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Thread: Featured Album: Obras De Violeta Parra - Los Jaivas

  1. #1
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
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    Featured Album: Obras De Violeta Parra - Los Jaivas

    http://www.progarchives.com/progress...2113112009.jpg

    lets move on south of the double continent.

    jaivas.jpg

    Los Jaivas - Obras De Violeta Parra

    Tracks Listing
    1. Arauco Tiene una Pena (11:07)
    2. El Guillatún (8:47)
    3. Mañana me Voy Pa'l Norte (4:40)
    4. Y Arriba Quemando el Sol (11:03)
    5. El Gavilán (11:43)
    6. Un Rio de Sangre (8:28)
    7. Run-Run se Fue Pa'l Norte (5:14)
    8. En los Jardines Humanos (9:35)
    9. Violeta Ausente (5:06)

    Line-up
    - Eduardo "Gato" Alquinta / lead & backing vocals, electric & acoustic guitars, quena, ocarina, tarka, siku, flute (runrunera), trutruca, moceño, sleigh bells
    - Eduardo Parra / electric piano, piano, Mini-Moog, trutruca, tambourine
    - Claudio Parra / piano, electric piano, Mini-Moog, accordion, maracas
    - Mario Mutis / bass, acoustic guitar, trutruca, ocarina, siku, moceño, cultrun, bells, kalimba, vocals
    - Gabriel Parra / drums, timpani, bombo legüero, orchestral bass drum, ratchet, charango, trutruca, moceño, vocals

    With:
    - Isabel Parra / lead vocals & cuatro (6)
    - Patricio Castillo / co-arranger & acoustic guitar & backing vocals (6)

    Here is what Clem Of Nazareth had to sau on ProgArchives
    I have four Los Jaivas albums; their self-titled from the seventies, two (including this one) from the eighties, and ‘Arrebol’ from 2001. I’m amazed how much the band changes from decade to decade, more so than many other groups that span the same timeframe. Sure, Genesis evolved from being the prototype prog band to a schmaltzy pop act, and Jethro Tull grew from basically a blues band to quintessential prog folk to almost a parody of prog and back to folk again. But with Los Jaivas the transitions all still fall well within the realm of very progressive and respectable music, just distinctly different over a nearly forty year period. And at least until Gato Alquinta’s passing, with largely the same lineup.
    While the band’s earliest work is pretty earthy folk steeped in Chilean tradition, the latter stuff is quite modern-sounding and features more than a little keyboard and synthesized sounds. ‘Obras de Violeta Parra’ falls somewhere in between, with glimmers of modernity while still clinging like hopeless romantics to their national roots. And sure, there are Moogs and electric pianos and a celeste and electric guitars; but the band has managed to retain the authenticity and unique sounds of the charango, the Mapuchean trutrucas and even some mandolin. One thing that seems to remain constant with Los Jaivas is their love and skillfull employment of exotic and rich-sounding instruments and percussion, something they do with abundance here.

    Its also a good thing CDs came out when they did, since this thing runs on for nearly seventy-seven minutes including three songs clocking in at over ten minutes each. The first (“Arauco Tiene una Pena”) is rich with keyboards, lush percussion and various stringed instruments, and pretty sparse on vocals. At times it almost wanders into symphonic rock territory. The follow-up “Ell Guillatun” is undeniably symphonic, with a sprightly piano chord progression that builds and evolves the entire length of the song as guitar, xylophone and a wispy recorder dance around the basic arrangement. Toward the end the drums and other percussion build to a sort of multifaceted climax before ending abruptly. “Run Run se Fue pal Norte” is another symphonic piece, as is “En los Jardones Humanos”; both are a little shorter and with what sounds like some synthesized keyboards mixed with piano and celeste, but a nice songs overall.

    On the other hand, “Y Arriba Quemando el Sol” is the other long song, but this one has multiple vocals track, more of a folk piano line, and an almost martial tempo. I can’t say as this one adds much to the overall appeal of the album, and frankly the record would have been complete even without it. One thing that comes out in “Y Arriba Quemando el Sol” though is the presence of some brass, something that is more prevalent on the second half of the disc. Those songs are shorter (though a few are still around 8-9 minutes); there are also more vocals on most of the latter tracks. There are also a couple of more modern-sounding, pop-folk numbers stuck on the album for some reason (“Manana me voy pal Norte” and “Violeta Ausente”). Nothing wrong with these, they just don’t quite fit the mood of the rest of the work.

    The band wraps recorder around piano on the closing “Que Pena Siente el Alma” and sprinkles in a little taste of vocals for the closest they come to their seventies sound. I really like this one as a closing number; it is upbeat, has a kind of playful piano sequence, and seems to be designed to leave the listener feeling good as the music winds to a close. Well played and something I expect the band performed in concert regularly (although regrettably I never had the opportunity to see them live).

    I won’t say this is my favorite Los Jaivas album, and it’s just a slight bit uneven considering the two or three short non-folksy songs. But in whole the music is nearly as appealing as some of their earlier work, even if it is quite a bit more formal and with a symphonic structure. Four stars I think, and well recommended to symphonic and prog folk fans alike, as well as anyone who finds acts like Triana, Amenophis or maybe even Ekseption appealing.

    peace




    Last edited by Trane; 2 Weeks Ago at 12:24 PM.
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from drug-addicts to complete nutcases.

  2. #2
    I had El Indio and Alturas De Machu Picchu by these guys, but never tracked down Violeta Parra. I don't own any Los Jaivas anymore, and listening to the second sample above for Mañana me Voy Pa'l Norte reminds me why I probably don't. I can only take so much of this traditional stuff, and these guys lean a bit too far on the "folk/traditional" side for my tastes. Not enough rock, not enough Prog.

    Also, while there are some tasty moments in the first sample, Gavilán, it doesn't really flow as a piece to me, and never really gets cooking. I think that's what I found about even their best stuff, it just doesn't move me like other stuff from South America that does incorporate traditional elements, but has a much more pervasive rock orientation, and to me is better composed and executed.

    Sorry I didn't like this band more, I really do love a lot of South American bands, Chilean in particular. But, so it goes.

    Bill

  3. #3
    While I still like this one, I think it falls a bit short of their rather excellent 1977-82 trio of Cancion Del Sur, Alturas and Aconcagua.

    Certainly no wonder why a Chilean ensemble in (more or less forced) exile would want to pay homage to the great Violeta P., yet I quite agree with Bill here ^ that this mammoth release probably veers somewhat to heavily into "straighter" realms of Andean folk musics. I know for a fact though that this is one of their most treasured issues with Chileans, with whom Los Jaivas were huge to begin with; a "lesser" artist would arguably risk a beating for trying on anything near as ambitious as this homage to V.P.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  4. #4
    Member TheH's Avatar
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    A good Album, but as Richard I like the Albums before this one a bit more.

    Apart from the ones already mentioned their third one "El Indio" (actually it has no real Name)
    is also very good.

    Also just found this one:

    Last edited by TheH; 2 Weeks Ago at 01:36 PM.

  5. #5
    Casanova TCC's Avatar
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    Good call Trane!.

    - I love Violeta Parra (1917-1967). I love Los Jaivas!. -

    I can write a lot about this album, about its lyrics, which is perhaps the most "political album" made by Los Jaivas and how through this excellent tribute of 10 songs of the Chilean singer and songwriter Violeta del Carmen Parra Sandoval, they take her music one step further incorporating new sections, highlighting others and adding excellent arrangements to the music recorded by Violeta Parra accompanied only by her guitar many times: a simple and even primitive sound but it is quite the opposite because her songs are rich in harmonies, melodies and obviously with great lyrics; a good example is "El Gavilàn".



    - Los Jaivas’ version:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EoQ3...ture=emb_title

    "Obras de Violeta Parra" is a favorite here, a master piece IMO along with “El Indio”, "Canción del Sur" and "Alturas de Machu Picchu".


    - Finally, a recommendation:
    Violeta Parra - Composiciones para Guitarra" or later "Obras para Guitarra". (1957-1960)


    "This is her most experimental album in which there are no songs in the conventional format but composed songs for solo guitar, or voice and guitar: Violeta escapes the traditional forms of "traditional music" and literally invents new forms of musicalization with a distant base in Chilean folklore."


    Regards,
    Tomàs.
    Last edited by TCC; 2 Weeks Ago at 04:31 PM.

  6. #6
    Member helicase's Avatar
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    Love this album. Second only to Alturas for me.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by TCC View Post
    Good call Trane!.

    - I love Violeta Parra (1917-1967). I love Los Jaivas!. -

    I can write a lot about this album, about its lyrics, which is perhaps the most "political album" made by Los Jaivas and how through this excellent tribute of 10 songs of the Chilean singer and songwriter Violeta del Carmen Parra Sandoval, they take her music one step further incorporating new sections, highlighting others and adding excellent arrangements to the music recorded by Violeta Parra accompanied only by her guitar many times: a simple and even primitive sound but it is quite the opposite because her songs are rich in harmonies, melodies and obviously with great lyrics; a good example is "El Gavilàn".
    One of the great south-american rock bands for me. I love Cansion del Sur - it contains music that destroys me emotionally. I don't know the album that is being discussed here - but what is most significant I am not familiar with the music of Violeta. I just listened to Gavilan and I am in complete awe. Where should I go forward with this goddess of music?

  8. #8
    Member Since: 3/27/2002 MYSTERIOUS TRAVELLER's Avatar
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    I own every Los Jaivas album and dig the SA Folk influences they mix with Rock. They do a better job of blending the two than say... Tribu
    Why is it whenever someone mentions an artist that was clearly progressive (yet not the Symph weenie definition of Prog) do certain people feel compelled to snort "thats not Prog" like a whiny 5th grader?

  9. #9
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    Don't know a whole lot about them but I have this record and I really like it. I also own Alturas and Violeta Parra. Is all their stuff this good? (Asking for a friend...)
    Prog's Not Dead

  10. #10
    Casanova TCC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zappathustra View Post
    One of the great south-american rock bands for me. I love Cansion del Sur - it contains music that destroys me emotionally. I don't know the album that is being discussed here - but what is most significant I am not familiar with the music of Violeta. I just listened to Gavilan and I am in complete awe. Where should I go forward with this goddess of music?
    Hello Zappa!.
    Glad you like it.

    - Las Últimas Composiciones de Violeta Parra (1966).


    More:
    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...EF1A1348CD1096

    "It is the last album released in life by Violeta Parra; the album includes most of her best known songs such as "Gracias a la Vida","Run Run se fue pa’l norte", "Cantores que reflexionan", "Volver a los 17" y "La cueca de los poetas" which she wrote with his brother Nicanor Parra."
    (https://museovioletaparra.cl/cedoc/l...ta-parra-1966/)

    In April 2008, the Chilean edition of Rolling Stone magazine ranked the album as the best Chilean record of all time ... go figure!.

    - Recordando a Chile (una chilena en París) (1965)


    "Compositions by Violeta Parra, live music recorded in Geneva and Argentina."
    (https://museovioletaparra.cl/cedoc/r...lena-en-paris/)

    More:
    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...Orh7T-428ijVqk

    - Composiciones para Guitarra. (1957-1960)




    Enjoy,
    Tomás.
    Last edited by TCC; 2 Weeks Ago at 02:10 AM.
    Pura Vida!.

    There are two kinds of music. Good music, and the other kind. ∞
    Duke Ellington.

  11. #11
    This is one group I've never gotten around to, sadly. I've heard lots of praise for them, and especially their album Alturas de Macchu Picchu (among prog circles), but have never taken the plunge. I've decide to rectify that, and have found a few of their albums on Apple Music, so I'll begin listening to them today.

    Tomás, what are some of your favorites by them? Do you have any recommendations for a newbie such as myself?

  12. #12
    Casanova TCC's Avatar
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    Ok, my pleasure Aith01 and Miamiscot, this is my personal take:

    - La Vorágine. (5 cd box set: 1969 - 1970)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YDbJU-iholo

    Free and structured improvisation, avant-garde, electroacoustic music, noise, etc..
    Released 2004.

    - El Volantín (1971)
    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...EHKV7sLO5eA1eA

    First steps or experimentation with the traditional folk forms of Latin America and the structure and instrumentation of a rock band.

    - Manduka y Los Jaivas - Los Sueños de América (1974)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yu2hzVcZIDQ

    A fusion between folk roots and musical improvisation based on jazz and rock ... nice!.


    And you can't go wrong with:
    Los Jaivas or El Indio (1975), Canción del Sur (1977), Alturas de Machu Picchu (1981) and with Obras de Violeta Parra (1984).

    Special mentions:
    - Mamalluca (1999)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vJVwBZSrvJs

    It isn't their first one but it constitutes a formal musical work of the group with a full chamber orchestra.

    - En El Bar-Restaurant "Lo Que Nunca Se Supo" (2000)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RieO...w&index=2&t=0s

    - Los Jaivas en Moscú (1983)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D5YmQU5HOPw

    Live material.

    - Obras Cumbres (2002)
    2 cd compilation that contains music from all the musical stages of the band.


    Happy hunting,
    Tomás.
    Last edited by TCC; 2 Weeks Ago at 04:09 AM.
    Pura Vida!.

    There are two kinds of music. Good music, and the other kind. ∞
    Duke Ellington.

  13. #13
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TCC View Post
    I can write a lot about this album, about its lyrics, which is perhaps the most "political album" made by Los Jaivas and how through this excellent tribute of 10 songs of the Chilean singer and songwriter Violeta del Carmen Parra Sandoval, they take her music one step further incorporating new sections, highlighting others and adding excellent arrangements to the music recorded by Violeta Parra accompanied only by her guitar many times: a simple and even primitive sound but it is quite the opposite because her songs are rich in harmonies, melodies and obviously with great lyrics; a good example is "El Gavilàn".
    I'd love to hear/read more and I'm sure that if it does get a little political, it will be about music.

    Had never heard their Voragine debuts and it's fucking bloody wild. No wonder the Pinochet Junta licked them out of the country - way tooooo disruptive (ala early AD2 or AD alone stuff) for those conservatives fascists. Thx

    Have also yet to hear the Volatin album, I must confess

    Quote Originally Posted by helicase View Post
    Love this album. Second only to Alturas for me.
    Though I love Alturas, it's a little too cliché for me like the El Passo de Condor (heard them clichés a bit too much, probably), so I'd place Obras, Indio and Cancion ahead of it...

    Quote Originally Posted by Zappathustra View Post
    One of the great south-american rock bands for me. I love Cansion del Sur - it contains music that destroys me emotionally. I don't know the album that is being discussed here - but what is most significant I am not familiar with the music of Violeta. I just listened to Gavilan and I am in complete awe. Where should I go forward with this goddess of music?
    Yup, LJ 's more emotional tracks (often the longer tracks) always brings uncontrolable tears (sadness & joy at the same time), chills down the spine and goosebumps all-over, but I'm afraid I abused of those feelings for a couple of decades
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from drug-addicts to complete nutcases.

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Trane View Post
    No wonder the Pinochet Junta licked them out of the country - way tooooo disruptive (ala early AD2 or AD alone stuff) for those conservatives fascists.
    They basically had to go into exile, seeing as the whole band and crew were part of a musicians' union which again was linked to one of the parties of the ruling leftist coalition under Allende. Thousands of organized musicians were persecuted by the junta; folkies, jazzers, rockers - you name 'em. Popular music especially, but also serious art- and avant-garde expressions of sound - were seen as "subversive" and a menace to younger generations, infecting them with morally ambigious attitudes towards establishment and order. The ultra-conservative junta in Greece (1967-74) had done the exact same thing, but so did the concrete-bloc marxist ones in Eastern Europe; "radical" opposition was to be crushed no matter ideology. A trait of the authoritarian state itself.

    Quote Originally Posted by miamiscot View Post
    Is all their stuff this good?
    No. Cancion Del Sur is arguably their very best, though.

    And everyone here should also check out the lesser-known, but to me even more interesting (and more "experimental") brethren El Congreso. Both bands are extremely long-standing and have been highly influential on rock developments in Chile; Congreso are often referred to even by metal bands.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  15. #15
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    They basically had to go into exile, seeing as the whole band and crew were part of a musicians' union which again was linked to one of the parties of the ruling leftist coalition under Allende. Thousands of organized musicians were persecuted by the junta; folkies, jazzers, rockers - you name 'em. Popular music especially, but also serious art- and avant-garde expressions of sound - were seen as "subversive" and a menace to younger generations, infecting them with morally ambigious attitudes towards establishment and order. The ultra-conservative junta in Greece (1967-74) had done the exact same thing, but so did the concrete-bloc marxist ones in Eastern Europe; "radical" opposition was to be crushed no matter ideology. A trait of the authoritarian state itself.
    And yet the Franco regime was getting fairly laxist in its final years, letting its youth (often in contact with vacationing tourists) creating some wild & decadent music ... Though clearly, that aértistic fredom took on much speed after that arsehole's death. Not too aware whether the Portuguese dictatorship (Salazar) also cracked down on artistes, but most likely .
    Plastic People Of The Universe even went to jail a few times for playing concerts in Czeckia.

    No. Cancion Del Sur is arguably their very best, though.

    And everyone here should also check out the lesser-known, but to me even more interesting (and more "experimental") brethren El Congreso. Both bands are extremely long-standing and have been highly influential on rock developments in Chile; Congreso are often referred to even by metal bands.
    I've never finished investigating Congresso (there are still a couple album on my want-list), but they've never transported me the same way Jaivas did.
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from drug-addicts to complete nutcases.

  16. #16
    Casanova TCC's Avatar
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    Friends:
    I had forgotten why they are called "Los Jaivas", the story goes like this more or less:

    Their original name was "The High & Bass" which alluded to the differences in stature between the brothers Parra, Gato and Mario Mutis or, to the musicians, simply, "High-Bass" sounded very chic! .

    Finally castilianized around 1969 or 1971, they adopted Los Jaivas:
    High = Jai
    Vas = Bass


    Last edited by TCC; 1 Week Ago at 12:32 AM.

  17. #17
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
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    what a cool anectdote

    But what a myth breaker, too. I almost wish I hadn't known





    BTW, I'd have thought that by "bass" they meant low, thus the High-Lows
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from drug-addicts to complete nutcases.

  18. #18
    Casanova TCC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trane View Post
    what a cool anectdote

    But what a myth breaker, too. I almost wish I hadn't known


    Quote Originally Posted by Trane View Post
    BTW, I'd have thought that by "bass" they meant low, thus the High-Lows
    Well, at this point, it could be too Trane. (jeje)

    The name's translation is how those words sound in Spanish or in a Castilian Spanish form:

    - Jai - High
    - Vas - Bass, and,
    - The is Los.

    The High & Bass -- Los Jaivas.
    Last edited by TCC; 1 Week Ago at 10:20 AM.
    Pura Vida!.

    There are two kinds of music. Good music, and the other kind. ∞
    Duke Ellington.

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