Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 33

Thread: Earliest prog song to (lyrically) reference other prog

  1. #1

    Earliest prog song to (lyrically) reference other prog

    Obviously covers don’t count.

    The earliest I can find is “Footsteps” by Hoelderlin, from their 1979 album New Faces. Two references to PFM (“Chocolate kings” and “paper charms”) appear in the lyrics.
    Confirmed Bachelors: the dramedy hit of 1883...

  2. #2
    The version of Moon in June recorded by Soft Machine for John Peel's Top Gear show on BBC Radio on 10th June, 1969, & first broadcast on 15 June 1969, references Caravan, Kevin Gilbert & the Pink Floyd:

    Playing now is lovely
    Here in the BBC
    We're free to play almost as long and as loud
    As a jazz group, or an orchestra on Radio Three
    There are dancehalls and theatres
    With acoustics worse than here
    Not forgetting the extra facilities
    Such as the tea machine, just along the corridor
    So to all our mates like Kevin,
    Caravan, the old Pink Floyd
    Allow me to recommend 'Top Gear'
    Despite its extraordinary name
    Yes, playing, playing now is lovely
    Here in the BBC
    We're free to play almost as long and as loud
    As the foreign language classes... and the John Cage interview...
    And the jazz groups... and the orchestras on Radio 3

  3. #3
    Member Emeritus (A.M.P.) rcarlberg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    6,553
    Quote Originally Posted by per anporth View Post
    The version of Moon in June recorded by Soft Machine for John Peel's Top Gear show on BBC Radio on 10th June, 1969, & first broadcast on 15 June 1969, references Caravan, Kevin Gilbert & the Pink Floyd:
    Kevin Ayers, not Gilbert I reckon. Gilbert would've been three years old in 1969. I mean, he was a prodigy, but... he wasn't on "Top Gear" in nappies.
    Last edited by rcarlberg; 01-16-2020 at 09:51 PM.

  4. #4
    Member Emeritus (A.M.P.) rcarlberg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    6,553
    Mamas and The Papas, 1966, "Dancing In The Street":
    Or Long Barn they do that Riverdale, Cream you know (Yes, I know) Manchester?
    Mamas and The Papas, 1967, "Creeque Alley":
    John and Mitchie were gettin' kind of itchy
    Just to leave the folk music behind
    Zal and Denny workin' for a penny
    Tryin' to get a fish on the line
    In a coffee house Sebastian sat
    And after every number they'd pass the hat
    McGuinn and McGuire just a-gettin' higher in L.A
    You know where that's at
    And no one's gettin' fat except Mama Cass

  5. #5
    I told you about strawberry fields
    You know the place where nothing is real
    Well here's another place you can go
    Where everything flows.


    1968
    Orange is the new stupid.

  6. #6
    Member Emeritus (A.M.P.) rcarlberg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    6,553
    ^^Doesn't count. John was referencing himself.

    I'm wracking my brain trying to come up with a Syd Barrett lyric, or a Bob Dylan lyric, from 1965-6. Of course there were LOTS of folkies and blues singers who referenced other acts, clear back into the '40s, '30, '20s. And classical composers stole from each other all the time.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by rcarlberg View Post
    ^^Doesn't count. John was referencing himself.
    Who says? I don't see any rules.
    Orange is the new stupid.

  8. #8
    Member Emeritus (A.M.P.) rcarlberg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    6,553
    Okay, I stand corrected. The OP says “other prog” not other prog groups. Could’ve meant other prog songs.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by rcarlberg View Post
    Kevin Ayers, not Gilbert I reckon. Gilbert would've been three years old in 1969. I mean, he was a prodigy, but... he wasn't on "Top Gear" in nappies.
    Haha! Of course!!

  10. #10
    Member Mythos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Wolf City
    Posts
    442
    Well, if there are no rules, does King Crimson referencing themselves in "The Court of the Crimson King" count? (1969)

    On soft gray mornings widows cry
    The wise men share a joke;
    I run to grasp divining signs
    To satisfy the hoax.
    The yellow jester does not play
    But gentle pulls the strings
    And smiles as the puppets dance
    In the court of the crimson king.

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    248
    Okay, it's not a "prog" song but it's the best I could do under these difficult conditions:

    All summer long we were dancing in the sand
    Everybody just kept on playing "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band"


    Summer Rain - Johnny Rivers 1967

    This one just came to me and is better, but a little later in the game:

    But Frank Zappa and the Mothers
    Were at the best place around


    Smoke On The Water - Deep Purple 1972

  12. #12
    Member Emeritus (A.M.P.) rcarlberg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    6,553
    Peter, Paul & Mary, 1967, "I Dig Rock and Roll Music":
    I dig the Mamas and the Papas at "the trip"
    Sunset strip in L.A.
    And they got a good thing goin'
    When the words don't get in the way
    And when they're really wailing
    Michelle and Cass are sailin'
    Hey! they really nail me to the wall
    Donovan kind of in a dream-like, tripped out way
    His crystal images tell you 'bout a brighter day
    And when the Beatles tell you
    They've got a word "love" to sell you
    They mean exactly what they say

  13. #13
    These earlier references are more and more dubious re: the whole prog thing. Just sayin'.
    Maka ki ecela tehani yanke lo!

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    248
    Quote Originally Posted by Sturgeon's Lawyer View Post
    These earlier references are more and more dubious re: the whole prog thing. Just sayin'.
    Do you accept the 1972 song, Smoke on The Water, for its reference to Zappa and the Stones. Deep Purple and Zappa are kinda prog?

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    2,981
    Barclay James Harvest's A Tale Of Two Sixties has references to psychedelia-era acts like Zappa/The Mothers (specifically 'Flower Punk') and Love.

  16. #16
    Member Emeritus (A.M.P.) rcarlberg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    6,553
    Quote Originally Posted by Sturgeon's Lawyer View Post
    These earlier references are more and more dubious re: the whole prog thing. Just sayin'.
    When was 'prog' defined? Mid-70s?

    Oh no. Let's not start that discussion again. Nevermind.

  17. #17
    Jazzbo manqué Mister Triscuits's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Utopia
    Posts
    2,577
    Quote Originally Posted by rcarlberg View Post
    Nevermind.
    No, that's grunge.

  18. #18
    Member Emeritus (A.M.P.) rcarlberg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    6,553
    Quote Originally Posted by Mister Triscuits View Post
    No, that's grunge.

  19. #19
    Barclay James Harvest - Poor Man's Moody Blues.

  20. #20
    Member Emeritus (A.M.P.) rcarlberg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    6,553
    Engelbert Humperdinck

  21. #21
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    248
    Oh, for the reference to the 19th-century German composer of operas such as Hansel and Gretel? But, is that prog?

  22. #22
    Well, if this thread is getting loose enough to allow 19th century composers (Engelbert Humperdinck) and his 60's and 70's crooner namesake, then for sure, English 17th century agricultural inventor, Jethro Tull, and his 20th century rock band namesake should also be allowed.
    And if there were a god, I think it very unlikely that he would have such an uneasy vanity as to be offended by those who doubt His existence - Russell

  23. #23
    Genesis on The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway, reference "On Broadway", and "It's Only Rock 'n Roll" ("It's Only Knock And Knowall").

    Non-prog being referenced in prog.
    And if there were a god, I think it very unlikely that he would have such an uneasy vanity as to be offended by those who doubt His existence - Russell

  24. #24
    Frank Zappa and the Mothers
    Were at the best place around
    But some stupid with a flare gun
    Burned the place to the ground...

    Release date: March 25, 1972
    "And your little sister's immaculate virginity wings away on the bony shoulders of a young horse named George who stole surreptitiously into her geography revision."

    Occasional musical musings on https://darkelffile.blogspot.com/

  25. #25
    Pink Floyd's "Let there be More light" (1967) mentions "Lucy in the Sky," but neither are prog.
    Orange is the new stupid.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •