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Thread: Supper's Ready - the full menu

  1. #51
    Quote Originally Posted by WytchCrypt View Post
    I believe I read they were made by an Italian organ company...possibly Crumar? I thought they might appear on the 1972 Belgian TV appearance during the Fountain of Salmacis but didn't see any bass pedals anywhere on stage.
    He would have used them on The Musical Box, I think that's the only song that he plays guitar on, on the Belgian TV thing. Rutherford only played bass pedals on songs where he played guitar. The whole idea for that came out of the period immediately following Ant's departure from the band. They tried to go forward, with Rutherford playing guitar and bass pedals full time, and with Tony filling in some of the solos on electric piano with a fuzz pedal on it. I think that lasted for a few months, before they decided they needed another guitarist.

  2. #52
    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    He would have used them on The Musical Box, I think that's the only song that he plays guitar on, on the Belgian TV thing. Rutherford only played bass pedals on songs where he played guitar. The whole idea for that came out of the period immediately following Ant's departure from the band. They tried to go forward, with Rutherford playing guitar and bass pedals full time, and with Tony filling in some of the solos on electric piano with a fuzz pedal on it. I think that lasted for a few months, before they decided they needed another guitarist.
    Very cool...didn't know that. Just had a close look at the Belgian TV clip of The Musical Box, it's not a very clear picture but it appears Rutherford does indeed have a 1 octave bass pedal instrument in his pedalboard. It looks suspiciously like the one Jon Anderson was playing in the Beat Club vid I posted earlier

    Genesis15.jpg
    I'm using the chicken to measure it...

  3. #53
    Also had a look at the Live at the Rainbow '73 show and took this screenshot...again looks suspiciously like the bass pedals Jon Anderson was playing

    Genesis16.jpg
    I'm using the chicken to measure it...

  4. #54
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    Thanks for many interesting replies to this post.
    Some of the views have surprised me (I wasn't expecting much love for the Melody TV Video!) and I've dug out my Syria Mosque boot from the 1976 tour to review my thoughts on the Bruford line-up's performance.
    Although the OP wasn't intended to discuss boots, I've got to admit that this performance is (to me) far below the standard of the 1977 one that appears on SO. However, maybe I should listen again to a 1977 tour boot to judge how much of that margin might be due to studio tinkering.
    I appreciate how many people have split their comments in reference to different sections of SR, the differences in performers, instruments, arrangements and key changes. Sometimes its not easy to put your finger on what is more to your taste in A/B comparisons.
    Changes in key of part (if not all) of the song can be crucial but unfortunately I don't have a musicians ear to spot these differences. If anybody wants to identify the key of any of the recorded versions I for one would be interested to hear their observations.

  5. #55
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    Just remembered that I have the published sheet music book for the SO album (Wise Publications 1978).
    According to this book (and my hopeless music reading skills):

    Lover's Leap and The Guaranteed Eternal Sanctuary Man are both in C major throughout.
    Ikhnaton and Itsacon starts in G major but jumps to D major (at "waiting for battle").
    How Dare I be so Beautiful is in G major.
    Willow Farm starts in Ab major, changes to E major (at "we've got everything") and back to Ab major (at "All Change"). Finally it's in B major from "and as you listen..." to the end.
    Apocalypse in 9/8 and As Sure as Eggs is Eggs are both in C major throughout.

    A caveat: My experience of published sheet music is that it can be notorious for having the key wrong - I haven't a clue why this should be.
    So bear in mind the published transcription (a) may not necessarily be correct and (b) might not relate to the SO version!

  6. #56
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    ^Indeed, hardly any of those keys are right, to my ears. 'As Sure As Eggs Is Eggs' was tuned down a whole tone live (A major to G major, again to my ears).

  7. #57
    Quote Originally Posted by r2daft2 View Post
    A caveat: My experience of published sheet music is that it can be notorious for having the key wrong - I haven't a clue why this should be.
    Absolutely. Wrong key, wrong chords, etc...it really depends on who did the transcription. One of, if not the best and most accurate prog sheet music books I ever bought (and still break out from time to time), is this one from the late 70's. It includes all of Trick of the Tail & Wind and Wuthering and is fantastic. It's been out of print for years (probably decades) but looks like Amazon currently has a line on a used copy for $22 plus $4 shipping. This is a steal for anyone wanting accurate piano & chords from these albums (plus a great transcription of Hackett's classical guitar intro to Blood on the Rooftops).

    https://www.amazon.com/Genesis-Trick.../dp/B000BRQUS8
    Last edited by WytchCrypt; 1 Day Ago at 12:11 PM.
    I'm using the chicken to measure it...

  8. #58
    Quote Originally Posted by WytchCrypt View Post
    Absolutely. Wrong key, wrong chords, etc...it really depends on who did the transcription. One of, if not the best and most accurate prog sheet music books I ever bought (and still break out from time to time), is this one from the late 70's. It includes all of Trick of the Tail & Wind and Wuthering and is fantastic. It's been out of print for years (probably decades) but looks like Amazon currently has a line on a used copy for $22 plus $4 shipping. This is a steal for anyone wanting accurate piano & chords from these albums (plus a great transcription of Hackett's classical guitar intro to Blood on the Rooftops).

    https://www.amazon.com/Genesis-Trick.../dp/B000BRQUS8
    I have that book and it's excellent. I learned the intro to "Blood on the rooftops" from that. The worst sheet music book I
    ever bought was the "Beatlemania" songbook which even got time signatures wrong like having Fool.On the Hill in 3/4. I guess that would be ok for a polka or waltz version...

  9. #59
    Quote Originally Posted by the winter tree View Post
    I have that book and it's excellent. I learned the intro to "Blood on the rooftops" from that. The worst sheet music book I
    ever bought was the "Beatlemania" songbook which even got time signatures wrong like having Fool.On the Hill in 3/4. I guess that would be ok for a polka or waltz version...
    Cool, I learned Tony Banks' Mad Man Moon piano intro from that book and it was spot on. I gained a huge amount of respect for Banks' composing and playing ability from studying that book, there's some very difficult things going on that he makes sound so easy. I agree about "Beatlemania" being the worst I ever saw...the most complete and accurate Beatles book I ever had was, "The Beatles: Complete Scores". Well over 1,000 pages and highly accurate...though annoyingly small print. My favorite Beatles book is "The Concise Beatles Complete" from 1982. Every song with vocal melody lines in standard notation and accompanying chords (except Revolution 9 )
    I'm using the chicken to measure it...

  10. #60
    Before the mid 80's, songbooks were terrible. Most of what was out there was "guitar/piano accompaniement" things, where you'd have the vocal melody, and then you'd have the chords, and that was about it. If there was an instrumental hook, say the guitar hooks on Day Tripper (I Can't Get No) Satisfaction, that might be notated, sort of. I think the reason they were always in the wrong key tied to the fact that most of the time, they couldn't use the arrangement that was used on the record (they'd have had to pay extra for that). So the songs would be in the wrong key, and as one of the guys who did those transcription books that first started to surface in the 80's once noted, "There'd always been an F# chord that sound right". And of course, you didn't get things like guitar solos.

    I've got a Pink Floyd songbook, that hs a lot of early stuff, a guitar transcription book. I'm not sure if it's in the right key, but the transcription to Celestial Voices (yeah, they took an organ piece and arranged it for the top three strings of the guitar) sounds right to my ears. Echoes is in the wrong key, and is missing the middle (basically it's the a chunk of the intro, the vocal sections, and the instrumental chromatic thing that comes at the end of each verse) but again, it sounded right to my ears. Astronomy Domine and Set The Controls To The Heart Of The Sun both appeared to be correct, though they simplified the guitar riffs I think. I can't remember what else in that book.

    I remember James Taylor saying that when his record company first started putting out songbooks of his music, they didn't notate the capo positions. So people were trying to figure out the songs from the chord shapes in the book, not realizing that it should have said "Capo at the 3rd fret" or whatever.

  11. #61
    Foxtrot for me. Also fine 1974 version from a Canadian gig out there.
    Sleeping at home is killing the hotel business!

  12. #62
    Quote Originally Posted by r2daft2 View Post
    Just remembered that I have the published sheet music book for the SO album (Wise Publications 1978).
    According to this book (and my hopeless music reading skills):

    Lover's Leap and The Guaranteed Eternal Sanctuary Man are both in C major throughout.
    Ikhnaton and Itsacon starts in G major but jumps to D major (at "waiting for battle").
    How Dare I be so Beautiful is in G major.
    Willow Farm starts in Ab major, changes to E major (at "we've got everything") and back to Ab major (at "All Change"). Finally it's in B major from "and as you listen..." to the end.
    Apocalypse in 9/8 and As Sure as Eggs is Eggs are both in C major throughout.

    A caveat: My experience of published sheet music is that it can be notorious for having the key wrong - I haven't a clue why this should be.
    So bear in mind the published transcription (a) may not necessarily be correct and (b) might not relate to the SO version!
    Way back when I was a member of the Deep Purple fan club, one of the other members offered a book of DP song transcriptions for Blackmore to sign; I think it was open at Smoke on the Water. Blackmore took it, looked at it, and scribbled down corrections to the guitar chord notations!

  13. #63
    Quote Originally Posted by Halmyre View Post
    Way back when I was a member of the Deep Purple fan club, one of the other members offered a book of DP song transcriptions for Blackmore to sign; I think it was open at Smoke on the Water. Blackmore took it, looked at it, and scribbled down corrections to the guitar chord notations!
    I remember the first time Metallica was featured in Guitar Player, James Hetfield was talking about how he doesn't read music. He said that when they do meet and greet things, kids will bring songbooks for them to sign, and they'll say things like "I'm having trouble with this bit right here", and how he can't help them because he doesn't understand what any of means on paper. He then says "I'll tell them, 'Oh, that bit isn't right, let me correct it for you'. Mess with their heads". That was the same interviewed where they asked if there wasn't anything he wished he could do on a guitar, and he said "Well, a beer holder would be nice". I can't remember if it was him or Hammett who made the comment about how "If we ever saw a five string guitar, we'd just throw it away", apparently because so much of Metallica's sound relies on the low E string or whatever. I remember laughing about that, thinking "I wonder if these guys have ever heard of the Rolling Stones".

  14. #64
    Quote Originally Posted by Halmyre View Post
    Way back when I was a member of the Deep Purple fan club, one of the other members offered a book of DP song transcriptions for Blackmore to sign; I think it was open at Smoke on the Water. Blackmore took it, looked at it, and scribbled down corrections to the guitar chord notations!
    Knowing Blackmore, I'm shocked he didn't tear the book into little pieces and throw it at the guy
    I'm using the chicken to measure it...

  15. #65
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    My fave Supper's Ready is probably from Seconds Out.

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