Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: Roger Daltrey's Thanks a lot Mr Kibblewhite

  1. #1

    Roger Daltrey's Thanks a lot Mr Kibblewhite

    Just finished reading Roger's book.. there may be another thread I missed when this book was first released back in 2018. A lot of good info covered.. One thing that kept coming up thru out the book was how broke Roger was.. he was always nudging Pete to go on tour so he could have some money.. likewise John seemed to burn thru his money rather quickly.. Pete obviously had the lions share of the publishing so touring wasn't his main bread and butter..

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Kalamazoo Michigan
    Posts
    3,775
    I read it a while back and really enjoyed it. I have also read Pete's book and Kenny Jones book. 3 different perspectives on the same band. It sounds like Entwistle blew through his money even faster.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by happytheman View Post
    Just finished reading Roger's book.. there may be another thread I missed when this book was first released back in 2018. A lot of good info covered.. One thing that kept coming up thru out the book was how broke Roger was.. he was always nudging Pete to go on tour so he could have some money.. likewise John seemed to burn thru his money rather quickly.. Pete obviously had the lions share of the publishing so touring wasn't his main bread and butter..
    The line I remember hearing was that Thunderfingers continued to live like a rock star, even after The Who stopped touring and recording. He went out on tour as a solo artist, but lost money doing that. The story I always heard was the reason they got back together to tour in 1989 was because John was in danger of losing his house. I think I read he eventually had to downsize from the big English manor you see in The Kids Are Alright, to more modest accommodations, and I believe he also had to sell some of his bass and guitar collection.

  4. #4
    Member Koreabruce's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Chuncheon, South Korea
    Posts
    752
    I really enjoyed Roger's autobiography. Besides all of the inside info on the Who, I was also impressed by how much of a handyman he was/is. His descriptions of what he did to refurbish that huge house he bought were fascinating. I was also amused and somewhat shocked by the story of him getting a very quick "crash-course" in hang gliding for that bit in the Tommy film and then going on to pull it off rather well, minus any kind of safety gear. I too hadn't realized that they, i.e. everyone except Pete, had a lot less money to their names that one would have expected even considering how gangster the music biz was in the 60s and 70s.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by SteveSly View Post
    I read it a while back and really enjoyed it. I have also read Pete's book and Kenny Jones book. 3 different perspectives on the same band. It sounds like Entwistle blew through his money even faster.
    Force of habit, no?

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Kalamazoo Michigan
    Posts
    3,775
    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    The line I remember hearing was that Thunderfingers continued to live like a rock star, even after The Who stopped touring and recording. He went out on tour as a solo artist, but lost money doing that. The story I always heard was the reason they got back together to tour in 1989 was because John was in danger of losing his house. I think I read he eventually had to downsize from the big English manor you see in The Kids Are Alright, to more modest accommodations, and I believe he also had to sell some of his bass and guitar collection.
    Yup, that is pretty accurate. Thunderfingers died in a hotel room in Vegas with a hooker and a mound of cocaine. If ya gotta go I guess..........

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Kalamazoo Michigan
    Posts
    3,775
    Quote Originally Posted by Halmyre View Post
    Force of habit, no?

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    34
    Quote Originally Posted by Halmyre View Post
    Force of habit, no?
    Well, if you want to live like a Rock Star, you need to successfully tour (i.e.: bring in $$$$). It's not like The Stones do these huge tours, because they "love to perform". If they did, they would do a tour of small theaters.... (not that there is anything wrong with that).

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by pbs1902 View Post
    Well, if you want to live like a Rock Star, you need to successfully tour (i.e.: bring in $$$$). It's not like The Stones do these huge tours, because they "love to perform". If they did, they would do a tour of small theaters.... (not that there is anything wrong with that).
    Oh, I think the Stones love touring. THey love the crowd and the energy of their live shows... Seems like I heard that they want to tour until they drop.

    I need to read Rogers book...Thanks for the info.
    I got nothin'

    ...avoiding any implication that I have ever entertained a cognizant thought.

    live samples:
    https://soundcloud.com/yodelgoat/yod...om-a-live-show
    https://www.facebook.com/pg/PapaYode...=page_internal

  10. #10
    Yes, songwriters make A LOT OF $$$$ if their songs are played on the radio (at least until streaming started). Non-songwriter band members make most of $$ from touring and merchandise. Record Companies make money on record/CD sales and the band/producer/manager makes anything after the advance is paid back to the Record Co (pennies per album). At least that's how it used to work. Now, not sure. I suspect most albums are merely bait to get fans to gigs/tours and maybe some streaming revenue.

    A band is a partnership - Pete would not make as much $$ from his songs without Roger's vocals, Keith's insane drumming, and Thunderfinger's fingers. These guys are not session musicians. I'm sure all of them were a team in arranging, writing, recording, throwing around ideas to make a final composition.

    My Love Open the Door ain't no Won't Get Fooled Again.

  11. #11
    Member since March 2004 mozo-pg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    10,491
    Quote Originally Posted by Adinfinitum View Post
    My Love Open the Door ain't no Won't Get Fooled Again.
    Apples and Oranges. I love em both.
    What can this strange device be? When I touch it, it brings forth a sound.

  12. #12
    Ride a Rock horse was no Who's Next.
    I got nothin'

    ...avoiding any implication that I have ever entertained a cognizant thought.

    live samples:
    https://soundcloud.com/yodelgoat/yod...om-a-live-show
    https://www.facebook.com/pg/PapaYode...=page_internal

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Adinfinitum View Post
    Yes, songwriters make A LOT OF $$$$ if their songs are played on the radio (at least until streaming started). Non-songwriter band members make most of $$ from touring and merchandise. Record Companies make money on record/CD sales and the band/producer/manager makes anything after the advance is paid back to the Record Co (pennies per album). At least that's how it used to work. Now, not sure. I suspect most albums are merely bait to get fans to gigs/tours and maybe some streaming revenue.

    A band is a partnership - Pete would not make as much $$ from his songs without Roger's vocals, Keith's insane drumming, and Thunderfinger's fingers. These guys are not session musicians. I'm sure all of them were a team in arranging, writing, recording, throwing around ideas to make a final composition.
    .
    I think it depends on exactly which song you're talking about. Some of those tunes Pete had pretty much worked out, judging from the demos that appear on the Scoop releases. Others, I think he probably let the others contribute more to. I somehow don't imagine he dictated something like the bass playing on a song like Dreaming From The Waist to John.

    But I think that's true of most of bands. I think most groups had musicains whose names didn't appear in the bylines but they were still contributing to the music. I can't imagine Ian Anderson dictated every note of any given Jethro Tull song to the other band members.

    I think this is one place where a lot of legal issues came up later on. For instance, you had that situation with Whiter Shade Of Pale, where Matthew Fisher eventually sued Gary Brooker and Keith Reid, because Fisher's organ part was deemed an integral part of the song.

    And it's Sting screwed Andy Summers' out of millions of dollars by not including Andy in the publishing for Every Breath You Take. Never mind how much money Andy could have made just from the sales and airplay of The Police song, it became a bigger issue when it was his guitar riff (which Andy himself composed, it wasn't part of the song that Sting had initially) was sampled in that Puff Daddy song.

    Getting back to The Who, I remember reading where Entwistle made a comment to the effect that he started writing songs specifically for Roger Daltrey to sing, as a means of "getting more than one song onto any given album". This would suggest that maybe perhaps Pete wasn't sharing the publishing royalties with the other three.

    And I know I've read that was a bone of contention with the members of Queen, and apparently, lots of other groups, too. In the case of Queen, Freddie and Brian wrote tmost of the of songs, and as such, their tunes were the ones usually chosen for singles. One suspects the reason I'm In Love With My Car was the B-side of Bohemian Rhapsody was probably that Roger Taylor was probalby griping about never getting one of his songs onto a single. Note also that it's been said that John Deacon "broke his vows of silence" to let be known he wanted his song You're My Best Friend, to be a single, presumably for similar reasons. Course, John later wrote Another One Bites The Dust and Roger later wrote Radio Ga-Ga, so they got their day in court on that front.

    I've heard it suggested that songwriting credits, and I guess specifically publishing royalties are one of the main reasons bands break up. I also imagine it's the reason why somr musicians leave bands, when they get it in their head they've got the ability to come up with an album's worth of songs on a regular basis, and not be relegated to having just one or two songs (if even that) on a given record.

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Coventry, UK
    Posts
    112
    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    I think it depends on exactly which song you're talking about. Some of those tunes Pete had pretty much worked out, judging from the demos that appear on the Scoop releases. Others, I think he probably let the others contribute more to. I somehow don't imagine he dictated something like the bass playing on a song like Dreaming From The Waist to John.

    But I think that's true of most of bands. I think most groups had musicains whose names didn't appear in the bylines but they were still contributing to the music. I can't imagine Ian Anderson dictated every note of any given Jethro Tull song to the other band members.

    I think this is one place where a lot of legal issues came up later on. For instance, you had that situation with Whiter Shade Of Pale, where Matthew Fisher eventually sued Gary Brooker and Keith Reid, because Fisher's organ part was deemed an integral part of the song.

    And it's Sting screwed Andy Summers' out of millions of dollars by not including Andy in the publishing for Every Breath You Take. Never mind how much money Andy could have made just from the sales and airplay of The Police song, it became a bigger issue when it was his guitar riff (which Andy himself composed, it wasn't part of the song that Sting had initially) was sampled in that Puff Daddy song.

    Getting back to The Who, I remember reading where Entwistle made a comment to the effect that he started writing songs specifically for Roger Daltrey to sing, as a means of "getting more than one song onto any given album". This would suggest that maybe perhaps Pete wasn't sharing the publishing royalties with the other three.

    And I know I've read that was a bone of contention with the members of Queen, and apparently, lots of other groups, too. In the case of Queen, Freddie and Brian wrote tmost of the of songs, and as such, their tunes were the ones usually chosen for singles. One suspects the reason I'm In Love With My Car was the B-side of Bohemian Rhapsody was probably that Roger Taylor was probalby griping about never getting one of his songs onto a single. Note also that it's been said that John Deacon "broke his vows of silence" to let be known he wanted his song You're My Best Friend, to be a single, presumably for similar reasons. Course, John later wrote Another One Bites The Dust and Roger later wrote Radio Ga-Ga, so they got their day in court on that front.

    I've heard it suggested that songwriting credits, and I guess specifically publishing royalties are one of the main reasons bands break up. I also imagine it's the reason why somr musicians leave bands, when they get it in their head they've got the ability to come up with an album's worth of songs on a regular basis, and not be relegated to having just one or two songs (if even that) on a given record.
    Roy Babbington left Soft Machine because he wasn't making much money from the record sales and they didn't tour enough. (That's according to that book published a few years back.)

    I've read that Ian Anderson does pay royalties to members of the band who composed parts of songs.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Harbottle View Post

    I've read that Ian Anderson does pay royalties to members of the band who composed parts of songs.
    Well, that's good to know. I always wondered how that all worked out, because Ian's name is typically the only one in the byline, so I always wondered what the others contributed. Like I said, I can't imagine he was dictating stuff like Thick As A Brick or A Passion Play to them note for note, but one always wondered about things like the instrumental bits, did Ian just sort of say "Oh, I've got this melody that goes..." and then hum something and they worked up an arrangement in rehearsal or the recording studio, or did you ahve things where Evans, Palmer, Barre, et al come up with ideas, say John Evans says "Oh, I've got an idea for a musical bit that can come after that vocal section" or whatever. Or let's say Ian's late for a rehearsal and arrives to hear the lads jamming on something and says "Oh, we could use that as the intro" or whatever.

    I think it was Rick Wakeman who said you should never trust the bylines on the Yes records.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •