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Thread: Richard Palmer-James - his life after Supertramp

  1. #26
    Getting back to the session musician thing: ya know, some of the guys who were in some of the more famous Anglo bands also did some weird sessions. Steve Howe I guess must have gotten friendly with Trevor Horn, because Steve guested on the first Frankie Goes To Hollywood album and at least one other Horn related project (I forget what it was, but he said he played his fretless Fender Jazzmaster, and "There may actually be some of it present in that quagmire of a mix", which suggests to me that Steve himself is doubtful that his contribution actually made it into the final mix).

    And I think Bruford might regard things like ABWH and the Union album and tour (and possibly his presence in 80's/90's King Crimson to be) "the day job", i.e. something he did to get a big paycheck so he could go off and do what he wanted to do on his solo records. I think he said there was a tradition of that in jazz, so he considered it an acceptable way to go about things.

  2. #27
    ^ The Frankie album is good, but the Howe participation people really need to hear is "Murder of Love" on Propaganda's A Secret Wish. Other excellent tunes on that one too, and certainly NOT "prog" but bonafide grandiose synth-pop arching over Weimar-Berliner cultural atmospheres, Murnau expressionist visions, Nietzschean nocturnal lore, echoes of inimitable BDR pornography and, well, the shallow strains of bygone "symphonic" rock pomp. The band still keeps reforming on occasion solely to perform bits of that record. To my ears, Howe's solo here was his finest contribution to the 80s overall.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  3. #28
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    ^ The Frankie album is good, but the Howe participation people really need to hear is "Murder of Love" on Propaganda's A Secret Wish. Other excellent tunes on that one too, and certainly NOT "prog" but bonafide grandiose synth-pop arching over Weimar-Berliner cultural atmospheres, Murnau expressionist visions, Nietzschean nocturnal lore, echoes of inimitable BDR pornography and, well, the shallow strains of bygone "symphonic" rock pomp. The band still keeps reforming on occasion solely to perform bits of that record. To my ears, Howe's solo here was his finest contribution to the 80s overall.
    Back in the day, I recall seeing their albums in the bins with regularity, but I never paid them any attention. And of course never heard anything by them through mainstream channels. So, I'm giving this a listen based on your post, and I think I'm going to need to get this. (Not for the Howe bit, but for the overall package.)
    "If you want to see the true nature of humanity, just look at the internet."

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  4. #29
    The greatest of ALL Luc Besson, and the greatest thing Christoph Lambert did for himself except for marrying Diane Lane:


    But you turn the sound off here and fire up the next video I post, 'cause that's how "The Murder of Love" appeared in the European edition of the film. The song was was not allowed for use in the US Version, and consequently replaced by some other dittie.


    The European rendition has this one running in that scene:
    Last edited by Scrotum Scissor; 2 Days Ago at 11:10 AM.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

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