Thread: What are you currently reading?

  1. #426
    Member Bungalow Bill's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Vermont U.S.A.
    Posts
    58
    Quote Originally Posted by WHORG View Post
    Cloud Atlas
    I thought this one was superb.
    For that which is not,
    there is no coming into being
    and for that which is,
    there is no ceasing to be;
    yea of both of these the lookers into truth have seen an end.
    Bhagavad Gita

  2. #427
    Member Bungalow Bill's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Vermont U.S.A.
    Posts
    58
    Quote Originally Posted by per anporth View Post
    If this isn't the best short story ever written, then there are very few that are better than it.
    And saddest...
    For that which is not,
    there is no coming into being
    and for that which is,
    there is no ceasing to be;
    yea of both of these the lookers into truth have seen an end.
    Bhagavad Gita

  3. #428
    All Things Must Pass spellbound's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Eastern Sierra
    Posts
    2,012
    Relentless by Yngwie Malmsteen

  4. #429
    facetious maximus Yves's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    1,600
    Quote Originally Posted by Bungalow Bill View Post
    Oh man. The Road? Yes.

    Thomas Covenant? No. As much as I like fantasy, some of it is really dopey, and this series is severely dopey. I'd recommend Earthsea instead, or maybe the Gormenghast novels.
    To each his own I guess. The Covenant series is different. It does not fit into the typical high fantasy mold.

    I read Gormenghast. First two books were excellent, third book didn't work for me. Not familiar with Earthsea, though I'm basically done with fantasy, with the exception of Martin's series...if he ever finishes it.
    "Corn Flakes pissed in. You ranted. Mission accomplished. Thread closed."

    -Cozy 3:16-

  5. #430
    Member Jerjo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    small town in ND
    Posts
    4,978
    I read Gormenghast. First two books were excellent, third book didn't work for me
    The third book was patched together after Peake's death. That might be why it doesn't work as well.
    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  6. #431
    Member Bungalow Bill's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Vermont U.S.A.
    Posts
    58
    Quote Originally Posted by Yves View Post
    To each his own I guess. The Covenant series is different. It does not fit into the typical high fantasy mold.

    I read Gormenghast. First two books were excellent, third book didn't work for me. Not familiar with Earthsea, though I'm basically done with fantasy, with the exception of Martin's series...if he ever finishes it.
    Agreed re: Gormenghast.

    Earthsea is great. At least read the first one to see what you think. It's a quick read and not cliched or hackneyed.

    Can't agree with you about Thomas C. That shit is wretched. I like the anti-hero aspect but otherwise I can't take it. TEHO, as you say.
    For that which is not,
    there is no coming into being
    and for that which is,
    there is no ceasing to be;
    yea of both of these the lookers into truth have seen an end.
    Bhagavad Gita

  7. #432
    Food Network magazine, March 2014 : The Bacon Issue.

    Bacon---the most perfect food. Everything is better with it.

  8. #433
    Boo! walt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Oakland Gardens NY
    Posts
    4,981
    The Pine Barrens-John McPhee
    "please do not understand me too quickly"-andre gide

  9. #434
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Re-deployed as of 22 July
    Posts
    0
    Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children - Ransom Riggs

  10. #435
    The Weather Forecast
    NEVER UNDERESTIMATE THE POWER OF STUPID PEOPLE IN LARGE GROUPS!

  11. #436
    Studmuffin Scott Bails's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Near Philly, PA
    Posts
    4,657
    I'm about to start Veronica Roth's Divergent.

    My 11-year-old daughter loved it, so I want to 1) be in the loop on what she's reading and 2) see what all the fuss is about. I loved The Hunger Games trilogy, so I'm expecting to enjoy this, too. Plus, the movie comes out this month, and I like to read the book before I see the movie.
    Music isn't about chops, or even about talent - it's about sound and the way that sound communicates to people. Mike Keneally

  12. #437
    Member Jerjo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    small town in ND
    Posts
    4,978
    I am spending the next couple weeks on writing query letters for agents. I've got a few books on the iPad that I'm reading but mostly I'm surfing through Jeff Vandermeer's Wonderbook, (The Illustrated Guide to Creating Imaginative Fiction)

    http://wonderbooknow.com/
    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  13. #438
    Member No Pride's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Chicago, IL, USA
    Posts
    137
    I already said this in the "horror books" thread, but... I read Mary Shelly's "Frankenstein" a couple of weeks ago. It was really good (especially coming from such a young author), but very sad and depressing. Of course I was familiar with the classic Boris Karloff films (Frankenstein and The Bride of Frankenstein), but I always suspected they were very loosely based on the book and reading it confirmed those suspicions beyond what I expected. Unlike the films, the creature was no dummy, but rather an intelligent and rational being whose constant persecution from everybody including his creator gradually turned him into a remorseful murderer.

    I'm currently reading another David Baldacci book, but I think I'm burning out on his style.
    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Bails View Post
    I loved The Hunger Games trilogy
    I did too, although I found the third one to be slightly disappointing. I read them on sort of a fluke; I was out on a tour with the band that I tour with and in my haste packing for it, I accidentally brought a book that I had already read. Somebody in the band had just finished the first book and loaned it to me and I got so drawn in that I had to finish the trilogy. I "get" the ending; war changes people's lives forever and not for the better, but I don't know, it was such a melancholy take on a "happy" ending. Still, I'll probably want to read whatever she writes next.

  14. #439
    Member BobM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Ponte Vedra, FL
    Posts
    648
    Reading the 3rd installment of Mark Lawrence's "The Broken Empire" series, called Emperor of Thorns. The series is firmly in that "reality fantasy" genre that Geoorge Martin made popular and Joe Abercrombie took to an extreme.

    Main character was plagued by hardship when young, becomes ruthless/heartless, succeeds because of it and despite himself, seeks revenge. You feel for the main character, and cheer him on to some extent but are also repulsed by their train of thought and deeds at the same time.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    A gentleman is defined as someone who knows how to play the accordion, and doesn't.

  15. #440
    Member Big Ears's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    On the Stones of Years
    Posts
    151
    Quote Originally Posted by No Pride View Post
    I already said this in the "horror books" thread, but... I read Mary Shelly's "Frankenstein" a couple of weeks ago. It was really good (especially coming from such a young author), but very sad and depressing. Of course I was familiar with the classic Boris Karloff films (Frankenstein and The Bride of Frankenstein), but I always suspected they were very loosely based on the book and reading it confirmed those suspicions beyond what I expected. Unlike the films, the creature was no dummy, but rather an intelligent and rational being whose constant persecution from everybody including his creator gradually turned him into a remorseful murderer.
    Mary Shelley's mother, Mary Wollstonecraft, was also an accomplished writer.
    Member since Wednesday 09.09.09

  16. #441
    Member wideopenears's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    544
    I'm reading "Murder in the Vatican" which is about the short papal (?) Career of John Paul the First. I dunno, it's not a great book but I will finish it. Then I think I'm going to read Peter Ackroyd's "Foundation" about England's early history.

  17. #442
    I'm here for the moosic NogbadTheBad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    7,376
    Terry Pratchett - Snuff, Inspector Vimes goes on vacation to his wifes ancestral home with the usual predicatable results. I particularly like the Night Watch characters in Pratchetts books. Pratchett has effectively built a self contained universe that allows for individual stories but a very familiar setting. His combination of fantasy and humor with a lot of sideways digs at the real world works extremely well.
    Ian

    Gordon Haskell - "You've got to keep the groove in your head and play a load of bollocks instead"
    I blame Wynton, what was the question?
    There are only 10 types of people in the World, those who understand binary and those that don't.

  18. #443
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    299
    Quote Originally Posted by wideopenears View Post
    I'm reading "Murder in the Vatican" which is about the short papal (?) Career of John Paul the First. I dunno, it's not a great book but I will finish it. Then I think I'm going to read Peter Ackroyd's "Foundation" about England's early history.
    Would be interested on your thoughts when you get to Ackroyds book. I've been thinking about pulling the trigger on his William Blake bio and also his historical fiction book about the English architect Nicholas Hawksmoor.

    best
    Michael
    If it ain't acousmatique-It's crap

  19. #444
    Irritated Lawn Guy Klonk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Rockland, NY
    Posts
    1,624
    I'm thinking about checking out Joe Hill (Steven King's son) first book 'Heart Shaped Box'. He's got a few books out there, but figured I'd go with the first. It has pretty good reviews. Anyone read anything by him? Also looking for some good current horror books. I can't sleep without being scared
    "Who would have thought a whale would be so heavy?" - Moe

  20. #445
    Member Jerjo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    small town in ND
    Posts
    4,978
    All I've read where the first couple Locke and Key graphic novels. They were very well done. I've never seen a bad review of Joe Hill's stuff.
    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  21. #446
    All Things Must Pass spellbound's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Eastern Sierra
    Posts
    2,012
    Finished Tiger Shrimp Tango by Tim Dorsey.

    Started What's So Funny? by Tim Conway.

  22. #447
    Member wideopenears's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    544
    Quote Originally Posted by neuroticdog View Post
    Would be interested on your thoughts when you get to Ackroyds book. I've been thinking about pulling the trigger on his William Blake bio and also his historical fiction book about the English architect Nicholas Hawksmoor.

    best
    Michael
    Will do. I read "Albion: The Origins of the English Imagination" and enjoyed it quite a bit. It's not "Hard History" or "Academic," but it's thoughtful and far-ranging.

  23. #448
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Everywhere with helicopter
    Posts
    237
    "The Salinger Contract" by Adam Langer. A rather outlandish premise with a weak payoff. Don't bother.
    No matter how corrupt, greedy, and heartless our government, our corporations, our media, and our religious and charitable institutions may become, the music will still be wonderful. - Kurt Vonnegut

  24. #449
    Member Lopez's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Medford, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,875
    Quote Originally Posted by Klonk View Post
    I'm thinking about checking out Joe Hill (Steven King's son) first book 'Heart Shaped Box'. He's got a few books out there, but figured I'd go with the first. It has pretty good reviews. Anyone read anything by him? Also looking for some good current horror books. I can't sleep without being scared
    I've read his collection of short stories, The Heart-Shaped Box, and Horns. All are very good. Give him a chance, you'll be glad you did. Horns is being made into a movie with Daniel Radcliffe as the protagonist. When I heard that, I reread the book and it was better the second time around. Joe has a new one out now called NOS4A2. Looks good from the synopsis on the inside flap.
    Lou

    Awarded the Krusty Brand Seal of Approval. It's not just good, it's good enough.

  25. #450
    Irritated Lawn Guy Klonk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Rockland, NY
    Posts
    1,624
    Thanks! I'm starting with Heart Shaped Box and we'll see from there.
    "Who would have thought a whale would be so heavy?" - Moe

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •