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Thread: Univers Zero Neglected Prog

  1. #26
    Member The Czar's Avatar
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    I've bought everything Univers Zero that cuneiform put out on cd since finding them in 1998.
    Heresie is a damn fine album, but everything up to Heatwave is fantastic.
    But Heresie deserves the praise it gets

  2. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    Next you're gonna tell me that Doctor Who isn't the greatest TV show of all time!
    I always liked Doctor Who, but I didn't really "get" the intensity of appeal until I had a girlfriend 17 years my junior who was a -major- fan and kept expecting for everyone else to adjust to her logic.

    What would be the US equivalent? Star Trek, perhaps?

    Damn, that Quincy M.E. must be the best ever.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  3. #28
    Member Monet's Avatar
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    One shouldn't be too harsh towards good ol' folks for which the term prog still means the genre that was once globally known as 'symphonic rock'. After all, the abbreviation 'prog' went into use as synonymous with symphonic rock and only later the meaning expanded (did it?)
    However, Univers Zero aren't neglected at all. On the contrary, those gifted Belgians are highly valued and respected among their dedicated 'rock in opposition' circles.

  4. #29
    Member Camelogue's Avatar
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    Loved by those who like it, neglected by those who don't.

    I always used to lament when I used to watch a lot of television, that the shows that I liked were always cancelled fairly quickly. (Nothing Sacred, Prey for example)

    What we like is not always liked by the masses or even semi-masses in the case of "Progressive" music.

  5. #30
    I'm just glad there are two UZ threads on here at the same time!

    Does anyone else but me include the two DD albums in the whole UZ oeuvre? I always figured he got fed up with all of the band hassles and just started using his own name but then realized UZ had stronger name recognition. ALL speculation by me of course!

    Since no one asked, here's my UZ album list ranking (no bad albums at all in my opinion):

    UZED
    Heresie
    Ceux Du Dehors
    1313
    Heatwave
    Relaps
    Crawling Wind
    Phosphorescent Dreams
    Clivages
    Live
    Les Eaux Troubles
    Implosion
    Rhythmix
    The Hard Quest
    Sirius and the Ghosts

  6. #31
    Member Zeuhlmate's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by selfextraction View Post
    I'm just glad there are two UZ threads on here at the same time!

    Does anyone else but me include the two DD albums in the whole UZ oeuvre? I always figured he got fed up with all of the band hassles and just started using his own name but then realized UZ had stronger name recognition. ALL speculation by me of course!

    Since no one asked, here's my UZ album list ranking (no bad albums at all in my opinion):

    UZED
    Heresie
    Ceux Du Dehors
    1313
    Heatwave
    Relaps
    Crawling Wind
    Phosphorescent Dreams
    Clivages
    Live
    Les Eaux Troubles
    Implosion
    Rhythmix
    The Hard Quest
    Sirius and the Ghosts
    If you are a UZ-fanboy, the 2 solos are mandatory, but I find them whithout the band-feel, and the compositions are not quite as strong.
    I have them and enjoy them from time to time.

  7. #32
    While I wouldn't exactly include DD's two solo records on the UZ roster, they're certainly somewhat close in spirit - quite naturally. I always liked them, and as opposed to most (that I'm aware of) I actually prefer the keys-heavy/drums-lite Sirius over the very good Troubles. In a sense I feel that the often less percussive nature of much of Sirius' music displays an aspect of harmonic sensitivity not so prominent on many other creations of DD. As if he decided to explore the keys over the tams in a deliberate compositional and conceptual manouvre.

    I need to listen again soon, it's been a bit too long.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  8. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by Monet View Post
    One shouldn't be too harsh towards good ol' folks for which the term prog still means the genre that was once globally known as 'symphonic rock'. After all, the abbreviation 'prog' went into use as synonymous with symphonic rock and only later the meaning expanded (did it?)
    Historically speaking it was precisely the other way 'round, something safe to say with today's ruling paradigms on the subject. And it really has been academically scrutinized to the point of dull, for instance here in Norway where there's at least half-a-dozen recent master thesises treating this exact issue.

    The "prog equals symph" conjunction itself actually is the revisionist stance, conjured up as a rather frictional dynamic between commercialist-cultural accumulations of apparent reappearance (through so-called "neo") in the 80s and then-current positions on the "bad" of the previous decade's' apparent excesses of pretention and socio-economic transcendence in trends. The definitions and consequent adherences of "progressive" in the phase 1968-75 were -far- wider and more eclectically "libertarian" than anything that followed. It becomes quite clear that the term didn't denote a singular stylistic or taxonomic concept at all during that era, but called for specifications of descriptive velocities of constant development; "symphonic", "avant-garde", "techno-flash", "art-rock" etc.

    As a rule, I think, the main mark of reference would be each given artist's source of direct influence. Univers Zero's were as much KC, Magma and '69-period Soft Machine as they were Albert Huybrechts, Stravinsky and Béla Bartók, IIRC - and I never got around to whether or not they'd ever heard Henry Cow or the Third Ear Band, for instance.

    For better or worse, those first four UZ's are sheer musical and cultural murder. In the most positive sense. They were as anarchist and decisive in their art-damage strategies as any imaginable punk-group at that stage.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  9. #34
    Member Monet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    Historically speaking it was precisely the other way 'round, something safe to say with today's ruling paradigms on the subject. And it really has been academically scrutinized to the point of dull, for instance here in Norway where there's at least half-a-dozen recent master thesises treating this exact issue.

    The "prog equals symph" conjunction itself actually is the revisionist stance, conjured up as a rather frictional dynamic between commercialist-cultural accumulations of apparent reappearance (through so-called "neo") in the 80s and then-current positions on the "bad" of the previous decade's' apparent excesses of pretention and socio-economic transcendence in trends. The definitions and consequent adherences of "progressive" in the phase 1968-75 were -far- wider and more eclectically "libertarian" than anything that followed. It becomes quite clear that the term didn't denote a singular stylistic or taxonomic concept at all during that era, but called for specifications of descriptive velocities of constant development; "symphonic", "avant-garde", "techno-flash", "art-rock" etc.

    As a rule, I think, the main mark of reference would be each given artist's source of direct influence. Univers Zero's were as much KC, Magma and '69-period Soft Machine as they were Albert Huybrechts, Stravinsky and Béla Bartók, IIRC - and I never got around to whether or not they'd ever heard Henry Cow or the Third Ear Band, for instance.

    For better or worse, those first four UZ's are sheer musical and cultural murder. In the most positive sense. They were as anarchist and decisive in their art-damage strategies as any imaginable punk-group at that stage.
    Well you know that the abbreviations often get different meanings. This happened with the abbreviation 'prog' which wasn't in use prior to the neo-prog movement. In the late 60s, 'Progressive music', as the original term, at first meant almost everything that was played on the Underground scene. Simple as that, progressive music and Underground music were synonymous in the late 60s and hence 'progressive' tag really marked a variety of styles, what was absolutely fine back then. But the term 'neo-progressive' was synonymous with British Symphonic Rock Revival which got a relative success in the 80s and therefore for many fans the word 'progressive' has been stripped of its original meaning.

  10. #35
    ^ I know.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  11. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by Zeuhlmate View Post
    If you are a UZ-fanboy, the 2 solos are mandatory, but I find them whithout the band-feel, and the compositions are not quite as strong.
    I have them and enjoy them from time to time.
    I'm definitely a fanboy here! Much of the second album has a band feel I think. And the track A L'Ombre du Zed from Sirius is fantastic. Love the production on that one. Real ear candy.

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