Results 1 to 17 of 17

Thread: Featured album: Paatos - Timeloss

  1. #1
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    in a cosmic jazzy-groove around Brussels
    Posts
    4,018

    Featured album: Paatos - Timeloss

    http://www.progarchives.com/progress...1529102009.jpg

    Paatos - Timeloss

    paatos.jpg

    Tracks Listing
    1. Sensor (5:11)
    2. Hypnotique (8:32)
    3. Téa (5:45)
    4. They Are Beautiful (7:44)
    5. Quits (12:17)
    6. Cuka (8:28)
    7. Ctaku (3:08)

    Line-up:

    - Stefan Dimle / bass and double bass
    - Reine Fiske / electric and acoustic guitars
    - Huxflux Nettermalm / drums, congas, percussion, water, saw, triangle, programming
    - Petronella Nettermalm / vocals and cello
    - Johan Wallén / electric piano, Hammond organ, Moog, clavia, Yamaha synths, mellotron, upright piano, Steinway grand piano, harmonium, sampler

    Guests:
    - David Wilczewski / flute (2), clarinet, bass clarinet (4)
    - Adrian and Maila Dimle / background sounds (4)
    - Téa Nettermalm / background sounds (4)
    - Jonas Wall / saxophone (5)
    - Micke Sörensen / trumpet (5)
    - Per Kristensson / trombone



    Here is what Yours Truly had to say about the Japanese version (with two extra tracks) on ProgArchives
    Finally an innovative group. A lot of my friends, although they dislike everything to do with rap, techno and other styles of recent music forms (I do too but can enjoy some French rap), actually thought that trip-hop was interesting because of the very expressive moods that bands like Portishead or the early Bjork. I thought that in the mid-90's, trip hop could present a form of evolution for proggers. As far as I know, this is the first album of its kind to exploit that direction and they have stricken gold right from the start. The moods and ambiances are simply beautiful as is Petronella who looks like she's coming from the northern part of Sweden and has got Lapp blood in her and in concert she made me think of the star from Iceland (Bjork), under the careful eye of hubby Huxflux, from behind his drum kit. On guitar, eine Fiske (of Landberk fame) adds up with his so expressive guitar lines this touch of almost divine background, while the other ex-Landberk Stefan Dimle rattles the bass guitar strings. Rounding up the quintet is Wallen on vintage keys.

    The album seems to have at least a retro visual concept matching its title, the booklet pages showing illustration of outdated house interiors, starting with the Art Deco hotel hallway lift cage on the front cover. Opening on the excellent Sensor, starting on jazzy bass and electric piano, but once Fiske's guitar enters, the track veers superbly rock, with Petronella's voice underlined by trons of mello make a banner track, well worth the early 90's Swedish trilogy. The following and aptly-titled Hypnotique is a soft spellbinding track, lasting over 8-mins, with Petro on cello, again a superb load of mellotron washes and a guest flutist giving a haunting ambiance. Téa starts with Fiske's ever-recognizable guitar and this crescendoing track (not my fave, though) will become the A side (remixed I think) of their 45 RPM single. Fiske again opens They Are Beautiful, the weaker track of the album (IMHO, anyway), despite a superb clarinet (courtesy of the flutist mentioned above), but I find the track a little long.

    Do overcome your prejudice and listen to the last track Quits, as it may set you back but if you listen carefully and are open minded, this track alone is worth hunting the album as it is mind-boggling and offers great possibilities for the group's future adventures. It is the most openly trip hop track of the album, but is the apex of the album. In concert, Quits was used to get you wilded up at the end of the set and makes you (and the rest of the crowd) beg to hear it again as the first, second and third encores.

    Of course, the main deception was the album's short duration (less than 40 mins), BUT?.. The Japanese version of this album comes with two bonus tracks, thus bringing an extra superb 13 mins of pure bliss. Both tracks are without Fiske's guitars (he had already gone by then), but Nylander fills the shoes as if they were his. The 8-mins+ Ouka sounds like a superb quiet improv, but carefully controlled; while Otaku is definitely more chaotic and abstract, filled Petro's cello and weird electronic noises. Great stuff, well in line with Quits. Timeloss is definitely one of the 00's best albums and few albums of the 90's and 80's in the prog realm can come to its shoulder height. Think I'm exaggerating, uh? Get this album and quick! Try for the superb Japanese Mini-Lp version with the bonus tracks, if still available.





    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from drug-addicts to complete nutcases.

  2. #2
    Member TheH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    2,019
    Great Album, really like it. I think it is their best although I like some of their follow ups too (Kallocain at least)

    Fiske is clearly missing on their later efforts.

    There is a good Chance that they will return soon (at least they are teasing with that for some time now)

    Huxflux and Petronella Nettermalm are really cool soundig names :-)

  3. #3
    I got this CD when it came out (I didn't have the Japanese version with the two extra tracks, mine ended with Quits). I liked aspects of the first few songs, some nice melodies, a nice laid back vibe. Sometimes a bit too laid-back, almost like Lanberk on quaaludes, if you get more laid back they'll have to check for your pulse.

    But I could always count on Quits to wake me up, just in time to rush to the player and shut that crap off. Dreadful song, imo, totally not in keeping with the rest of the album, and not of any interest to me what-so-ever. "I want a dance pop song on my Prog album," said no one ever. I tried to live with the first tracks alone on a CDR, but then I just fell asleep and nothing woke me up. I bought the album for the Landberk connection, but to me this has nothing of their quiet power or sonic diversity. Boner pile.

    Bill

  4. #4
    I got this album many years ago and somehow it failed to make any impression on me at all. I listened a few times and didn't get anything out of it.

    Maybe I should revisit...if I still have it...gawd knows.
    “your ognna pay pay with my wrath of ballbat”

    Bandcamp Profile

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Sputnik View Post

    But I could always count on Quits to wake me up, just in time to rush to the player and shut that crap off. Dreadful song, imo, totally not in keeping with the rest of the album, and not of any interest to me what-so-ever. "I want a dance pop song on my Prog album," said no one ever. I tried to live with the first tracks alone on a CDR, but then I just fell asleep and nothing woke me up. I bought the album for the Landberk connection, but to me this has nothing of their quiet power or sonic diversity. Boner pile.

    Bill
    This is why it's always fascinating to read individual perspectives on music - the diversity of the way we hear things is always a revelation. Regarding "Quits", I don't hear a dance pop song although its foundation is the Drum n Bass style of EDM that was popular. However, I hear it as jazz fusion albeit using the aforementioned style rather than coming at it from the jazz-with-a-rock-influence place that the genre originated with in the US. I wonder how Paatos would do putting out a proggy chill hop album.
    No matter what anyone says, you are the decider of how you will listen to music.

  6. #6
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    in a cosmic jazzy-groove around Brussels
    Posts
    4,018
    Quote Originally Posted by Splicer View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Sputnik View Post
    But I could always count on Quits to wake me up, just in time to rush to the player and shut that crap off. Dreadful song, imo, totally not in keeping with the rest of the album, and not of any interest to me what-so-ever. "I want a dance pop song on my Prog album," said no one ever. I tried to live with the first tracks alone on a CDR, but then I just fell asleep and nothing woke me up. I bought the album for the Landberk connection, but to me this has nothing of their quiet power or sonic diversity. Boner pile.
    This is why it's always fascinating to read individual perspectives on music - the diversity of the way we hear things is always a revelation. Regarding "Quits", I don't hear a dance pop song although its foundation is the Drum n Bass style of EDM that was popular. However, I hear it as jazz fusion albeit using the aforementioned style rather than coming at it from the jazz-with-a-rock-influence place that the genre originated with in the US. I wonder how Paatos would do putting out a proggy chill hop album.
    Upon first listen, I also WTF'd on Quits, but I replayed it right away and understood it and on the third time, I certainly didn't strike out, though it was not a homerun either

    Actually, my buddy hated it as well, but the track really came to life live on stage, as I just knew it would.
    That track really lit the Spirit (in Verviers) aflame.
    Last edited by Trane; 1 Week Ago at 10:02 AM.
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from drug-addicts to complete nutcases.

  7. #7
    Moderator Duncan Glenday's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Frederick, MD
    Posts
    847
    I wrote this in 2005:

    Style : Symphonic progressive rock

    Rating : 4 / 5

    Summary : A wild avant jazz wolf draped in the clothing of soft lullabies. An excellent debut.

    In music conversations and in the chat-rooms, you'll be surprised by how many people insist that Paatos's first album Timeloss is superior to their second CD, Kallocain. Which probably explains why InsideOut's 2005 re-release of the 2002 record has been so well received.

    And the highlight of Timeloss is one little 6-minute song that just may stay with you for months after you hear it. Among others, Paatos includes husband and wife team Ricard and Petronella Nettermalm. Petronella's soft, musical vocals are a large part of the attraction to this band's music, and their daughter Téa inspired track 3 - a lullabye sung in Swedish. This piece is so deeply personal you feel like an intruder eavesdropping on the sacred intimacy of a mother and child’s relationship. It is a soft piece with Mellotrons, piano and guitar working together in a gently blended mix to support Nettermalm's simple, stirring vocals. In a recent discussion about music that brings tears to your eyes, this track came up several times and a friend commented simply "ye gods, what a piece of music!" She's right - this is the kind of music that brings lumps to the throat.

    Despite the soft moods, the drums are very prominent in Paatos's music. Not surprising, since that is songwriter Ricard Nettermalm's instrument. For the rest -think of a blending of Portishead, Morte Macabre (the alma mater of some of the band members) Landberk (also the previous home of part of the lineup), and perhaps a smattering of Anglagaard and Anekdoten. Imagine that blend played with something of a minimalist style and float in that light and airy, soft and relaxed singing, and you have Paatos.

    Timeloss is 5 songs played in a short 39 minutes. All of the pieces are soft and elegant, with instruments as diverse as Mellotron, cello, flute. sax, trumpet, harmonium and trombone. But it is the 12 minute closing track "Quits" that might grab your attention. It develops from modern Swedish symph-prog into an avant garde piece featuring a long drum and bass solo followed by 5 minutes of a chaotic mix of sax, trombone, trumpet, bass and wild percussion, punctuated with bits of electronica. You can easily imagine this passage as a soundtrack to a frightening ghost movie - and while "Téa" will rock the kids to sleep, "Quits" will have them waking up with nightmares. It's a fascinating 5 minutes of intensely dark minor key mayhem that showcases the band's range more than the rest of the CD put together.
    As mentioned above, and with reference to the comments about "Quits", I said :
    "...and while "Téa" will rock the kids to sleep, "Quits" will have them waking up with nightmares."
    Regards,

    Duncan

  8. #8
    Member helicase's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    157
    Excellent album. Téa and Quits couldn't be more different, but I love them both. Kallocain I also like. They lost me after that, though.

    When I saw them live (can't remember when exactly), I was rather underwhelmed. Can't say there was anything wrong with the gig, just didn't really enjoy it. I picked up their live album later, not expecting too much, but to my surprise I do enjoy it quite a lot.

  9. #9
    cunning linguist 3LockBox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    hiding out in treetops, shouting out rude names
    Posts
    1,998
    Quote Originally Posted by Sputnik View Post
    Sometimes a bit too laid-back, almost like Lanberk on quaaludes, if you get more laid back they'll have to check for your pulse.
    agreed

    But I could always count on Quits to wake me up, just in time to rush to the player and shut that crap off. Dreadful song, imo, totally not in keeping with the rest of the album, and not of any interest to me what-so-ever. "I want a dance pop song on my Prog album," said no one ever.
    Dance song? Not on my planet. I actually find it very engaging at first but at over 12min in length it wears out its welcome with me. Sounds great on a good audio rig though.

  10. #10
    Member rickawakeman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    West of Worcester (Western Massachusetts)
    Posts
    620
    I have this but haven't spun it in years. Re-visit.

  11. #11
    I've kept the vinyl and probably spin it ca. once a year.

    It's still a reasonably good record, much due to Reine Fiske's involvement in both the writing/playing department. His input on the opening track ("Sensor") features among his finest performances overall, and paired with that frenetic drumming towards the end of the song it makes for a magnificently intense, almost euphoric sense of sound. I enjoy the vast contrast between "Tea" (a nursery for the Nettermalm's' infant daughter at the time and consequently in Swedish, as I recall) and "Quits" as well.

    But altogether I'm not too sure about the standing valor of their basic concept. To merge a decidedly "post-progressive" aesthetic with that of contemporary yet now outdated "retro dub" - Portishead, Tricky and Massive Attack being some of their main influences - might have seemed like a bright idea back in 2001, yet there's undeniably something slightly forced or almost even artificial about that motive now. I was never insane about Petronella's vocal timbre to begin with, although she's technically a very good singer.

    Ironically, signing with the decidedly "proggy-prog" InsideOut arguably sealed their potential with anyone else but that very audience. Kallocain was fairly OK, but they appeared to face serious problems of renewal following that.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  12. #12
    Member Kcrimso's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Espoo, Finland
    Posts
    980
    Quite good album but their other stuff does not work for me.
    "A waste of talent and electricity." John Peel on ELP

  13. #13
    This isn't for me. It sounds extremely dated and calculated. I don't mind at all the merging of Prog with current music forms of the mainstream, but as SS pointed out, it feels forced and unnatural in their case.

    Of course the main issue is the vocals for me, that verge towards the sentimental. And it's a pity because there are some beautiful moments, like Tea or the second part of Hypnotique. But Quits? Please! Complete randomness.

    Next one please.

  14. #14
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    in a cosmic jazzy-groove around Brussels
    Posts
    4,018
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post

    Ironically, signing with the decidedly "proggy-prog" InsideOut arguably sealed their potential with anyone else but that very audience. Kallocain was fairly OK, but they appeared to face serious problems of renewal following that.
    Good points with Trip Hop connections.

    TBH, I've only got two albums left: Timeloss (which indeed isn't "timeless" ) and the live Sensors (surprisingly good given its recording time in the band's history). I parted with Kallocain (only really liked the opening Gasoline, the rest was soporific) and the third one.

    Quote Originally Posted by Zappathustra View Post
    Next one please.
    coming up this sunday
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from drug-addicts to complete nutcases.

  15. #15
    Subterranean Tapir Hobo Chang Ba's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Frownland
    Posts
    1,036
    I only remember liking Quits. But I haven't listened to this album in over a decade.
    No humor please, we're skittish.

    Never let good music get in the way of making a profit.

  16. #16
    Member bill g's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Near Mount Rainier
    Posts
    2,308
    I always really liked this album. For some reason it kind of reminded me of King Crimson just a bit.

  17. #17
    Guess I'm in the minority but I love it! I find them classy, tasteful and intriguing, though I'm not sure they ever hit the heights of this debut again.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •