides, there are plenty of people on airplanes that should worry about their behavior... but unfortunately for the rest of us, don't.
    Good point. People on airplanes don't have to worry about me anymore. Bastards don't have seats with enough legroom for a full grown man, and I can't afford first class, so I no longer fly. If they want my business, they will have to treat me like a human.

  16. #541
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    Quote Originally Posted by spellbound View Post
    I like Koontz's humor and his sense of suspense and action. My main complaint about him is that in some cases the endings to his books are lame. But that hasn't deterred me from reading a lot of them.
    I finished "Odd Thomas" last night. I wouldn't call the ending "lame" by any means, but it bummed me out. I can't say anything more without a major "spoiler." I liked the book a lot and would heartily recommend it, but... just sayin'.

  17. #542
    Member Lopez's Avatar
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    A while ago, I picked up a copy of the Prince of Providence, the story of Buddy Cianci, former and most likely future mayor of the capitol of Rhode Island. I started reading it a couple weeks ago and am almost done. Man, is it good. I'm originally from Providence and most of the names in the book are familiar. The book seems very fair and unbiased. There are no completely "good guys" in the book. Everyone turns out to be a criminal or a rat or corrupt to some extent. One guy upon whose testimony Buddy was convicted, said he wanted, as young man, to get into politics "for the honesty of it." I always liked Buddy; now I'm not so sure.
    Lou

    Awarded the Krusty Brand Seal of Approval. It's not just good, it's good enough.

  18. #543
    Member davis's Avatar
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    At the risk of no getting serious answers, what is the best (informative, well written, not gossipy or sensational) book - or books - about AC/DC?

  19. #544
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    I finished my fourth Carl Hiassen novel, "Sick Puppy." It was enjoyable (as were the other three), but they're all a little too similar. There's always corrupt politicians and corporations, a psychotic hit man, a budding romance, the ever present Skink, and a prevalent "save the environment" message. It's a great formula, but I'm starting to burn out on it. Maybe I'll try one of his kiddie books.

  20. #545
    Studmuffin Scott Bails's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by No Pride View Post
    I finished my fourth Carl Hiassen novel, "Sick Puppy." It was enjoyable (as were the other three), but they're all a little too similar. There's always corrupt politicians and corporations, a psychotic hit man, a budding romance, the ever present Skink, and a prevalent "save the environment" message. It's a great formula, but I'm starting to burn out on it. Maybe I'll try one of his kiddie books.
    Probably why I haven't read him in a while. I really like him, but haven't read him in about 2 years.

    Maybe next summer.
    Music isn't about chops, or even about talent - it's about sound and the way that sound communicates to people. Mike Keneally

  21. #546
    Highly Evolved Orangutan JKL2000's Avatar
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    Just started Consumed by David Cronenberg. His first book!

    I'm a little more than halfway through this and really enjoying it. Pretty much what I expected from him. A lot of creepy and interesting stuff all intertwined.
    Last edited by JKL2000; 10-18-2014 at 10:37 PM.

  22. #547
    Member Jerjo's Avatar
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    The Magicians by Lev Grossman
    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  23. #548
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    I'm embarrassed to admit that I just recently finished for the first time: "To Kill A Mockingbird" and "Flowers For Algernon". Insert "coulda hadda a V8" headslap here.
    No matter how corrupt, greedy, and heartless our government, our corporations, our media, and our religious and charitable institutions may become, the music will still be wonderful. - Kurt Vonnegut

  24. #549
    I'm here for the moosic NogbadTheBad's Avatar
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    Spam Alert

    A good friend of mine has just released his debut novel to pretty good reviews

    http://www.amazon.com/Last-Words-Col...rich+zahradnik

    In March of 1975, as New York City hurtles toward bankruptcy and the Bronx burns, newsman Coleridge Taylor roams police precincts and ERs. He is looking for the story that will deliver him from obits, his place of exile at the Messenger-Telegram. Ever since he was demoted from the police beat for inventing sources, the 34-year-old has been a lost soul. A break comes at Bellevue, where Taylor views the body of a homeless teen picked up in the Meatpacking District. Taylor smells a rat: the dead boy looks too clean, and he’s wearing a distinctive Army field jacket. A little digging reveals that the jacket belonged to a hobo named Mark Voichek and that the teen was a spoiled society kid up to no good, the son of a city official. Taylor’s efforts to protect Voichek put him on the hit list of three goons who are willing to kill any number of street people to cover tracks that just might lead to City Hall. Taylor has only one ally in the newsroom, young and lovely reporter Laura Wheeler. Time is not on his side. If he doesn’t wrap this story up soon, he’ll be back on the obits page—as a headline, not a byline. Last Words is the first book in the Coleridge Taylor mystery series.
    Ian

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    I blame Wynton, what was the question?
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  25. #550
    Member Lopez's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by davis View Post
    At the risk of no getting serious answers, what is the best (informative, well written, not gossipy or sensational) book - or books - about AC/DC?
    For me, it's Maximum Rock & Roll. I read the Australian edition a few years ago. I believe it has just been released in an American edition with a different cover. Lengthy book and highly informative, especially about the formation of the band and the Bon Scott years.
    Lou

    Awarded the Krusty Brand Seal of Approval. It's not just good, it's good enough.

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