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Thread: R.I.P. Neil Peart

  1. #176
    Member Jerjo's Avatar
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    Now playing (loudly): Grace Under Pressure Tour Live
    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

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  3. #178
    Member Top Cat's Avatar
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    I received an email from Bandcamp about this Rush Tribute from Dave Kerzner and Sonic Elements.
    Proceeds will go to CHARITY DEDICATED TO NEIL PEART WITH NEW MUSIC! We'll be making monthly donations to the GORD DOWNIE BRAIN CANCER RESEARCH FOUNDATION.
    Dave's Facebook page explains everything, including the Bandcamp page for purchase.
    I listened to a couple of tracks and purchased the $10 Special Edition with 50% going to the donation.
    I highly recommend it..has tracks from Billy Sherwood, John Wesley, Rick Emmit, Glass Hammer, District 97, In Continuum.
    Sounds fantastic, they did a great job with this.
    https://www.facebook.com/davidkerzne...78856279790111
    Soundcloud page: Open Window, musical meanderings https://soundcloud.com/precipice Bandcamp: https://richardhermans.bandcamp.com

  4. #179
    Nice complimentary article in today's New York Times.

    Neil Peart’s Essential Songs: Hear 10 Tracks
    The Rush drummer and lyricist known for his intricate yet explosive playing has died at 67.

    After Neil Peart joined Rush, the band’s sound shifted into the space where the power of heavy metal meets the headiness of prog-rock.Credit...Fin Costello/Redferns
    By Christopher R. Weingarten
    • Jan. 12, 2020Updated 11:03 a.m. ET

    Neil Peart, the drummer and lyricist for the Canadian prog-rock band Rush for more than 40 years, died on Jan. 7 at 67. Regarded as one of the greatest rock drummers of all time, he combined virtuosic technical ability, arena-filling intensity, exacting precision and enough restraint to endure as a constant presence on FM radio.

    To drummers in the ’70s and ’80s, Peart was an Eddie Van Halen figure, someone whose pyrotechnic chops seemed to be the ne plus ultra. Peart never shied from flashy soloing or tom-tom blitzkriegs on his massive kit, yet he was also a master of discipline whose steady but tastefully punctuated grooves propelled “Closer to the Heart,” “Tom Sawyer” and “The Big Money” to the Billboard Hot 100.

    By the 1990s, a generation of drummers influenced by Peart had turned chops and bluster into platinum success, among them Chad Smith of the Red Hot Chili Peppers, Stephen Perkins of Jane’s Addiction, Tim “Herb” Alexander of Primus and Mike Portnoy of Dream Theater. As his own career progressed, Peart absorbed inspiration from new wave, jazz, bossa nova and African music, and — though an untouchable giant on the kit — still took lessons into the ’90s and ’00s from jazz musicians including Freddie Gruber and Peter Erskine. Rush remained a massive concert draw until its final show in 2015.

    ‘Anthem’ (1975)
    “He comes in, this big goofy guy with a small drum kit, and Alex and I thought he was a hick from the country,” the Rush frontman Geddy Lee recalled in The Guardian of Peart’s tryout for the band. “Then he sat down behind this kit and pummeled the drums — and us. As far as I was concerned he was hired from the minute he started playing.”
    After Peart, then 21, joined Rush, its sound evolved from the spirited hard rock of its 1974 self-titled debut to the complex, skittering power trio that pioneered the space where heavy metal thunder meets prog-rock ostentation. Peart’s hectic drum style was influenced by U.K. busybodies like the Who’s Keith Moon and Cream’s Ginger Baker; his lyrics were informed by the individual-minded writings of Ayn Rand and the fantastical worlds of J.R.R. Tolkien. On the opening track of “Fly by Night” from 1975, Rush’s first album with Peart, he begins with guns blazing, tick-tacking through a 7/8 riff. Throughout, Peart embellishes with snare flurries and splash cymbal accents, ending with a precise tumble through his toms.

    ‘Working Man’/‘Finding My Way’ (Live) (1976)
    Peart’s highly technical drum solos were an essential part of the Rush live experience. On its first live album, “All the World’s a Stage” from 1976, Peart puts his manic signature on two songs that Rush released before he was in the band, then bursts into a jazz-flecked snare workout. For nearly three minutes on the fourth side of this double LP, Peart runs circles around his kit: eight toms, two splash cymbals, four cowbells. A simple ostinato for his four limbs — hand-hand-foot-foot — turns into a tornado.

    ‘Xanadu’ (1977)
    As Rush’s ambitions expanded, so did Peart’s kit. The dynamic and orchestral “Xanadu,” the 11-minute opener of the band’s fifth album, “A Farewell to Kings,” naturally features Peart’s tom explosions alongside the band’s unpredictable shifts in rhythm. But “Xanadu” is also notable for more austere portions where Peart emotes like a one-man orchestral percussion section, working through wooden temple blocks, wind chimes, tubular bells, glockenspiel, a bell tree and tuned cowbells. Based on the famous Samuel Taylor Coleridge poem, Peart described the song in the program for the band’s 1977-1978 tour as “certainly the most complex and multi-textured piece we have ever attempted.”

    ‘La Villa Strangiato’ (1978)
    “Yes, it is an indulgence,” Geddy Lee told The Guardian about this 12-part suite, “but it seemed to be a pivotal moment for us in creating a fan base that wanted us to be that way.” Subtitled “An Exercise in Self-Indulgence,” “La Villa Strangiato” features the band traversing multiple moods in nine minutes and 30 seconds: Spanish guitar, synth-heavy space-prog, jazz fusion, an interpolation of Raymond Scott’s “Powerhouse” (which you would likely know from many Looney Tunes shorts) — all of which Peart handles with aplomb. “There’s also a big band section in there,” Peart told CBC Music, “which was absolutely for me because I always wanted to play that approach.”

    ‘The Spirit of Radio’ (1980)
    “‘The Spirit of Radio’ is a valid musical gumbo, even now,” Peart told Spin in 1992. “The concept was to combine styles in a radical way to represent what radio should be.” Peart has said his playing was influenced by reggae, new wave and punk, but the intro and breaks here are pure Peart insanity.

    ‘Tom Sawyer’ (1981)
    With its four-times platinum eighth album “Moving Pictures,” Rush mastered a paring down from multipart suites to lean rock songs. Though it features a 7/4 interlude, “Tom Sawyer” is relatively straightforward, but still an air-drumming classic. Opening with a wide-open breakbeat and a Oberheim synth glurp, Peart’s beat became irresistible sample fodder for rappers like Mellow Man Ace and Young Black Teenagers, and an integral part of the routines of chops-heavy turntablists like DJ QBert and Mixmaster Mike.

    ‘YYZ’ (Live) (1981)
    On its second live album, “Exit … Stage Left,” Rush uses its most infamous piece of rhythmic trickery: The 5/4 riff of “YYZ” is the code for the Toronto Pearson International Airport rendered in morse. Here it meets one of Peart’s heaviest drum solos: His snare is an out-of-control locomotive. He pingpongs in the high reaches of his eight toms and indulges in some Gene Krupa-style big band stylings while simultaneously clanking a melody line on his cowbells. Peart also an early adopter of the rumbling gong bass drum — a giant drum mounted like a tom-tom — eventually embraced by bands including Dream Theater, Primus and Korn.

    ‘Subdivisions’ (1982)
    Speaking about his lyrics, Peart told Rolling Stone, “A lot of the early fantasy stuff was just for fun. Because I didn’t believe yet that I could put something real into a song.” That is, until he wrote the 1982 restless suburban lament “Subdivisions.” “From then on, I realized what I most wanted to put in a song was human experience,” he said. The track once again features a masterful use of 7/8 and explosive fills.

    ‘One Little Victory’ (2002)
    After his daughter died in a car accident in 1997 and his partner succumbed to cancer less than a year later, Peart left music and traveled around North America on his motorcycle. He returned in 2001 and Rush’s subsequent album “Vapor Trails” was one of its most rock-centric in years — its first without a keyboard since 1975. The opener “One Little Victory” was the merciless lead single, starting with Peart playing what sounds like a rockabilly groove eaten by a thrash-metal monster.

    ‘O Baterista’ (Live) (2003)
    In the mid-90s Peart felt his drumming was too metronomic, so he took lessons with the jazz drummer Freddie Gruber to loosen up his limbs. In this eight-minute drum solo from Rush’s fifth live album, you can hear a matured Peart focused on improvisation, playing out of the pocket, utilizing silence and culling melodies from his toms. “To me, drum soloing is like doing a marathon and solving equations at the same time,” Peart told Music Radar.

  5. #180
    Nice NYT article with one small glitch - Xanadu wasn't the opening track on Farewell to Kings.
    "Moustache stays right where it's at" - Clutch

  6. #181
    Member chalkpie's Avatar
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    If it isn't Krautrock, it's krap.

  7. #182
    Insect Overlord Progatron's Avatar
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    Wow...

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  8. #183
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    Not much I can add to what has already been said. I am a huge Rush fan, seem them many times. This totally sucks.....

  9. #184


    Our fearless leader Sean shared this lovely rendition of "Closer to the Heart" on Facebook a few hours ago. I think it makes a nice elegy.

    "I will not say: do not weep; for not all tears are an evil.” ~ JRR Tolkien

  10. #185
    Moderator Sean's Avatar
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  11. #186
    NEARfest Officer Emeritus Nearfest2's Avatar
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    I posted this to Facebook Friday night in a very upset and emotional state. Thought I'd share it here...

    Rush was my first dive into being who I am as an individual. I didn’t have older siblings to inherit a record collection from. My dad liked some rock and my mom liked Neil Diamond and great Christmas music (now it’s Jimmy Buffett and Zack Brown), so I had to find Rush on my own. I found them in the early days of, yes, MTV. The likes of Tom Sawyer, Red Barchetta and Limelight often filled the screen of our console Zenith TV. I got Moving Pictures for my 11th birthday. I wore out the first side only later to “discover” side two while driving the endless switchbacks of Haleakala volcano in Hawaii a few years later on my Sony Walkman.

    My deep dive began with the purchase of Exit Stage Left. There were songs like I’d never heard on that album, including my desert island song, La Villa Strangiato. But it was the drum solo in the middle of YYZ that made me sit up and pay attention. To this day, I can “play” most of that solo in the air or on my steering wheel. That impression made a big impact and Neil Peart is and will remain my favorite drummer of all time. His lyrical prowess does not go without merit. He wrote some of the most creative, thought-provoking cerebral lyrics in all of rock. Words both quotable and wise.

    The final push happened when my good friend Chris Almont would pick me up for school every day with 2112 blaring on the stereo of his Nissan Sentra. After that, I bought every album. This band had everything. The virtuosity, the smarts and the incredible live shows. I first saw them live on December 14, 1987 on the Hold Your Fire tour. I was enthralled, and I cherished every moment that I got to see them live over the years up until their last tour in 2015. Geddy’s charisma and wizardry on the bass, keyboard and vocals at stage left, Alex’s virtuosity, ingenuity and humor at stage right and of course, Neil Peart, The Professor’s full command of center stage with his massive drum set comprised of both acoustic, electric and even orchestral percussion. Everyone waited for that moment. The moment 2/3 of the way through the show when Dirk and Lerxst would slip off the sides of the stage to allow their brother Pratt to put on a clinic of precision rock drumming (with a sense of humor at times!) for the sold out crowd. The solo of solos. Sometimes on the upwards of 10 minutes. Truly a spectacle. An absolute spectacle of what one man could do on a drum kit.

    I have plenty of live albums, DVDs and Blu-ray discs to remember the man that opened my eyes and ears to Progressive Rock musical sensibilities. But the memories of watching Neil Peart play live will be ever burned in my mind.

    Discovering Rush on my own helped me become who I am. It was because of the musicality, lyrics, imagery and emotion that I got from their music that pushed me to become an individual rather than just one of many.

    Thank you, Neil. Long live Rush and may peace be with the Peart family.

    “Suddenly you were gone from all the lives you left your mark upon.”
    Chad

  12. #187
    I'm glad that Neil lived long enough to see Rush earn some mainstream appreciation and even critical respect. When I began listening to them in the early '80s, aside from a few songs in FM rotation (Tom Sawyer, Spirit of Radio, maybe Closer to the Heart) and constant praise and analysis in music geek mags (Guitar for the Practicing Musician, Modern Drummer, etc.), they were considered this weird fringe act that appealed only to geeky, socially-inept teenagers. Whenever their albums or concerts were reviewed in mainstream publications, their music was typically panned as tasteless drivel, with special emphasis on Geddy's (alleged) nails-on-chalkboard voice and Neil's (alleged) tacky, middlebrow pseudo-poetry. But over the last ten or fifteen years, it seems there has been something of a reevaluation and a welcoming into the rock establishment fold. The I Love You Man movie, Colbert appearance, Rolling Stone cover, HoF induction, Beyond the Lighted Stage documentary with celebrities and younger musicians citing their importance and influence, etc. Obviously none of this is news to anyone here, just reflecting that it's nice Peart got to see some of this mainstream appreciation in his later years. There are certainly plenty of artists, musicians, and writers who only became fashionable or respected years after their deaths.

  13. #188
    Progdog ThomasKDye's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by olias View Post
    I'm glad that Neil lived long enough to see Rush earn some mainstream appreciation and even critical respect. When I began listening to them in the early '80s, aside from a few songs in FM rotation (Tom Sawyer, Spirit of Radio, maybe Closer to the Heart) and constant praise and analysis in music geek mags (Guitar for the Practicing Musician, Modern Drummer, etc.), they were considered this weird fringe act that appealed only to geeky, socially-inept teenagers. Whenever their albums or concerts were reviewed in mainstream publications, their music was typically panned as tasteless drivel, with special emphasis on Geddy's (alleged) nails-on-chalkboard voice and Neil's (alleged) tacky, middlebrow pseudo-poetry.
    Heck, until the internet, I knew maybe TWO people (three once I got my sister into it) who liked any post-Signals Rush. I was really so very alone in this until I found fellow fans on the net.
    "Arf." -- Frank Zappa, "Beauty Knows No Pain" (live version)

  14. #189
    Member PixelDelirium's Avatar
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    SiriusXM tribute:

    http://siriusxm.us/neilpeart

    Also, Eddie Trunk's show tomorrow is going to be a tribute to Neil (with guests):

    https://twitter.com/EddieTrunk/statu...91186275094529

  15. #190
    Just read it in the newspaper. Sad news indeed, time to spin some Rush the coming days.

    Read on Facebook something with Neil Peart RIP, but it didn't occure to me he was really dead.

  16. #191
    Member Phlakaton's Avatar
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    My first hero - I spent my life from about 8 to now with Rush - when I turned a teenager and a few years beyond I listened mostly Rush. Zappa too but Rush was my bag. Neil had a musical touch - his parts were always the thing that resonated with me as a young drummer... I copied it all. It didnt hit me until yesterday how much he was a part of my life.

  17. #192
    NEARfest Officer Emeritus Nearfest2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PixelDelirium View Post
    SiriusXM tribute:

    http://siriusxm.us/neilpeart

    Also, Eddie Trunk's show tomorrow is going to be a tribute to Neil (with guests):

    https://twitter.com/EddieTrunk/statu...91186275094529
    Tonight from 7-9pm ET on Deep Tracks (SiriusXM Ch. 27), David Fricke will be hosting a two-hour special called "Closer to the Heart: The Music of Rush's Neil Peart".
    Chad

  18. #193
    Member chalkpie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nearfest2 View Post
    Tonight from 7-9pm ET on Deep Tracks (SiriusXM Ch. 27), David Fricke will be hosting a two-hour special called "Closer to the Heart: The Music of Rush's Neil Peart".
    Cool thx, will try to remember to check that out.
    If it isn't Krautrock, it's krap.

  19. #194
    Member Rajaz's Avatar
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    Sometimes in life when sad news come in, it makes it much easier to manage one's emotions when someone you love so dearly delivers them.
    Having said that, it was my son who first told me about Neil's death and if I were alone in this world, news like that would have been a lot more devastating than they were a that moment.
    And I am so glad to have had the chance to invite my son a couple of times to see Rush with Neil, his favorite track is YYZ and mine is Subdivisions and are among Neil Peart's trademarks.

    Also, fortunately for me, not only as a fellow Canadian but a huge Rush fan, I saw Rush a Total of 14 times (from 1974-2015) and cherish every golden second of them that will last with me for life. Nothing will take away those amazing and memorable concert moments seeing Neil and his incredible musicianship on stage.

    My heart felt condolences go to Neil's family that includes Geddy and Alex and the whole world wide Rush loyal fan base that will keep his music alive as the ghost rider encounters the sunset of his time on this world and into the next one, live on brother Neil.

    LL
    My PROG shows:
    YES - Montreal Forum, Feb. 74 - The Winery, Saratoga, CA Aug 2016
    ELP - Montreal Forum, Dec. 73 - Verizon, Houston TX May 2010
    Pink Floyd - Olympic Stadium, July 77 - Yankee Stadium, NY Jun 94
    Jethro Tull - Montreal Forum, Jun 73 - LA Forum, Nov 78
    Rush - Montreal Forum, July 84 - Toyota Ctr, Houston, TX May 2015
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  20. #195
    Member Phlakaton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rajaz View Post
    Sometimes in life when sad news come in, it makes it much easier to manage one's emotions when someone you love so dearly delivers them.
    Having said that, it was my son who first told me about Neil's death and if I were alone in this world, news like that would have been a lot more devastating than they were a that moment.
    And I am so glad to have had the chance to invite my son a couple of times to see Rush with Neil, his favorite track is YYZ and mine is Subdivisions and are among Neil Peart's trademarks.

    Also, fortunately for me, not only as a fellow Canadian but a huge Rush fan, I saw Rush a Total of 14 times (from 1974-2015) and cherish every golden second of them that will last with me for life. Nothing will take away those amazing and memorable concert moments seeing Neil and his incredible musicianship on stage.

    My heart felt condolences go to Neil's family that includes Geddy and Alex and the whole world wide Rush loyal fan base that will keep his music alive as the ghost rider encounters the sunset of his time on this world and into the next one, live on brother Neil.

    LL
    I managed to get my oldest son and my dad to go to the Moving Pictures tour - 3 generations at a Rush show works for me!

  21. #196
    Insect Overlord Progatron's Avatar
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    It's been so amazing to see the outpouring of love and shared grief over Neil's death. I don't think I've ever seen it on such a scale, even when we lost people like Bowie, Lemmy, etc. and not just (an incredibly wide range of) musicians, either, but politicians and other public figures too.

    My own little tribute was shared by a popular site called Rush Is A Band, and it's been shared over 300 times just from that site alone. And to think that each of those create their own shares is amazing to me (I saw that one of the guys from Trans-Siberian Orchestra/Savatage shared it on his page and caused even more). The comments and general response to it have been very moving to me, and it's so rewarding to know that it has resonated with people, and that I am not alone in my feelings of loss since the awful news broke. We all share this immense loss. There is a giant void where this mighty giant once stood.
    Prog, Metal and Classic rock reviews/interviews - www.velvetthunder.co.uk

  22. #197
    Played most of the Rush catalog on Friday night. Sad news, Farewell to the King.

    https://strawberrybricks.com/guide/blogs/neil-peart-rip
    "Always ready with the ray of sunshine"

  23. #198
    My friend and I road our bikes to Neal Peart's house on Saturday to pay our respects (from afar, not to bother family).

    It is located in Pacific Palisades.


    peart.jpg
    And if there were a god, I think it very unlikely that he would have such an uneasy vanity as to be offended by those who doubt His existence - Russell

  24. #199
    I've enjoyed the Neil Peart video clips shared to this thread so far (a few I hadn't seen before), so here are a few more that I've watched over the last few days. RIP, Professor!





    ------------------------------------------------------------------
    Justin

  25. #200
    Member Guitarplyrjvb's Avatar
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    Love that Vertical Horizon Track!

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